U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southwest Region
(10)

The Southwest Region encompasses Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Oklahoma, with our Regional Office in Albuquerque, New Mexico. We work with a variety of partners and other agencies, communities, tribal governments, conservation groups, businesses interests, landowners and concerned citizens to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, and their habitat.

Mission: The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
06/03/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Snowy plovers spend summers on sandy beaches, salt flats and dunes where they make nests by scraping a shallow depression. In some areas, females may have up to three broods, typically with a different male each time.

Photo: Snowy plover in Alabama by Keenan Adams/USFWS.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
06/02/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Ruby-throated hummingbirds can be found in woodlands throughout much of the eastern half of the U.S. in the summer. These birds rely on nectar and insects, sometimes pulling prey from spider webs!

Photo: Ruby-throated hummingbird perched on a branch by Courtney Celley/USFWS.

London Peterson, a 15-year-old from Eufaula, placed in the Top 10 of the 2020 National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest wit...
06/01/2020

London Peterson, a 15-year-old from Eufaula, placed in the Top 10 of the 2020 National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest with her painting “Morning Serenity” (a pair of Common Goldeneyes)

Link: https://www.facebook.com/OkWildlifeDept/posts/3097268183656106

London Peterson, a 15-year-old from Eufaula, placed in the Top 10 of the 2020 National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest with her painting “Morning Serenity” (a pair of Common Goldeneyes). The Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program is a dynamic art and science-based curriculum that teaches wetland and waterfowl conservation to students in kindergarten through high school. The program encourages students to explore their natural world, invites them to investigate biology and wildlife management principles and challenges them to express and share what they have learned with others. This year’s contest included over 14,000 young artists from around the nation. Submissions for the 2021 contest are due by March 1st postmarked to Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. More information regarding contest rules and its associated curriculum can be found at: https://www.fws.gov/birds/education/junior-duck-stamp-conservation-program/conservation-education-curriculum.php

Image copyrighted; used with permission from the USFWS Jr Duck Stamp Program.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/31/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

As #WetlandsMonth draws to a close, please take a moment to listen to our latest Talk on the Wild Side podcast, a celebration of how incredibly important wetlands are to Americans and our work with them.
https://go.usa.gov/xw4TZ
Photo by Ryan Moehring/USFWS

The Service is excited to announce the success of this year's Mexican wolf cross-foster efforts. A record 20 captive-bor...
05/30/2020

The Service is excited to announce the success of this year's Mexican wolf cross-foster efforts. A record 20 captive-born pups were placed into the wild this spring thanks to the combined efforts of captive facilities across the country, LightHawk, and our state partners. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service thanks everyone involved for their commitment to ensuring cross-fostering was a success in 2020.

Link https://www.azgfd.com/mexican-wolf-population-gets-genetic-boost-with-a-record-20-captive-born-pups-cross-fostered-into-wild-packs/

Sonoran Joint Venture
05/29/2020
Sonoran Joint Venture

Sonoran Joint Venture

Did you know that the Sonoran Joint Venture states of Arizona, California, Sonora, and Chihuahua provide essential habitat for wintering Western Greater Sandhill Cranes? Learn more with USFWS Migratory Birds U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region Migratory Game Bird Coordinator, Dan Collins.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/28/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Measured in body lengths, the 3-inch rufous hummingbird has one of the longest avian migrations, from Alaska to Mexico. It is an aggressive species, but no wonder, it needs to eat to fuel up.
Photo by Tom Koerner/USFWS

Aransas National Wildlife Refuge
05/27/2020

Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

Whoop, whoop! Wintering whooping crane survey results are in! The population remains stable at an estimated 506 birds, including 39 juveniles and 192 adult pairs.

“While we did not detect growth in the size of the population this year, we do continue to observe whooping cranes outside of our primary survey area, indicating they continue to expand their winter range,” said Wade Harrell, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Whooping Crane Recovery Coordinator. “Next year, we will be adding the Holiday Beach secondary survey area to our primary survey area given we detected enough whooping crane groups there to meet our protocol for inclusion.”

Click the link below for the full report.
https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/WHCR%20Update%20Winter%202019-2020b.pdf

Sonoran Joint Venture
05/27/2020
Sonoran Joint Venture

Sonoran Joint Venture

(Español a continuación) It's not just for breeding birds! The SJV Region provides essential food and habitat for migratory birds, from wintering and stopover sites, to safe places to molt. Check out our newsletter to learn more about Sandhill Cranes, Red Knots, molting birds, and more. With USFWS Migratory Birds, Prescott College Kino Bay Center, and other partners.

