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The Richard Hooker Society

The Richard Hooker Society The Richard Ho**er Society for Formation in the Tradition of the Anglican Divines

"Although the origins of the RHS are no longer accessible, scholars have reasonably established the lineage of the Society's genealogy back to the Education Society of Mr Francis Scott Key and the clergyman, William Meade, later Bishop of the Diocese of Virginia, and to the School of Prophets they founded. However, it remains unclear whether the RHS arose in the newly formed Protestant Episcopal C

"Although the origins of the RHS are no longer accessible, scholars have reasonably established the lineage of the Society's genealogy back to the Education Society of Mr Francis Scott Key and the clergyman, William Meade, later Bishop of the Diocese of Virginia, and to the School of Prophets they founded. However, it remains unclear whether the RHS arose in the newly formed Protestant Episcopal C

Operating as usual

09/27/2022

Today is the birthday of The Episcopal Church! The first day of the first General Convention September 27, 1785.

Photos from The Armchair Anglican's post
09/20/2022

Photos from The Armchair Anglican's post

09/14/2022

From the Canon of the 1549 Book of Common Prayer, our first Book of Common Prayer, Archbishop Thomas Cranmer’s crowning achievement!

And although we be unworthy (through our manyfolde synnes) to offre unto thee any Sacryfice: Yet we beseche thee to accepte thys our bounden duetie and service, and commaunde these our prayers and supplicacions, by the Ministery of thy holy Angels, to be brought up into thy holy Tabernacle before the syght of thy dyvine majestie; not waiyng our merites, but pardonyng our offences, through Christe our Lorde, by whome, and with whome, in the unitie of the holy Ghost: all honour and glory, be unto thee, O father almightie, world without ende. Amen.

Photos from Nicholas Forti's post
08/14/2022

Photos from Nicholas Forti's post

06/12/2022
04/18/2022

"Although in ourselves we be altogether sinful and unrighteous, yet even the man which in himself is impious, full of iniquity, full of sin...him God beholdeth with a gracious eye, putting away his sin by not imputing it, taketh quite away the punishment due thereunto, by pardoning it; and accepteth him in Jesus Christ, as perfectly righteous, as if he had fulfilled all that is commanded him in the law."

-Richard Ho**er, "Learned Treatise of Justification."

03/30/2022

John Keble, Priest, Reformer of
the Church, 1866

O God, our heavenly Father, you raised up thy faithful servant John Keble to be a pastor in thy Church and to feed thy flock: Give abundantly to all pastors the gifts of thy Holy Ghost, that they may minister in thy household as true servants of Christ and stewards of thy divine mysteries; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

02/07/2022

One of the best portraits of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer. Source: “Herōologia Anglica” (1620)

01/25/2022

Yet we beseech thee to accept this our bounden duty and service, and command these our prayers and supplications, by the Ministry of thy holy Angels, to be brought up into thy holy Tabernacle before the sight of thy divine majesty; not weighing our merits, but pardoning our offenses, through Christ our Lord, by whom, and with whom, in the unity of the Holy Ghost: all honor and glory, be unto thee, O father almighty, world without end. Amen.
-1549 Book of Common Prayer

01/23/2022

For the last ten years of his life John Donne was the Dean of St. Paul’s, one of the most prestigious and well-paid positions in the Church of England. But before becoming the most admired and respected cleric in England, Donne had been a desperately impoverished and sometimes suicidal father of twelve. And prior to that, he had been Jack Donne the rake, a reckless young man who squandered a modest inheritance. Donne, the future Anglican cleric, began life as the son of recusant Catholics, at a time when the practice of Catholicism was illegal. And today, despite his poetry having languished in obscurity for centuries, he is best remembered as one of the greatest poets in the history of the English language.

After a few years of traveling and adventure-seeking, by 1597 twenty-five-year-old Donne had his fill of sowing wild oats and settled down to begin preparing for a career as a diplomat. Toward that end he obtained an appointment as secretary to Sir Thomas Egerton, a high-ranking royal official. But Donne’s career plans soon went down the proverbial drain after his secret marriage to Egerton’s 17-year-old niece Anne More was discovered. Anne’s father was furious and he had Donne and the officiating priest thrown into prison while he tried to annul the marriage. Eventually the marriage was proven to be valid, and Donne was released. But the scandal ruined any hope he had of becoming a diplomat. Acceding to the demands of Anne’s father, Egerton fired Donne. It would be more than 12 years before he would again have regular full-time employment.

In the years following his dismissal, Donne tried to eek out a living as a lawyer. Meanwhile a new baby was being born to the financially distressed couple every year. In 1617, Anne died at age 33 of complications following the birth of her 12th child.

As a young man, Donne had abandoned Catholicism and joined the Church of England. A few years before Anne’s death, some of his religious writings had come to the attention of King James. Although Donne did not want to become a priest, the King gave him no choice, and in 1615 he was ordained. He would go on to an accomplished career as a cleric, especially noted for his sermons, 160 of which have survived. When they were published in 1919, the sermons were met with rave reviews by literary critics. In his 1920 book Studies in Literature, Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch declared that they included some of “the most magnificent prose ever uttered from an English pulpit, if not the most magnificent prose ever spoken in our tongue.”

