Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery Welcome to Arlington National Cemetery’s official page on Facebook, a place to honor and remember our nation’s service members, veterans and their families. For more information, please visit https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil.
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Welcome to the Arlington National Cemetery’s official page, a place to learn more about the cemetery, and tell us what you think. If you're looking for more information about Arlington National Cemetery, visit our website at www.arlingtoncemetery.mil. You can find information on our website about eligibility (https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Funerals/Scheduling-a-Funeral/Establishing-Eligibility), scheduling a funeral (https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Funerals/Scheduling-a-Funeral), or planning your visit (https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Explore) to our nation’s most hallowed grounds. If you are looking for information on joining the #ArmyTeam, visit www.goarmy.com. Open civil service jobs are posted at www.usajobs.gov. If you have a question about Arlington National Cemetery, email us at [email protected]. This is not a forum to meet people; users who post comments asking for likes, friends or asking others to add them will have their posts deleted and may be banned from the page. While this is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and timeline posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you don't comply, your comment will be removed, and repeat offenders may be banned at any time. -We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. -We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. -We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. -We do not allow comments that are completely off-topic to the original post. -You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. The appearance of external links on this page does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Army or Department of Defense. For more information visit the DoD Social Media user agreement at: http://www.defense.gov/socialmedia/user-agreement.aspx.

Section 22.(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)
07/17/2020

Section 22.

(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)

#TodayIRemember Brigadier General William J. Flood.Flood commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in 1917. He served in World War I and...
07/15/2020

#TodayIRemember Brigadier General William J. Flood.

Flood commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in 1917. He served in World War I and World War II. Over the course of his career, he was rated as command pilot, combat observer, airship pilot, balloon pilot and balloon observer.

A pioneer aviator and balloonist, Flood was the first pilot to pick up mail from the top of a building while in flight and the first to pick up mail from a steamer at sea while in flight. In February 1930, he landed an Army Airship C-41 on the National Mall and placed a wreath at the Lincoln Memorial.

As a Colonel, he was Commanding Officer of Army Air Base, Wheeler Field in Hawaii when the Japanese attacked on December 7, 1941. He was wounded in the attacks. His decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Air Medal and Purple Heart.

He was born 125 years ago today. He is interred in Section 11. We honor his service.

Section 64.(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)
07/15/2020

Section 64.

(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)

Section 34.(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)
07/14/2020

Section 34.

(U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser)

Job Announcement: Human Resources SpecialistPerform a variety of duties relating to the responsibility and administratio...
07/10/2020

Job Announcement: Human Resources Specialist

Perform a variety of duties relating to the responsibility and administration for approximately 200 civilian employees.

Perform a variety of duties relating to the responsibility and administration of approximately 200 civilian employees.

#WorkAtANC

Job Announcement: Cemetery AdministratorPrepare detailed itineraries and operational plans for services. Meet with famil...
07/10/2020

Job Announcement: Cemetery Administrator

Prepare detailed itineraries and operational plans for services.
Meet with family members and explain planned arrangements.

Learn more and apply USA jobs: https://usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/572386900

#WorkAtANC

Today we honor World War II veteran Francis W. Flynn. 1st Lt. Flynn's bomber was shot down by German forces during a mis...
07/09/2020

Today we honor World War II veteran Francis W. Flynn. 1st Lt. Flynn's bomber was shot down by German forces during a mission over Czechoslovakia. He was taken prisoner for nine months. He passed away on this date ten years ago today. His awards include the Purple Heart and Air Medal. He is buried in Section 59. We honor his service.

On July 8, 1970, Specialist Four Joseph F. McDermott III was killed in action by small arms fire in the Quang Tri Provin...
07/08/2020

On July 8, 1970, Specialist Four Joseph F. McDermott III was killed in action by small arms fire in the Quang Tri Province of Vietnam. He is interred in Section 51. His name is also on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in D.C.: panel 9W, line 131. We honor his service.

(U.S. Army photo by Timothy Lawson)

50 years ago #OTD, George W. Casey died in a helicopter crash in South Vietnam while commanding the 1st Cavalry Division...
07/07/2020

50 years ago #OTD, George W. Casey died in a helicopter crash in South Vietnam while commanding the 1st Cavalry Division. His decorations include Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star (3), and Legion of Merit (3). He is laid to rest in Section 5. We honor his service.

