USFWS International Affairs

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Many of the most critical areas for wildlife conservation are located within the most politically unstable and dangerous...
05/11/2021

Many of the most critical areas for wildlife conservation are located within the most politically unstable and dangerous parts of the world. Recently, the international conservation community was reminded of this as it suffered another tragic loss.

On April 26, while leading an anti-poaching patrol of approximately 40 people near Burkina Faso’s Arly National Park, renowned conservationist Rory Young, co-founder and chief executive officer of the non-governmental organization Chengeta Wildlife, was killed when the patrol was ambushed by an armed group (Al-Qaida affiliated JNIM has since claimed responsibility). Rory was a champion not only for wildlife but also for local communities. He was a trusted partner to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In our International Affairs Program, Rory had a longstanding partnership with WILD Foundation’s Mali Elephant Project, a long-term grantee of the Service's African Elephant Conservation Fund. His approach to support community-centered conservation that benefits both animals and people helped to engage and empower local communities to protect Africa's northernmost desert-adapted elephants, which are at serious risk due to scarce resources, warfare, and rampant poaching in the absence of effective wildlife law enforcement.

Two Spanish journalists, David Beriáin and Roberto Fraile, who were working on a documentary on Burkina Faso’s anti-poaching efforts and on communities that live in and around the country’s national parks, were also killed in the ambush. Both men were passionate about bringing conservation efforts in some of the most challenging environments to the world’s attention and had been in discussions with Rory since 2018 to make a documentary on anti-poaching work in the region.

One Burkinabe ranger was killed in the attack and others injured. The names of these rangers have not yet been released. The rangers were part of a special military wildlife unit and were one week into their first mission after completing a six-month anti-poaching training program. They exemplified heroism in the ambush, trying to defend Rory and the Spanish journalists from the attackers.

We extend our deepest sympathies to the family, friends, and conservation colleagues of the men killed and injured in this attack.

Photo: Rory Young, courtesy of Chengeta Wildlife

Many of the most critical areas for wildlife conservation are located within the most politically unstable and dangerous parts of the world. Recently, the international conservation community was reminded of this as it suffered another tragic loss.

On April 26, while leading an anti-poaching patrol of approximately 40 people near Burkina Faso’s Arly National Park, renowned conservationist Rory Young, co-founder and chief executive officer of the non-governmental organization Chengeta Wildlife, was killed when the patrol was ambushed by an armed group (Al-Qaida affiliated JNIM has since claimed responsibility). Rory was a champion not only for wildlife but also for local communities. He was a trusted partner to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In our International Affairs Program, Rory had a longstanding partnership with WILD Foundation’s Mali Elephant Project, a long-term grantee of the Service's African Elephant Conservation Fund. His approach to support community-centered conservation that benefits both animals and people helped to engage and empower local communities to protect Africa's northernmost desert-adapted elephants, which are at serious risk due to scarce resources, warfare, and rampant poaching in the absence of effective wildlife law enforcement.

Two Spanish journalists, David Beriáin and Roberto Fraile, who were working on a documentary on Burkina Faso’s anti-poaching efforts and on communities that live in and around the country’s national parks, were also killed in the ambush. Both men were passionate about bringing conservation efforts in some of the most challenging environments to the world’s attention and had been in discussions with Rory since 2018 to make a documentary on anti-poaching work in the region.

One Burkinabe ranger was killed in the attack and others injured. The names of these rangers have not yet been released. The rangers were part of a special military wildlife unit and were one week into their first mission after completing a six-month anti-poaching training program. They exemplified heroism in the ambush, trying to defend Rory and the Spanish journalists from the attackers.

We extend our deepest sympathies to the family, friends, and conservation colleagues of the men killed and injured in this attack.

Photo: Rory Young, courtesy of Chengeta Wildlife

Our partners at Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) successfully established a dedicated anti-poaching boat unit on a por...
04/28/2021

Our partners at Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) successfully established a dedicated anti-poaching boat unit on a portion of Lake Tanganyika in Zambia’s Nsumbu National Park, where poachers are known to transport elephant ivory, hippo meat, and live fish via boat. 25 officers received specialized training on boat handling, identification of illegally-traded species, and known transport routes. With the establishment of the Tanganyika Boat Unit (TABU), lake patrols increased by 50% and, for the first time since 2014, officers made no new arrests in Nkamaba bay that sits within the protected area waters.

