Brandon Maso, CFI, CFII, MEI

Brandon Maso, CFI, CFII, MEI I am a freelance Certified Flight Instructor-Instrument (CFII) based in the North Dallas, Texas area. My home airports are KADS and KTKI. I began flying at the age of ten, and obtained my private pilot certificate at the minimum legal age of 17.

Since that time, I have gone on to to obtain my Instrument, Commercial, Flight Instructor, Flight Instructor-Instrument, and Multi-Engine Commercial ratings. I flight instruct full-time, and am available to provide instruction and sign-offs for the Sport, Recreational, Private, Instrument, or Commercial checkrides and associated written exams. In addition, I can provide a Flight Review in any Single-Engine airplane, or conduct training and provide a sign-off for the high-performance or complex endorsements. Please visit my scheduling site in order to schedule time with me. However, also feel free to call, send a Facebook message, or e-mail me prior to scheduling time. Scheduling site: Maso.youcanbook.me

05/20/2019
aeronav.faa.gov

Hey fellow aviators! Look closely at this SID (one that I have to fly all the time), then comment and tell me if anything looks amiss! When you see it, let me know what you think, or what you would do!

https://aeronav.faa.gov/d-tpp/1905/00655ROCKT.PDF

02/24/2019

Thoughts go out to my fellow cargo and 767 pilots who were killed when their aircraft crashed on initial approach into Houston this afternoon.

Fair skies and tailwinds.

11/15/2018

Hi all, I know I’ve been silent on this page for a while, a lot has happened between the last time I posted and now! Just this past week I got my type rating in the Boeing 757/767! I have not given up instructing and still happily do it on my days off while at home in Dallas. If anyone has any questions feel free to contact me/reach out, as usual! Otherwise, you can catch me in some videos created by my fellow pilot and very good friend Josh (Aviation101), formerly MrAviation101! Fly safe!

07/04/2017

CFII tip of the month:

Sorry for the lack of posts recently. The new gig has kept me busy! But here's one for June/July, expect another in a few weeks!

Many pilots know that the recommended distance to remain away from convective activity is 20 nautical miles. But do you know why? The reason is because with large, supercell t-storms, the updrafts within the storm can be so great, that hail will actually be thrown up and out the sides of the storm. At times, this can be observed as horizontal (or the normal vertical) virga below the anvil top of the storm. Additionally, some of a storm's most severe turbulence can, at times, be found immediately adjacent to the cell itself.

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

04/27/2017

CFII tip of the month:

Do you know the difference between Mist (BR) and Fog (FG) in a (U.S.) METAR report? Obviously, both denote low visibility and, many times, IFR or marginal VFR conditions. But the key, technical difference is that if the prevailing visibility is

04/04/2017

CFII tip of the month:

Do you have a good method to avoid CFIT? While this is considered a special emphasis item by the FAA, it's still one that I've found receives too little attention throughout the industry.

If you fly a more advanced aircraft equipped with GPWS or EGPWS, you should, obviously, always make use of it.

If not, then make sure to have at least one cockpit display or chart open for the purpose of terrain avoidance. If you're flying at night or in IMC (VFR or IFR), then flying at least 1,000ft above the highest obstacle, or above the atc MVA is also prudent!

For more information, consult a local CFI!

11/29/2016

CFII tip of the month:

Do you know which equipment aboard your aircraft is REQUIRED? If you have an MEL, then you have a relatively quick and easy way to determine what CAN be inoperative and still permit flight.

If you have no MEL (this is most GA operations), you'll have to refer to 14 CFR 91.205. This regulation outlines each item required for a specific kind of operation (day vs night, VFR vs IFR).

Use your favorite search engine and search for that regulation for additional information with regard to a particular flight!

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

09/27/2016

CFII tip of the month:

Did you know that there's a rough formula to estimate a tire's hydroplaning speed (in kts)? It is 9x the square root of your tire pressure!

So, for easy math, if you know that you'll be landing on a runway with standing water, and your tires are all equally pressurized to 36psi, your hydroplane speed would be approximately 54kts. Now, it's important to note that MANY other factors go into this, and that this formula is meant to be used as a rough ESTIMATE, only. It's useful nonetheless, though!