Today we honor Navy Cmdr. Davis E. Boster, who served in World War II. When he left the military, he applied for jobs at...
07/07/2020

Today we honor Navy Cmdr. Davis E. Boster, who served in World War II. When he left the military, he applied for jobs at the CIA, the Navy and the Department of State. One offered Shanghai, one offered Washington, and the third offered Moscow. He took the latter and ended up serving as a political officer in 1947 under Bedell Smith, then U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union. Later in his career, Boster served as U.S. ambassador to Bangladesh (1974-1976) and Guatemala (1976-1979).

In a 1989 interview, Boster said: "I think I am just the luckiest guy in the world to have stumbled into the Foreign Service. The experience of living abroad in many different societies and learning new languages and meeting interesting people and feeling to be a part of history is all wonderful."

Cmdr. Boster died on this day in 2005 and is laid to rest in Section 60. We honor his service to America, both in uniform and in diplomacy.

Pierre Charles L’Enfant (1754-1825), a French-born engineer, is buried in a prominent location in front of Arlington Hou...
07/05/2020

Pierre Charles L’Enfant (1754-1825), a French-born engineer, is buried in a prominent location in front of Arlington House, overlooking the District of Columbia. He came to the United States early in the Revolutionary War, in which his military engineering skills proved invaluable. Commissioned in 1777, L’Enfant had a notable military record and fell wounded at Savannah, Georgia. After the war, President George Washington selected him to design the new nation’s capital. Despite his accomplishments as a soldier, engineer and city planner, L’Enfant died in poverty on a Maryland farm and was originally buried there in an unremarkable grave. In 1909, Congress ordered his remains relocated to Arlington, and he lay in state at the U.S. Capitol prior to an elaborate reinterment ceremony. #IndependenceDay

Thomas Meason (1726-1813), called “Mason” in some sources, served in Darr’s Detachment of Pennsylvania troops. He became...
07/05/2020

Thomas Meason (1726-1813), called “Mason” in some sources, served in Darr’s Detachment of Pennsylvania troops. He became a prominent lawyer after the war. His grave marker is a flat stone that lies flush with the ground. ANC’s Cultural Resources team is planning to conserve his marker and others of Revolutionary War veterans. #IndependenceDay

William Ward Burrows (1758-1805) is best remembered as the first commandant of the reconstituted U.S. Marine Corps, appo...
07/04/2020

William Ward Burrows (1758-1805) is best remembered as the first commandant of the reconstituted U.S. Marine Corps, appointed by President John Adams in 1798. Although credited with service in the Revolutionary War, his actual duties remain shrouded in mystery, and may well have been secretive in nature. Nonetheless, Burrows did join the prestigious Society of the Cincinnati after the war, indicating that he had provided valuable service to the new nation. He is interred in Section 1.

Hugh Auld (1745-1813) served in the Talbot County, Maryland militia during the American Revolution. Auld is buried next ...
07/04/2020

Hugh Auld (1745-1813) served in the Talbot County, Maryland militia during the American Revolution. Auld is buried next to his son, Hugh Auld, Jr., a War of 1812 veteran, in Section 2. Auld is the second of two Revolutionary War veterans with a government-issued marker. #IndependenceDay

During the American Revolution, James McCubbin Lingan (1751-1812) was a 2nd lieutenant in the Maryland and Virginia Rifl...
07/04/2020

During the American Revolution, James McCubbin Lingan (1751-1812) was a 2nd lieutenant in the Maryland and Virginia Rifle Regiment. He fought at the Battle of Long Island in July 1776. Captured during the disastrous battle of Fort Washington, Lingan was confined for more than three years on the prison ship HMS Jersey, under horrendous conditions. Eventually paroled, he later served as a captain in Rawling’s Additional Continental Regiment. After the war, he received the honorific title of “general.” Lingan was also famed for promoting and protecting free speech. He died defending a Baltimore newspaper’s right to publish editorials against the War of 1812: a mob, which he challenged, beat him to death.