FZS also worked to integrate the TABU into Nsumbu National Park’s wider law enforcement strategy, helping to increase cross-border collaboration and communications systems. Investigations and Intelligence Units were also formed in three major towns around the Park to raise awareness about illegal wildlife trade and the TABU’s efforts to prevent illegal transport.

Happy #WorldTapirDay! In celebration of these amazing animals, we highly recommend watching the first episode of this fu...
04/27/2021
Danta Trillo Cordillera, EP01

Happy #WorldTapirDay! In celebration of these amazing animals, we highly recommend watching the first episode of this fun animated series called Danta, Trillo, and Cordillera from our partners at Nai Conservation and the Bairds Tapir Survival Alliance!

¡ESTO ES DANTA TRILLO CORDILLERA!Caro es una investigadora experta en vida silvestre, junto a su aprendiz Gabo se aventurarán por la Cordillera de Talamanca...

What do 162 kilograms, or more than 350 pounds, of smuggled elephant tusks, two corrupt officials, a Congolese park rang...
04/21/2021

What do 162 kilograms, or more than 350 pounds, of smuggled elephant tusks, two corrupt officials, a Congolese park ranger, and training conducted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement’s Branch of Training and Inspection have in common?

The answer is a lot!

Read more in our new story about Jose Blanchard Bokandza, the first recipient of the U.S. Department of State International Law Enforcement Academy’s (ILEA) Outstanding Operational Success Award: https://www.fws.gov/news/blog/index.cfm/2021/4/21/Classroom-to-the-Field-Why-We-Do-International-Training-and-Why-it-Matters

What do 162 kilograms, or more than 350 pounds, of smuggled elephant tusks, two corrupt officials, a Congolese park ranger, and training conducted by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Office of Law Enforcement’s Branch of Training and Inspection have in common?

The answer is a lot!

Read more in our new story about Jose Blanchard Bokandza, the first recipient of the U.S. Department of State International Law Enforcement Academy’s (ILEA) Outstanding Operational Success Award: https://www.fws.gov/news/blog/index.cfm/2021/4/21/Classroom-to-the-Field-Why-We-Do-International-Training-and-Why-it-Matters

Did you know that wildlife conservation protects animals and humans too?Wildlife conservation is one of the most effecti...
04/15/2021

Did you know that wildlife conservation protects animals and humans too?

Wildlife conservation is one of the most effective tools available to prevent future pandemics. By conserving wildlife and habitat, we improve the health of wildlife and can reduce the susceptibility of wildlife to disease. 3 in 4 new infectious disease outbreaks in humans come from animals. Healthier wildlife means less disease and fewer opportunities for disease to spread from animals to humans.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s International Affairs Program is engaged in hundreds of wildlife conservation projects around the world designed to improve wildlife populations and habitat health. Our ongoing work, and the work of our partners around the world, is helping to reduce the likelihood of the next pandemic.

Some projects funded by our Great Ape Conservation Fund play a role in helping to research and stop the spread of disease to and from these incredible animals. Learn more about this conservation program: https://www.fws.gov/international/wildlife-without-borders/great-ape-conservation-fund.html

Photo credit: Kent MacElwee / Creative Commons

Did you know that wildlife conservation protects animals and humans too?

Wildlife conservation is one of the most effective tools available to prevent future pandemics. By conserving wildlife and habitat, we improve the health of wildlife and can reduce the susceptibility of wildlife to disease. 3 in 4 new infectious disease outbreaks in humans come from animals. Healthier wildlife means less disease and fewer opportunities for disease to spread from animals to humans.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s International Affairs Program is engaged in hundreds of wildlife conservation projects around the world designed to improve wildlife populations and habitat health. Our ongoing work, and the work of our partners around the world, is helping to reduce the likelihood of the next pandemic.

Some projects funded by our Great Ape Conservation Fund play a role in helping to research and stop the spread of disease to and from these incredible animals. Learn more about this conservation program: https://www.fws.gov/international/wildlife-without-borders/great-ape-conservation-fund.html

Photo credit: Kent MacElwee / Creative Commons

Several of our grant programs recently published their 2021 funding opportunities. Deadlines will be here before you kno...
03/26/2021

Several of our grant programs recently published their 2021 funding opportunities. Deadlines will be here before you know it!

