The Richard Hooker Society

The Richard Hooker Society The Richard Ho**er Society for Formation in the Tradition of the Anglican Divines "Although the origins of the RHS are no longer accessible, scholars have reasonably established the lineage of the Society's genealogy back to the Education Society of Mr Francis Scott Key and the clergyman, William Meade, later Bishop of the Diocese of Virginia, and to the School of Prophets they founded.
(3)

However, it remains unclear whether the RHS arose in the newly formed Protestant Episcopal Church of America or crossed the Atlantic in the wake of the Revolution to revitalize the much besieged and floundering young Church. Whatever the origins of the Society, all are in agreement that her way has been to pass the years and decades (and centuries?) quietly, like a steady vessel gliding through mu

However, it remains unclear whether the RHS arose in the newly formed Protestant Episcopal Church of America or crossed the Atlantic in the wake of the Revolution to revitalize the much besieged and floundering young Church. Whatever the origins of the Society, all are in agreement that her way has been to pass the years and decades (and centuries?) quietly, like a steady vessel gliding through mu

Operating as usual

04/27/2021

Join us tonight here on our page at 5:00 p.m. EDT for the LiveStream of "Christ as Holy Sacrifice: A Cyrillian Christology Today" -- the first of the three Costan Lectures to be given by VTS professor of systematic theology, the Rev. Kate Sonderegger, Ph.D.

02/13/2021

The first Black priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in America, Absalom Jones was born into slavery in Sussex, DE in 1746. Self-taught to read via books bought saving pennies given by visitors to his master’s home, he purchased his own freedom in 1784.

He was an active member of St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, serving as a lay preacher for the Black members of the congregation. The Black membership at St. George’s increased tenfold through evangelistic efforts. White church officials responded by attempting to segregate the Black congregants. During a service in November 1786, ushers tried to move all Black worshippers, including Jones, from the main floor to the balcony. The Black congregants promptly left as a group.

Jones and Richard Allen subsequently founded the Free African Society on April 12, 1787. Members of this organization met regularly and paid dues which were used to benefit those in need. From there grew The African Church, organized on July 7, 1791. Jones remained as the leader of The African Church which was formally received into the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania on October 17, 1794 and renamed The Historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas - AECST; the first Black Episcopal parish in the United States.

Bishop William White (first bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania) ordained Jones a deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1795 and priest in 1804. Jones became the first ordained priest of African descent in the United States.

The Episcopal Church commemorates his life and service annually on the anniversary of his death, February 13. From “Lesser Feasts and Fasts”, is a prayer for the feast day of Absalom Jones:

Set us free, heavenly Father, from every bond of prejudice and fear; that, honoring the steadfast courage of your servant Absalom Jones, we may show forth in our lives the reconciling love and true freedom of the children of God, which you have given us in your Son our Savior Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

#bhmvts #blackhistorymonth #absalomjones

The Rev’d Dr Katherine Sonderegger discusses the Second Volume of her Systematic Theology—“The Doctrine of the Holy Trin...
01/30/2021
Katherine Sonderegger, The Inner Life of God

The Rev’d Dr Katherine Sonderegger discusses the Second Volume of her Systematic Theology—“The Doctrine of the Holy Trinity: Processions and Persons”—with a panel of theologians:

The long-awaited second volume of Katherine Sonderegger’s Systematic Theology arrived in 2020. It is a book about the Inner Life of God, exploring the Immane...

The Celtic Christian Tradition
12/06/2020

The Celtic Christian Tradition

Saint Nicholas Day, also called the Feast of Saint Nicholas, is observed on 6 December or on the eve of 5 December in Western Christian countries, and on 19 December in Eastern Christian countries using the old church Calendar. It is the feast day of Nicholas of Myra with particular regard to his reputation as a bringer of gifts.

In the European countries of Germany, boys have traditionally dressed as bishops and begged alms for the poor. In Ukraine and Poland, children wait for St. Nicholas to come and to put a present under their pillows provided that the children were good during the year. Children who behaved badly may expect to find a twig or a piece of coal under their pillows. In the Netherlands, Dutch children put out a clog filled with hay and a carrot for Saint Nicholas' horse. On Saint Nicholas Day, gifts are tagged with personal humorous rhymes written by the sender. In the United States, one custom associated with Saint Nicholas Day is children leaving their shoes in the foyer on Saint Nicholas Eve in hope that Saint Nicholas will place some coins on the soles.

The American Santa Claus, as well as the British Father Christmas, derive from Saint Nicholas. "Santa Claus" is itself derived in part from the Dutch Sinterklaas, the saint's name in that language. However, the gift giving associated with these descendant figures is associated with Christmas Day rather than Saint Nicholas Day itself. Saint Nicholas saved three children lost in the countryside. These children were kidnapped by a butcher before being saved by Saint Nicholas and returned to their parents. European people celebrate Christmas from 5-25 December. The U.S., however, doesn't publicly celebrate Saint Nicholas' Day.

11/20/2020
The Fork Church of St Martin's Parish

The Fork Church of St Martin's Parish

In this tenth part of the series on "How Did We Get the New Testament," the Rev'd Dr Ross Wright and Father Nik discuss the Gospel according to John and the Johannine Epistles

Called to Common Mission: the Lutheran-Episcopal Full Communion Partnership at 20 - Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Persp...
11/19/2020
Called to Common Mission: the Lutheran-Episcopal Full Communion Partnership at 20 - Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Perspectives

Called to Common Mission: the Lutheran-Episcopal Full Communion Partnership at 20 - Ecumenical and Inter-Religious Perspectives

By: Dcn. Mitzi Budde On January 6, 2021, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church will celebrate twenty years of full communion. Full communion was established between the churches in the ecumenical agreement, Called to Common Mission, and inaugurated in 2001 at the Washin...