A highly distinguished soldier, William Russell (1735-1793) is one of two Revolutionary War veterans with a standard gov...
07/04/2020

A highly distinguished soldier, William Russell (1735-1793) is one of two Revolutionary War veterans with a standard government headstone. He entered the service of his new nation in 1776 and commanded numerous Virginia Regiments, leading his units at Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. Russell, along with the rest of his garrison, surrendered to the British at Charleston in 1780. Later exchanged, he rejoined the Continental Army and witnessed the British surrender at Yorktown. Russell County, Virginia bears his name.

To learn about how William Russell and the 10 other Revolutionary War veterans were interred at Arlington, visit today's blog post:

https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Blog/Post/10877/The-American-Revolution-at-ANC-How-Veterans-of-America-s-First-Conflict-Came-to-Arlington

One of the most distinguished Revolutionary War soldiers buried at Arlington, John Green (1730-1793) saw extensive actio...
07/04/2020

One of the most distinguished Revolutionary War soldiers buried at Arlington, John Green (1730-1793) saw extensive action during more than eight years of service. After commanding a company of Minute Men at the start of the war, Green captained the 1st Virginia Regiment. Promoted to lieutenant colonel, he also served with the 10th and the 5th Virginia Regiments and distinguished himself in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. Wounded severely in combat, he later became a member of the Society of the Cincinnati, a prestigious patriotic organization. #IndependenceDay

Caleb Swan (1758-1809) served in the 9th, 3rd and 8th Massachusetts Regiments from 1777 through the end of the war. Afte...
07/04/2020

Caleb Swan (1758-1809) served in the 9th, 3rd and 8th Massachusetts Regiments from 1777 through the end of the war. Afterward, he stayed in the nascent U.S. army, received promotion and served as a paymaster from 1792 to 1808. #independenceday

James House (d. 1834) served as a gunner with the 1st Continental Artillery. He also served in the War of 1812, ultimate...
07/04/2020

James House (d. 1834) served as a gunner with the 1st Continental Artillery. He also served in the War of 1812, ultimately attaining the rank of brigadier general. His grave marker at Arlington is a white obelisk in Section 1. #IndependenceDay

John Follin (1761-1841) is the only Continental Navy sailor buried at Arlington. When a British warship destroyed his sh...
07/04/2020

John Follin (1761-1841) is the only Continental Navy sailor buried at Arlington. When a British warship destroyed his ship, the 17-year-old seaman became a prisoner of war. He was held captive for three years. After the war, he returned to Virginia and became a farmer. He is interred in Section 1. We honor his service. #independenceday

For many years after Arlington National Cemetery’s establishment on May 13, 1864, Civil War service members were the onl...
07/04/2020

For many years after Arlington National Cemetery’s establishment on May 13, 1864, Civil War service members were the only veterans buried at the cemetery. Today, however, service members who fought in all U.S. conflicts lay at rest on these hallowed grounds, including veterans of wars that predated the establishment of Arlington as a military cemetery.

On Independence Day, we take a look at how these veterans of earlier wars—including the American Revolution, the War of 1812 and the U.S.-Mexican War—came to rest at Arlington.

Blog: https://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Blog/Post/10877/The-American-Revolution-at-ANC-How-Veterans-of-America-s-First-Conflict-Came-to-Arlington

07/04/2020

ANC will be open to family pass holders only today from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. for gravesite visitation. The cemetery remains closed to the public. Cemetery grounds will close to all promptly at 5:00 p.m. #IndependenceDay

While fighting as a Private with the 8th Ohio Infantry, James Richmond captured a Confederate flag on July 3, 1863, at G...
07/03/2020

While fighting as a Private with the 8th Ohio Infantry, James Richmond captured a Confederate flag on July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg. He later fell mortally wounded at Spotsylvania. He is interred in Section 27.

His Medal of Honor citation simply reads, "Capture of flag." #MOHatANC

On July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, Wheelock Veazey of the 16th Vermont Infantry "Rapidly assembled his regiment and charged...
07/03/2020

On July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, Wheelock Veazey of the 16th Vermont Infantry "Rapidly assembled his regiment and charged the enemy's flank; charged front under heavy fire, and charged and destroyed a Confederate brigade, all this with new troops in their first battle." He is laid to rest in Section 2. #MOHatANC

On July 3, 1863, while a Major in the 19th Massachusetts Infantry, Edmund Rice demonstrated  "Conspicuous bravery on the...
07/03/2020

On July 3, 1863, while a Major in the 19th Massachusetts Infantry, Edmund Rice demonstrated "Conspicuous bravery on the third day of the battle on the countercharge against Pickett's division where he fell severely wounded within the enemy's lines."