Take a look at the possibilities for marine turtles, great apes (Asia), rhinos (Asia), tigers, Asian elephants, and Latin America conservation projects: https://www.fws.gov/international/grants-and-reporting/how-to-apply.html

Great story!
03/24/2021

Great story!

On International Women's Day, we honor women and their critical contributions to the world, including the world of conse...
03/08/2021

On International Women's Day, we honor women and their critical contributions to the world, including the world of conservation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its International Affairs Program have benefited from the leadership, efforts, and accomplishments of thousands of women. They are biologists, policy experts, administrators, managers, communicators, botanists, firefighters, refuge staff, educators, operations specialists, researchers, social scientists, program officers, and more. They are also moms, daughters, friends, co-workers, and people who care deeply about the mission of our agency.

Mollie Beattie (shown) was the first woman to become Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. One of her famous quotes still seems as relevant as ever today: "What a country chooses to save is what a country chooses to say about itself." During her tenure with the Service, 15 national wildlife refuges were added, more than 100 habitat conservation plans were signed with private landowners, and the gray wolf was reintroduced into the northern Rocky Mountains.

Mollie Beattie's impact and legacy continue to this day at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are grateful for women like her who are trailblazers in their field and thank women at all levels for the dedication, perseverance, creativity, and identity that they help bring to our agency.

On International Women's Day, we honor women and their critical contributions to the world, including the world of conservation. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its International Affairs Program have benefited from the leadership, efforts, and accomplishments of thousands of women. They are biologists, policy experts, administrators, managers, communicators, botanists, firefighters, refuge staff, educators, operations specialists, researchers, social scientists, program officers, and more. They are also moms, daughters, friends, co-workers, and people who care deeply about the mission of our agency.

Mollie Beattie (shown) was the first woman to become Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. One of her famous quotes still seems as relevant as ever today: "What a country chooses to save is what a country chooses to say about itself." During her tenure with the Service, 15 national wildlife refuges were added, more than 100 habitat conservation plans were signed with private landowners, and the gray wolf was reintroduced into the northern Rocky Mountains.

Mollie Beattie's impact and legacy continue to this day at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are grateful for women like her who are trailblazers in their field and thank women at all levels for the dedication, perseverance, creativity, and identity that they help bring to our agency.

In honor of #WorldWildlifeDay, we are sharing a short story from our partners at One Earth Conservation who show how bir...
03/03/2021

In honor of #WorldWildlifeDay, we are sharing a short story from our partners at One Earth Conservation who show how bird tourism provides livelihoods for people in the forests of Guyana.

"People come from all over the world to see the endangered sun parakeet of Karasabai, Guyana. The group of ecotourists pictured hail from Australia and spent the morning with One Earth Conservation, Inc. field team looking for nest cavities on a mountain side. The birds were far away and few, with no confirmed active nests. Interest was waning.

But then one of the parakeet rangers of the Makushi indigenous village of Karasabai, decided to try a different patch of the mountain side that was near the villagers’ farms. The radio from the guide next to me went off, and while Andrew Albert, Field Coordinator stayed in position, the tourists followed the guide down the trail through the forest patch. Left to himself and no birds, Albert went down the path and came upon the tourists enraptured with a pair of sun parakeets feeding only meters from them, seemingly unalarmed. They all moved around trying to get the best pictures and then the conversation became more and more animated.

As part of this project, One Earth Conservation is studying the impact of ecotourism, positive and negative, on the welfare of individual parrots and the overall population, and on the people and their village, and from this one encounter it shows a win-win situation. The villagers earn an income to support their families and their conservation efforts, the tourists seem mightily pleased, and the birds, well our study will say for sure, but for now they look like they are accustomed to the people, and their population is growing."

Photo Credits: Andrew Albert and One Earth Conservation

03/03/2021

World Wildlife Day! 🦜🐒🐋🐸🐆🦦🦈🐗🦉🐍
It's a time to celebrate and raise awareness for the world's animals and plants

This year’s theme is “Forests and Livelihoods: Sustaining People and Planet” and we think this is a very appropriate theme indeed! In T&T, our forests give us a whole host of ecosystem products and services, providing livelihoods to many rural communities.