¡No sólo para las aves en reproducción! La región del SJV brinda alimento y hábitat esenciales para las aves migratorias, desde los sitios para pasar el invierno y hacer escalas hasta los lugares seguros para mudar. Échale un vistazo a nuestro boletín informativo para saber más acerca de la grulla gris, el playero rojizo, las aves en muda y más.

Another from the southwest, the lovely red house finch has been established in all U.S. states but Alaska. They were poa...
05/25/2020

Another from the southwest, the lovely red house finch has been established in all U.S. states but Alaska. They were poached and sold illegally as pets in New York. The spread of house finches has displaced purple finches.

Photo: Male house finch in a tree by Tom Koerner/USFWS.

We usually think of invasives as those brought from other countries. While native to parts of the southwest, red-eared s...
05/24/2020

We usually think of invasives as those brought from other countries. While native to parts of the southwest, red-eared sliders have been established in most states, thanks to people releasing pets they no longer wanted.

Photo: Red-eared slider basking, by Debbie Koenigs/USFWS.

Share the shore with western snowy plovers the safe way!🏖🛑 Keep your distance. Plovers put on a "broken wing" display to...
05/23/2020

Share the shore with western snowy plovers the safe way!🏖

🛑 Keep your distance. Plovers put on a "broken wing" display to keep predators away from nests

🛑 Follow directions on signs, keep dogs leashed, avoid flying kites/drones over

🛑 #LeaveNoTrace - please pick up trash

This bird winters in the tropics and breeds far to the north, but birders in Texas and Oklahoma may be able to spot them...
05/22/2020

This bird winters in the tropics and breeds far to the north, but birders in Texas and Oklahoma may be able to spot them while they are traveling to and from.

Magnolia warblers often migrate at night, traveling long distances from wintering grounds in Central America to breeding grounds in northern states and much of Canada. They prefer to nest in dense coniferous forests with plenty of insects available. Have you seen any?

Photo: Magnolia warbler courtesy of Steve Gifford. https://flic.kr/p/24kMDmm

Cooper's hawks and Mississippi Kites are hatching and Great Horned Owls are branching (hanging out on branches outside o...
05/21/2020
Creating a Rapport with Raptors

Cooper's hawks and Mississippi Kites are hatching and Great Horned Owls are branching (hanging out on branches outside of the nest), which means parents are getting extra protective. Swainson's hawks will soon follow.

tips for coexisting with urban birds of prey

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/21/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It can be difficult to determine whether you’re looking at hogweed, hemlock or parsnip, but all of these plants have several things in common. Contact may cause unpleasant, potentially deadly, reactions. Most of these plants are invasive and easily grow in ditches and disturbed soils across the country. Get familiar with these species to stay safe!

05/20/2020
Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge

Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge

Secretary Bernhardt, through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is proposing to open or expand hunting and fishing opportunities at 97 national wildlife refuges and 9 national fish hatcheries across more than 2.3 million acres. This continues the Administration’s focus on increasing access to public lands.
Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge is part of that effort. In accordance with Secretarial Orders 3356 and 3366, Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge has developed a draft hunt plan for the refuge. Commenting on the draft is open until Monday, June 8. See more information at: https://www.fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn.aspx?id=6442461446

05/19/2020
Hunt Plan for Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge

Secretary Bernhardt, through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is proposing to open or expand hunting and fishing opportunities at 97 national wildlife refuges and 9 national fish hatcheries across more than 2.3 million acres. This continues the Administration’s focus on increasing access to public lands.

Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge is part of that effort. In accordance with Secretarial Orders 3356 and 3366, Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge has developed a draft hunt plan for the refuge. Commenting on the draft is open until Monday, June 8.

See more information at: https://www.fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn.aspx?id=6442461516&fbclid=IwAR2eqqEvnLAH9Vf6ZQ8NVjz6nm5hbKQmU_E9zK9Fpo8lVDfq1s2H8vQQhrY.

Osprey are large raptors and excellent hunters. They capture fish by swooping down and grabbing them with their sharp ta...
05/18/2020

Osprey are large raptors and excellent hunters. They capture fish by swooping down and grabbing them with their sharp talons, sometimes diving up to 3 feet under water! Have you seen any lately?

Photo: Osprey in flight by Tom Koerner/USFWS.