His grave marker in Section 3 is a unique large boulder with a 1890s Medal of Honor affixed. The back of the medal is identical to the original he was awarded.

#MOHatANC

Hiram Berdan was a famous inventor and industrialist before the Civil War.  When war broke out, he created two specializ...
07/02/2020

Hiram Berdan was a famous inventor and industrialist before the Civil War. When war broke out, he created two specialized sharpshooter regiments. The “Berdan Sharpshooters” became some of the best infantry in the Army of the Potomac. At Gettysburg, Berdan led his two regiments into Pitzer’s Woods on July 2, 1863. There, they proved their strength by holding up a large group of enemy infantry. Berdan is interred in Section 2.

James Smith joined the Army at the onset of the Civil War. At Gettysburg, he commanded the 4th Independent New York Ligh...
07/02/2020

James Smith joined the Army at the onset of the Civil War. At Gettysburg, he commanded the 4th Independent New York Light Artillery Battery. During brutal combat on July 2, 1863, at the Devil’s Den, Smith deployed his battery on high ground to sweep the ground in front. As the Federal lines cracked under relentless pressure, his battery came under assault from three sides. Of the six cannons his battery deployed, three fell into the hands of onrushing combatants. The remnant of Smith’s battery was withdrawn for the rest of the battle. Smith is buried in Section 1.

James Purman served with the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry. On July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg, he helped a wounded soldier, ea...
07/02/2020

James Purman served with the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry. On July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg, he helped a wounded soldier, earning himself the Medal of Honor.

His citation reads: “Voluntarily assisted a wounded comrade to a place of apparent safety while the enemy were in close proximity; he received the fire of the enemy and a wound which resulted in the amputation of his left leg."

He is interred in Section 3. #MOHatANC

Capt. James Pipes served in the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry. His actions at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, earned him the M...
07/02/2020

Capt. James Pipes served in the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry. His actions at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, earned him the Medal of Honor.

His citation reads: "While a sergeant and retiring with his company before the rapid advance of the enemy at Gettysburg, he and a companion stopped and carried to a place of safety a wounded and helpless comrade; in this act both he and his companion were severely wounded. A year later, at Reams Station, Va., while commanding a skirmish line, voluntarily assisted in checking a flank movement of the enemy, and while so doing was severely wounded, suffering the loss of an arm."

He is laid to rest in Section 3. #MOHatANC

Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles commanded the III Corps at Gettysburg, a unit that was all but destroyed.  He received the M...
07/02/2020

Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles commanded the III Corps at Gettysburg, a unit that was all but destroyed.

He received the Medal of Honor “for extraordinary heroism on 2 July 1863, while serving with U.S. Volunteers, in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Major General Sickles displayed most conspicuous gallantry on the field vigorously contesting the advance of the enemy and continuing to encourage his troops after being himself severely wounded.”

He rests in Section 3. #MOHatANC

Wladimir Krzyzanowski, one of the most skilled “foreign” generals of the Civil War, was born in the Prussian/Polish city...
07/01/2020

Wladimir Krzyzanowski, one of the most skilled “foreign” generals of the Civil War, was born in the Prussian/Polish city of Raznova. When revolutions erupted across Europe in the 1840s, Krzyzanowski, like thousands of other young, idealistic soldiers, embraced democracy. When these revolutions were crushed, many—including Krzyzanowski--fled to the United States. When the Civil War broke out he offered his services to his new country, and the Army soon placed him in command of a brigade. At Gettysburg, his brigade deployed into action on the first day of the battle, July 1, 1863. Krzyzanowski’s men suffered losses of more than 50%. Still, Krzyzanowski’s leadership received praise, and he continued to serve until the end of the war. He is buried in Section 1 of Arlington National Cemetery.