Agriculture: Forests regulate local climates and support bio-geological processes that farmers rely on to grow their crops.
Ecotourism: World-renowned bird watching, stunning forested hikes and secluded accommodations in the “bush” provide incomes to many.
Nutrition: Hunting for protein and foraging for fruits supplement many diets across the country.

Nevertheless, T&T’s forests are not yet managed sustainably. The harmful wildlife trade has introduced a variety of non-native species, including the Tufted Capuchin and the Red-Eared Slider Turtle. It has also made many important local species all but disappear, such as the Collared Peccary (“Quenk”), Yellow-footed Tortoise (“Morrocoy”) and the Chestnut-bellied Seed Finch (“Bullfinch”). However, science based policy and management has the potential to restore these species.

On this World Wildlife Day, we give gratitude for the wonder and beauty of our biodiversity in the southern Caribbean. We hope that one day all wild creatures can live free in their forest homes and play their roles in our essential forest ecosystems.

#WorldWildlifeDay#NurtureNatureTT #KeepTheWildWild #EndWildlifeTrade #TrinidadAndTobago

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we are morning a fallen hero Pastor Hellen Mackenzie A front soldier in Quakers church as far as Spiritual matter is concerned A powerful woman of God Full of fire energy and anointing for Christ
Politics Economics and Connectivity:In Search of the South Asian Union’- A book by Dr Srimal ‘Fernando https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmI_6bQCho&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2-flNVdfPEm3Lf0ZG9Ctc5jijSA1PK0fyWuXsv_KYBvC8e3b1PBgevJmc
I cannot fathom how USFWS would vote with China??!!!! to allow export of wild elephants and their calves. Get a clue goddamn it!!!
I can't get your new post dec is the last
My name is Laurian Lenjo working with Wildlife Works as Community Relations Officer, The Climate Investment Funds together with the Government of the Kingdom of Morocco have invited me to attend "the power of 10: Shaping the Future of Climate Change" where we are meeting with different stakeholders to engage in dialogue and learn from each other and help shape the future of climate action. I would really like to attend to this event as i deal directly with indigenous communities where i am incharge of climate change and conservation education to change the lifestyle of communities and improve their livelihoods. I will appreciate if you link me with organizations that have funding opportunities where i can send my request. Any assistance will be highly appreciated Kind regards Lenjo
I'm trying to get an update on a cites permit for my trophy scimitar oryx from Mexico. The SASABE hunting & trophy logistics sent in for the permit in to USFws in my and he stated he is still waiting for the permit. Is there a way to get an update and why it is taking so long?
Really? I am ashamed to say I did not know about this misuse of my tax dollars. This is exactly why Trump won. Drain this swamp now!
Help us please. The authorities of Cyprus must make their decision. They know this petition. Getting the most signatures is our only chance to save Congo, hostage in Cyprus. Thank you !!!! https://www.mesopinions.com/petition/animaux/sauvons-lion-congo/40895
Just saw this on the today show (had to stop working and listen). We can support by buying our postage stamps from tiger stamp.com. They saved a 10 day old elephant from drowning and brought to the elephant sanctuary.
Are you allowing animal trophy parts into the U.S. again?????
HOW CAN YOU LET THE IMPORT OF WILD ANIMAL PARTS, ESPECIALLY ELEPHANTS AND RHINOS WHO ARE ENDANGERED AND HELPLESS BE IMPORTED TO THE u.s. ???????????? HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE YOU PLEASING AND HOW MANY ARE YOU UPSETTING AND DISGUSTING????????? FOLLOW THE MONEY FOLKS FOLLOW THE MONEY!!!!! YOU SELL AN ENDANGERED SPECIES STAMP? YOU SHOULD ALL JUST GO AWAY YOU ARE TRAITORS TO YOUR SITE
I don't think the exploitation of wildlife populations abroad for the sake of wealthy American hunters is something you're meant to do. Please respect and protect wildlife, here and in other countries. I am appalled at your allowing hunting of lions and elephants (I understand the elephant hunting is suspended but it should be absolutely banned).