Check out this colorful blackbird! When it comes to finding food, common grackles are very resourceful. A small spine in...
05/17/2020

Check out this colorful blackbird! When it comes to finding food, common grackles are very resourceful. A small spine inside its mouth saws open acorns! They also pick leeches off turtles & wade into the water to grab small fish.

Photo: Common grackle courtesy of Gordon Garcia.

05/16/2020

New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office's Native Fish in the Classroom education program wraps up the 2019-2020 school year remotely. Since schools were out, biologists took video of the fish releases for the students.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AluE49bkJ4

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/15/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

We have some exciting news to share today!

For those of you that followed the Condor Cam in 2016, you may remember the darling #846 as she bounced her way from fluff-ball to full-fledged condor. Little did we know that when she took to the skies, she was destined to be a true explorer. In the past week, #846 made a flight to the Eastern Sierra (region in California) and even spent the night in the foothills of Mount Whitney! Traveling through both the U.S. Forest Service - Inyo National Forest and the U.S. Forest Service - Sequoia National Forest, this little girl has truly stretched her habitat limits considering her natal territory is located near the northern border of Los Angeles County.

This news is inspiring because it shows biologists that the reintroduced population is expanding back into the historic range. While two other condors have been similarly tracked via GPS flying to the eastern side of the Sierra Mountain range, #846 is the first reintroduced condor to have crossed the Owens Valley into the Inyo Mountains since the reintroduction. Condors inhabiting more of their former ranges reinforces the hope that a wild condor population is established in California and will continue to grow as the species recovers.

Way to go #846, we hope that you continue to be a pioneer for your species! Photos by The Condor Cave

California Condors are the largest wild birds in North America. They nest in caves on cliff faces in mountains up to 6,0...
05/15/2020

California Condors are the largest wild birds in North America. They nest in caves on cliff faces in mountains up to 6,000 feet in elevation. Their biggest threat is lead poisoning.

The best way to protect them is to switch to non-lead ammunition. #EndangeredSpeciesDay

Photo: California condor soaring in the air. Photo by USFWS.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/15/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Peregrine falcon is just one of the species that the Endangered Species Act helped recover. As we celebrate #EndangeredSpeciesDay, we recognize the national conservation efforts to protect our nation's wildlife and their habitats.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/14/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Killdeer lay 4-6 eggs and some may have up to 3 broods in a season. Once eggs hatch, chicks only need time for their feathers to dry before they can start tagging along with mom!

Photo: Killdeer with chick courtesy of Gordon Garcia.

National Interagency Fire Center
05/13/2020

National Interagency Fire Center

Every year, the National Interagency Prescribed Fire Training Center (PFTC) holds Fire Leadership for Women training modules. This year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was able to send two women to the training where they learned leadership skills, how to handle challenges, ways to improve their weaknesses and enhance their strengths, and build a strong support network of other women in fire. To learn more about this training, please visit the PFTC website - https://bit.ly/35J1MNq.
Photos by FWS

Listen to interview with Shaula Hedwall of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Julia Camps of the Coconino National F...
05/13/2020
Mexican Spotted Owls Still Thriving In Area Burned By Museum Fire

Listen to interview with Shaula Hedwall of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Julia Camps of the Coconino National Forest.

The Museum Fire burned nearly two thousand acres north of Flagstaff last July. The area is home to a federally threatened species, the Mexican Spotted Owl,

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/13/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It's #AmericanWetlandsMonth! More than half of all species protected by the Endangered Species Act rely on wetlands, including the American crocodile. #WetlandsWednesday #WetlandsMonth2020
https://go.usa.gov/xv6wG
Photo by Glenn Gardner/NPS

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/12/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Even the most prickly people have a soft side.

The first thing you'll notice about the cottontop cactus (Echinocactus polycephalus) is the web of finger-length, blood red spines encircling its plump green body. Only afterwords may you notice the dense white wool at the top of the stem, especially when encasing multiple date-sized fruits. The white fuzz (canescence) -- for which the plant is named -- that covers the fruits and young needles reflects sunlight and thereby reduces surface temperatures during the already challenging 110 degree Fahrenheit summer days in which its flowers bloom.

As vital desert defenses, the contrasting sharp spines and cuddly cotton are equally complimentary as they are contradictory.

Photo: A. Weitzenfeld/USFWS at Ash Meadows NWR

Speckled kingsnakes are nonvenomous snakes that typically grow to ~4 feet long. Their diet includes small rodents, lizar...
05/11/2020

Speckled kingsnakes are nonvenomous snakes that typically grow to ~4 feet long. Their diet includes small rodents, lizards, & they’ll even eat venomous snakes, including various pit vipers thanks to an immunity to viper venom!