Roy Stone led a brigade of three regiments at Gettysburg. Under his able leadership, the brigade distinguished itself in...
07/01/2020

Roy Stone led a brigade of three regiments at Gettysburg. Under his able leadership, the brigade distinguished itself in combat on July 1, 1863, despite crippling losses. Stone himself was seriously wounded in the hip and arm.

After the war, Stone worked as a civil engineer, and briefly returned to the Army during the Spanish-American War (1898), when he served in Puerto Rico. He is buried in Section 2 of Arlington National Cemetery.

On July 1, 1950, the first U.S. ground troops entered the Korean War. After North Korea invaded South Korea on June 25, ...
07/01/2020
Not Forgotten: The 70th Anniversary of the Korean War at ANC

On July 1, 1950, the first U.S. ground troops entered the Korean War. After North Korea invaded South Korea on June 25, 1950, the United States committed air and naval power, followed by ground forces, to a United Nations multilateral force under the aegis of the UN. Although President Harry S. Truman did not seek a declaration of war from Congress, nearly 1.8 million Americans served in Korea, during three years of brutal conflict ended only by an armistice signed on July 23, 1953. The Korean peninsula remains divided.

In the United States, Korea has often been called the “forgotten war,” overshadowed in collective memory by World War II and Vietnam. At Arlington National Cemetery, however, the Korean War will never be forgotten. To honor and remember those Americans who served and sacrificed in the war, check out our 70th anniversary blog post, which highlights Korean War memorials and selected gravesites at the cemetery. Read about the “Borinqueneers,” General Omar Bradley, Medal of Honor recipient Don Faith, Jr., Pulitzer Prize-winning war reporter Marguerite Higgins and more.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War (1950-1953)—the United States’ first major military conflict after World War II and, amid the escalating Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, the nation’s first major test in its effort to stop the global spread...

George H. Wanton received the Medal of Honor for actions on June 30, 1898, at the conclusion of the Battle of Tayacoba. ...
06/30/2020

George H. Wanton received the Medal of Honor for actions on June 30, 1898, at the conclusion of the Battle of Tayacoba. He was serving with Troop M in the all-black 10th U.S. Cavalry in Cuba when he joined three other privates - including Dennis Bell - for a fifth rescue mission that had been forced to retreat four times.

His citation reads: "The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private George Henry Wanton, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 30 June 1898, while serving with Troop M, 10th U.S. Cavalry, in action at Tayabacoa, Cuba. Private Wanton voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts at rescue had been frustrated."

Master Sgt. Wanton is laid to rest in Section 4. We honor his service. #MOHatANC

On June 30, 1898, Dennis Bell was serving in Cuba with Troop H of the 10th Cavalry Regiment - one of the original Buffal...
06/30/2020

On June 30, 1898, Dennis Bell was serving in Cuba with Troop H of the 10th Cavalry Regiment - one of the original Buffalo Soldier regiments - during the Spanish-American War. American forces aboard the Florida dispatched for reconnaissance and were left stranded onshore when Spanish scouts discovered them. Pvt. Bell, along with three other privates, launched a successful mission and rescued the surviving members of the landing party. All four privates were awarded the Medal of Honor.

His citation reads: The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Private Dennis Bell, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism on 30 June 1898, while serving with Troop H, 10th U.S. Cavalry, in action at Tayabacoa, Cuba. Private Bell voluntarily went ashore in the face of the enemy and aided in the rescue of his wounded comrades; this after several previous attempts at rescue had been frustrated.

Cpl. Bell is laid to rest in Section 31. We honor his service. #MOHatANC

Address

1 Memorial Avenue
Arlington, VA
22211

Arlington National Cemetery is located across the Memorial Bridge from Washington, D.C., on the Virginia side of the Potomac River. Memorial Avenue, which is intersected by the George Washington Memorial Parkway at a traffic rotary, connects Memorial Bridge to the cemetery gates. Memorial Avenue ends at the entry court of the Women in Military Service for America Memorial. Arlington Cemetery Metro Station Metro The Arlington National Cemetery Station is located on the Metropolitan Washington D.C. Area Metrorail's Blue Line. There is also a Metrobus stop on Memorial Avenue. Information on the hours of operation, schedules and fares for the Metrorail and Metrobus are available at www.wmata.com. The cemetery is also a stop on most tour guides itineraries.

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