History UK and EIRE
11/08/2020

History UK and EIRE

On this day 8th November 1342 The birth of Julian of Norwich, English mystic and saint (d. 1416).

Julian of Norwich, was an English anchoress and an important Christian mystic and theologian. Her Revelations of Divine Love, written around 1395, is the first book in the English language known to have been written by a woman. Julian was also known as a spiritual authority within her community where she also served as a counsellor and advisor. She is venerated in the Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches.

Photo of Statue of Julian on the front of Norwich Cathedral, holding the book Revelations of Divine Love, courtesy of Wikipedia.

The Search for the Lost Manuscript, a BBC documentary on YouTube about the history of Julian, her original manuscript and the copies made by others over the centuries.
https://youtu.be/7sbfVBB4AuY

•Here's a couple of good articles about Julian of Norwich:
http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/julian.htm

http://www.umilta.net/julian.html

•Revelations of Divine Love at Project Gutenberg
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/52958

Classical Anglicanism
11/03/2020

Classical Anglicanism

Richard Ho**er, Priest, 1600

O God of truth and peace, who didst raise up thy servant Richard Ho**er in a day of bitter controversy to defend with sound reasoning and great charity the catholic and reformed religion: Grant that we may maintain that middle way, not as a compromise for the sake of peace, but as a comprehension for the sake of truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

Classical Anglicanism
10/16/2020

Classical Anglicanism

16 October 1555
Martyrdom of Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, Bishops

Keep us, O Lord, constant in faith and zealous in witness, that, like thy servants, Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, we may live in thy fear, die in thy favor, and rest in thy peace; for the sake of Jesus Christ thy Son our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, world without end. Amen.

Lutheran Anglicans
10/14/2020

Lutheran Anglicans

Classical Anglicanism
08/23/2020

Classical Anglicanism

“For the Christians are distinguished from other men neither by country, nor language, nor the customs which they observe... They are in the flesh, but they do not live after the flesh. They pass their days on earth, but they are citizens of heaven. They obey the prescribed laws, and at the same time surpass the laws by their lives.”

Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus c.180 AD

Lutheran Anglicans
08/20/2020

Lutheran Anglicans

"Law & gospel are the terms of our eschatological destiny: before eternal God, we are accused; or we are pardoned, consoled, reckoned righteous. For all the complex legacy of modern Lutheran doctrines of faith, we can still say in a simple fashion that Christian faith just is the deep, personal recognition that law & gospel concern me; more, they determine me."

-Katherine Sonderegger in "God's Two Words: Law & Gospel in the Lutheran and Reformed Traditions."

Three Priests Walk in a Bar
08/16/2020
Three Priests Walk in a Bar

Three Priests Walk in a Bar

A new video from Three Priests Walk in a Bar on this, the Feast of St Mary or the Dormition of the Theotokos:

Mary of Nazareth, Mother Mary, Virgin Mary, Saint Mary, Mother of God, Theotokos, Queen of Heaven, Blessed Virgin Mary—She's known by many different titles. Perhaps no figure is quite as controversial in the Western church than the Mother of God. Some folks claim too much emphasis is put on Mary while others say not enough. So, what is it about Mary that gets Christians so worked up? How long have Christians been debating her title and significance? And What's at stake in those debates? Our clerics come together to offer you a conversation with absolutely no resolution to this issue and several well intentioned rabbit trails as well.

https://youtu.be/fTT4FF2dbYM

Lutheran Anglicans
08/15/2020

Lutheran Anglicans

"Then, although in ourselves we be altogether sinful and unrighteous, yet even the man which is in himself impious, full of iniquity, full of sin; him being found in Christ through faith, and having his sin in hatred through repentance; him God beholdeth with with a gracious eye, putteth away his sin by not imputing it, taketh quite away the punishment due there unto, by pardoning it; and accepteth him in Jesus Christ, as perfectly righteous, as if he had fulfilled all that is commanded him in the law...."

-Richard Ho**er in Ecclesiastical Polity, "A Learned Discourse of Justification."

07/10/2020
Three Priests Walk in a Bar

Three Priests Walk in a Bar

The Video of Episode 11 on the Creeds is now up on YouTube!

The word “Creed” comes from the Latin, “Credo,” which means, “I believe.” In this episode our Creedy Clerics discuss what we as a Church believe. What do you believe?

https://youtu.be/Yp8l5SRgsGQ

New Trinitarian Ontologies EuARe Online Panel
06/25/2020
New Trinitarian Ontologies EuARe Online Panel

New Trinitarian Ontologies EuARe Online Panel

New Trinitarian Ontologies EuARe Online Panel Hosted by the European Academy of Religion 14:00-17:00 Thursday 25 June 2020 Moderator: Ryan Haecker (Universit...

“Creed” comes from the Latin, Credo, which means, “I believe.” What do you believe?
06/24/2020
EPISODE 11: The Creeds by 3 Priests Walk in a Bar • A podcast on Anchor

“Creed” comes from the Latin, Credo, which means, “I believe.” What do you believe?

The Creeds are those defining statements of core orthodox (small "o") Christian belief. They represent what the Church has believed, does believe, and should always believe as the foundational statements to our faith. But of course there's always some bones to pick among our three clerics. Do we use...

05/31/2020
Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry

Presiding Bishop Michael B. Curry's sermon given at Washington National Cathedral on Pentecost Sunday, May 31, 2020.

Address

Alexandria, VA
22307

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when The Richard Hooker Society posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby government services


Other Alexandria government services

Show All

Comments

a new one worth a look