Photo: Speckled kingsnake, Debbie Koenigs/USFWS.

Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced an initiative to guide bison conservation over the next decade. Lear...
05/10/2020

Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced an initiative to guide bison conservation over the next decade. Learn more: http://ow.ly/ftnJ50zAa12 #BCI2020

Photo: American bison at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge by John Carr/USFWS

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/08/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It’s time to #ZoomwithFWS! Need to spice up your Zoom calls with some nature-related content? Check out these *wild* backgrounds featuring our very own national wildlife refuges! New photos will be added every week. Find all our available Zoom backgrounds here: http://ow.ly/pVe750zxXeQ

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
05/07/2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Did you know there are four subspecies of painted turtles? Check out the visual differences and learn where each can be found!

Address

500 Gold Ave SW
Albuquerque, NM
87102

General information

Follow us on Twitter! https://twitter.com/USFWSSouthwest For the official source of information about the USFWS Southwest Region,visit our homepage at http://www.fws.gov/southwest Commenting Policy We encourage civil and constructive conversation. We never discriminate against any views, but we reserve the right to delete any of the following: --- personal attacks or otherwise violent or hateful comments --- selling or advertising --- promoting illegal activity --- off-topic posts --- personal information such as email addresses, telephone numbers, or mailing addresses If you violate these policies repeatedly, we will remove you from this page.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(505) 248-6911

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region:

Videos

Page Expectations and Guidelines

This is an official page of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. To learn more about our social media efforts, and to find a list of official USFWS social media sites, please visit our social media hub.

Our agency is known for our scientific excellence, our stewardship of lands and natural resources, and our dedicated conservation and wildlife professionals. While we hope that this page will help you stay connected to our work, we also hope that it will keep us connected to you and the issues you care about. Your participation on this page is vital and all feedback is welcome--both good and bad. Your perspective is welcomed and we hope that conversations about the Service can be productive, fun, and engaging.

Comment Policy

Whether it's a formal response to a Federal Register notice or a comment on Facebook,the USFWS is committed to making sure that all online conversations are civil. In all our forums, we monitor comments either before they are published or shortly thereafter.

We never discriminate against any views, but we reserve the right to delete any of the following:


  • violent, obscene, profane, hateful, or racist comments

  • comments that threaten or defame any person or organization

  • solicitations, advertisements, or endorsements of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency

  • comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity

  • multiple successive off-topic posts by a single user

  • repetitive posts copied and pasted by multiple users

  • personal information such as email addresses, telephone numbers, or mailing addresses
  • Egregious or repeated violations of the comment policy may result in the deletion of your comment or the reporting of your account to third party site administrators. Our approach to comments, whether on third party sites or our own blogs, is spelled out in more detail in our blog policy.

    Nearby government services


    Other Government Organizations in Albuquerque

    Show All

    Comments

    Does anyone know when the wildlife refuge by McFadden beach will be opening up for crabbing?
    I made a video for all of the shut ins who are missing the great outdoors.
    I am having difficulty with property destruction from large numbers of turkey vultures roosting in the top of a stand of ponderosa pine trees located on my property. How can I make them leave. The trees are 80 to 90 feet tall.
    I shot this video a year ago at the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge of the dawn fly out of Snow Geese. This is 4 minutes of a fly out that lasted a full 30 minutes. It was one of the most spectacular wildlife spectacles I have ever seen.
    Say NO to Spring Creek Ranch ~ HELP Stop Irresponsible Over Development
    I don't know if I'm "allowed" to post this here, but most people are unaware of the need right now. I don't work for the Audubon Society or the National Parks, I've nothing to gain personally other than the satisfaction in knowing I'm helping to protect our ecosystem...we're all interconnected!
    Last night’s colorful sunset including Ocotillo. Kofa NWR AZ.
    I got these photographs recently at the Bosque del Apache NWR in New Mexico. It is high on my list of favorite places to photograph.
    At all times of the year there is something to image. In the winter I love the Snow Geese and in the summer these are replaced with not just the wildlife but the water planning yields the beautiful Lilly pads with there flowers.
    At around 9 am this coyote was spotted at the edge of a field where he stayed long enough for a few images. Taken 2019/08/09
    Please explain why what your map of Hagerman NWR shows to be a road open to the public, the northern extension of Wright, just above and to the left of my thumb, appears to be closed, possibly illegally, by a private individual?
    Mexican wolf recovery, ruining ranchers and communities and families since 1998