But it is for his poetry, not for his sermons or his work as a cleric, that John Donne is best remembered today. Through most of his fascinating life journey, Donne wrote poems, often unconventional and provocative works about love, sensuality, religion, and social commentary, but he avoided publication and generally shared them only with close friends.

When published shortly after his death in London at age 59, Donne’s poetry was met with wide public acclaim. But then public tastes changed, and John Donne essentially vanished from literary memory. He would remain essentially lost to history until the early 20th century. “The history of Donne’s reputation is the most remarkable of any major writer in English; no other body of great poetry has fallen so far from favor for so long,” declares his biographer at the Poetry Foundation.

Donne’s work was rediscovered by readers and critics and shot back to prominence in 1919. He became a favorite of such 20th century poetic luminaries as W.B. Yeats and T.S. Eliot, so that now, the biographer concludes, “Donne’s standing as a great English poet, and one of the greatest writers of English prose, is now assured.”

John Donne was born in London on January 22, 1572, five hundred fifty years ago today.

No man is an Iland,
intire of itselfe;
every man is a peece of the Continent,
a part of the maine;
if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea,
Europe is the lesse,
as well as if a Promontorie were,
as well as if a Manor of thy friends
or of thine owne were;
any mans death diminishes me,
because I am involved in Mankinde;
And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
It tolls for thee.

In modern English:

No man is an island,
Entire of itself,
Every man is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less.
As well as if a promontory were.
As well as if a manor of thy friend's
Or of thine own were:
Any man's death diminishes me,
Because I am involved in mankind,
And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
It tolls for thee.

01/17/2022

Almighty God, by the hand of Moses your servant you led your people out of slavery, and made them free at last: Grant that your Church, following the example of your prophet Martin Luther King, may resist oppression in the name of your love, and may secure for all your children the blessed liberty of the Gospel of Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
(Icon written by Br. Robert Lentz, OFM)

01/17/2022

An interesting window into Anglican worship from the early 18th century. The fashion styles and architecture leave an unmistakable imprint of the historical period:

12/30/2021
With Christmas just a week away, here’s your annual reminder that, despite what the HISTORY Channel and Sheldon Cooper f...
12/18/2021
Why is Christmas on December 25th?

With Christmas just a week away, here’s your annual reminder that, despite what the HISTORY Channel and Sheldon Cooper from the Big Bang Theory have told you, the early Church did NOT choose the date of Christmas to compete with or absorb pre-existing pagan, Roman holiday.

H/t Religion for Breakfast

Everyone assumes that early Church authorities chose December 25th for Christmas to coincide with the already popular Roman holiday of Saturnalia. This may h...

12/14/2021
12/14/2021
11/04/2021

Richard Ho**er, Priest
d.1600

O God of truth and peace, who didst raise up thy servant Richard Ho**er in a day of bitter controversy to defend with sound reasoning and great charity the catholic and reformed religion: Grant that we may maintain that middle way, not as a compromise for the sake of peace, but as a comprehension for the sake of truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

Photos from Nicholas Forti's post
10/16/2021

Photos from Nicholas Forti's post

04/27/2021

Join us tonight here on our page at 5:00 p.m. EDT for the LiveStream of "Christ as Holy Sacrifice: A Cyrillian Christology Today" -- the first of the three Costan Lectures to be given by VTS professor of systematic theology, the Rev. Kate Sonderegger, Ph.D.

02/13/2021

The first Black priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in America, Absalom Jones was born into slavery in Sussex, DE in 1746. Self-taught to read via books bought saving pennies given by visitors to his master’s home, he purchased his own freedom in 1784.

He was an active member of St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, serving as a lay preacher for the Black members of the congregation. The Black membership at St. George’s increased tenfold through evangelistic efforts. White church officials responded by attempting to segregate the Black congregants. During a service in November 1786, ushers tried to move all Black worshippers, including Jones, from the main floor to the balcony. The Black congregants promptly left as a group.

Jones and Richard Allen subsequently founded the Free African Society on April 12, 1787. Members of this organization met regularly and paid dues which were used to benefit those in need. From there grew The African Church, organized on July 7, 1791. Jones remained as the leader of The African Church which was formally received into the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania on October 17, 1794 and renamed The Historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas - AECST; the first Black Episcopal parish in the United States.

Bishop William White (first bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania) ordained Jones a deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1795 and priest in 1804. Jones became the first ordained priest of African descent in the United States.

The Episcopal Church commemorates his life and service annually on the anniversary of his death, February 13. From “Lesser Feasts and Fasts”, is a prayer for the feast day of Absalom Jones:

Set us free, heavenly Father, from every bond of prejudice and fear; that, honoring the steadfast courage of your servant Absalom Jones, we may show forth in our lives the reconciling love and true freedom of the children of God, which you have given us in your Son our Savior Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

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