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

09/14/2016

Hey everyone,

I'm realizing that I can't quite keep to my "CFII tip of the week," statement, as I've just been so busy and there's no light at the end of the tunnel. While that's both good and bad in various ways, I still love corresponding with everyone and being able to reach out to so many people in the aviation community. That said, I'll start making it "CFII tip of the month," on a regular basis, and will post periodic updates and photos so that the page doesn't get TOO boring!

07/23/2016

I was waiting for him to make the first announcement--I don't steal thunder :)

But, BIG CONGRATULATIONS to one of my closest friends Josh, or as some of you may know him, MrAviation101, for successfully completing his initial CFI today! He completed it and on the first attempt, no less! I truly don't mean to come off as condescending when I say this, but I doubt that many people grasp the shear amount and complexity of information/knowledge and skill that one must possess in order to complete this milestone!

Great job buddy! Wish I could be there to celebrate with you tonight!

07/05/2016

CFII tip of the week:

I hope all of my fellow Americans have a happy Independence Day! With that in mind, stay safe and exercise good ADM skills with regard to flying after the holiday celebrations.

Remember, the old 8 hours "from bottle to throttle," adage? FAR 91.17 stipulates that you won't consume any amount of alcohol within 8 hours of operating an aircraft, with a BAC of over .04, and/or while under the influence of ANY intoxicating substance (including medication). So, if you drink two sips of a light beer, you technically can't fly even six hours later. Conversely, if you and your old college buddies get slammed one night, but you quit drinking 9 hours before a flight and would still blow a .05--that's also illegal. And yes, I agree that this reg is written vaguely--likely on purpose--in order to give the FAA as much enforcement latitude as possible against anyone who might choose to push the envelope. Obvious moral of the story: flying and alcohol don't mix.

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

06/06/2016

CFII tip of the week:

Have you calculated Density Altitude (DA) lately? If you live in the Northern hemisphere, this is something that you should consider doing as we move into the hot Summer months. Especially in higher elevations, it's absolutely crucial that you run performance calculations prior to attempting operations.

For those of you flying naturally aspirated light-singles, you may even be surprised to find that, in many cases, the DA exceeds your aircraft's service ceiling and/or performance charts!

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

05/26/2016
www.faa.gov

CFII tip of the week:

Do you have a written or practice test coming up soon? If so, you'll want to make sure to check out the below links for the FAA's new ACS (airmen certification standard), which is slated to replace the PTS and current written testing structure on June 15th (only 3 weeks away).

For anyone who wants my opinion based on what I know so far, I see it as a good thing in that it finalizes the deletion of many no-longer-pertinent test questions on the Private and Instrument written tests.

On the other hand, there are a few, yet subtle, changes to the flight portion of the practical tests, some of which I believe to be incorrect or unnecessary. For example, slow flight now explicitly states that no indication of a stall should be present during the task, which is contrary to the essence of the maneuver (i.e. getting and staying on the backside of the power curve), and contrary to the FAA flying handbook and the way we were all previously taught. I'm all for change when it's a positive one! My point here-- thoroughly read through the new ACS whether you're an instructor or student!

https://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/media/whats_new_general.pdf

https://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/acs/

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

05/13/2016

CFII tip of the week:

Do you know what a "dry line" is? Did you also know that an advancing dry line can produce thunderstorms just as, or more, severe than a cold front?

Sparing everyone a long, complicated explanation, just know that dry air is MORE dense than moist air (of the same or similar temperature). Stay tuned for next week's tip on WHY this is the case, or have your CFI explain it to you in the if you can't wait that long!!

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

05/09/2016

Anyone who knows me knows how appreciative I am of ATC'ers (air traffic controllers) at all times, but tonight I owe a sincere THANK YOU to the guys over at Fort Worth Center and DFW approach for helping to get us back to Addison safety.... We had NO on-board weather, made them aware of it, and they did a seamless job of guiding us around some pretty bad thunderstorms.

Controller friends who follow my page- if you know anyone who was working 124.75 or 132.02 at ZFW, or 125.02 & 124.3 at D10 between 7 and 9:30p.m. tonight, tell them the pilot of N314PW says thank you!

05/05/2016

CFII tip of the week/things ATC wish you knew:

Did you know that class D towers cannot issue "radar vectors," to an aircraft because they are not, as the FAA calls it, "radar facilities."

That's why you may hear a class D tower tell an aircraft to "fly SUGGESTED heading...." That said, if you choose to ignore or disobey said instruction, you're possibly placing yourself or another aircraft in danger.

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

04/29/2016

CFII tip of the week/things ATC wish you knew:

Did you know that, with the exception of some airports that have obtained an FAA waiver, air traffic controllers cannot issue a "line-up-and-wait" instruction from an intersection at night? In other words, they must either clear you for takeoff or tell you to "hold short," if you're requesting an intersection departure if, for instance, traffic is clearing downfield while at night.

This rule was spawned, in part, by a deadly runway collision that occurred at LAX in 1991 in which an aircraft holding on the runway was struck by an arriving aircraft. The NTSB determined that while the tower controller lost situational awareness, the landing United Airlines crew was unable to see the twin-turboprop holding on the runway, as their lights "blended" into the runway's edge and centerline lighting system.

04/26/2016

Hey all, so I've been thinking about adding a "twist" to my weekly (or sometimes bi-weekly) "CFII tip of the week." That is, I'd like to start alternating my "tip of the week" with a new weekly program that I'd like to coin "things air traffic controllers wish you knew."

I'm doing this because I've become close with several of my home field controllers and, over the years, have learned SO MUCH about the NAS (natl. airspace system) and various ICAO controlling requirements. Unfortunately, most pilots are never exposed to the "other side" of the system, and so even with the FAA orders and things like the pilot/controller glossary, there will always be a disconnect. As such, frustration sometimes bubbles up on either end. For example- I can't tell you guys the # of times that I've heard fellow pilots moan about traffic delays from a control tower, never realizing that the controller's hands are tied, such as with wake turbulence, or releases from a TRACON.

Thoughts?

04/13/2016

Hey guys, I had shared this on my personal page yesterday, and thought that it'd be nice to share with you all today (even though it's a day late)! As usual, stay tuned for this week's "CFII tip of the week," in the next couple of days!

"Today marks a very important anniversary in my life:
On this day in 2008, I became a private pilot with only about 50 hours in my logbook. At the time, 17 year old me would've never been able to imagine being where I am today, and what aviation has done for/with me during that time. It has gone from a casual pastime to a full time job and now, eight years, seven more ratings, 1600+ hours, 3000+ landings, 40+ different aircraft, and probably 100 or more friendships later-- I can still affirm that I love what I do."

CFII tip of the week:Let's shift gears a bit away from weather... Have you or someone you know ever committed an acciden...
03/31/2016
ASRS - Aviation Safety Reporting System

CFII tip of the week:

Let's shift gears a bit away from weather... Have you or someone you know ever committed an accidental violation of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) and found yourself the subject of an FAA investigation? If so, you're allowed a "get of jail free card," once every 5 years, if necessary.

Say, for instance, you are caught having violated class Bravo airspace. Within 10 days of the alleged violation, go to the following website http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov, which is run by NASA and, under FAR 91.25, any information you provide cannot be used against you for enforcement purposes. This doesn't mean you have a clean record with the FAA, but rather, you won't incur the punishment associated with said violation.

That said, take note of the following:

1) This is a 5-year "pass" only, i.e. you can't bust airspace once a year and submit this form, and you must submit it within 10 days of the alleged violation.

2) This won't "clear" your violation record with the FAA, rather, upon adjudication of an FAA case against you, you can show proof that you've submitted this form (and thus are a safety conscious individual), and the FAA will not suspend or revoke your license.

3) Confidentiality of this report is not guaranteed for criminal acts. So if you admit to smuggling 100 kilos of "the good stuff" in from South America, you'll almost certainly be visited by law enforcement.

4) Filing this form does not relieve you of the duty to report an accident or serious incident to the NTSB, and note that both the NTSB and FAA can (and likely still will) pursue an investigation, if warranted, irrespective of you filing this form.

See the website link in the initial part of this post for additional and official information.

Disclaimer: I am a Certified Flight Instructor in the United States and am licensed by the U.S. FAA/DOT. Any and all advice or tips that you obtain from my page are simply that--advice and tips. Do not construe anything obtained here as official flight instruction. For that, please consult an instructor in your local area.

The Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) is a safety reporting system for the aviation industry. ASRS captures confidential reports, analyzes the resulting aviation safety data, and disseminates vital information to the aviation community.

Address

16051 Addison Rd
Addison, TX
75001

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