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29th Infantry Division Archives

29th Infantry Division Archives We're the official repository of historical documents and artifacts related to the 29th Infantry Division since 1917. NOTE: Visitation by appointment only!

The 29th Infantry Division Archives contains one of the most valuable collections in the United States of historical material related to a US Army division in World War II. It is located in the Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore MD.

Operating as usual

I have great news for all of us devoted to the 29th Division. For the first time in its 102-year history, joining the 29...
12/31/2021
Membership 2022 Application

I have great news for all of us devoted to the 29th Division. For the first time in its 102-year history, joining the 29th Division Association is free and open to all interested parties! Free membership is available to anyone devoted to the history and legacy of our beloved 29th -- uniformed servicemembers, veterans, or civilians. You'll receive a very fine journal, "The Twenty-Niner," three times per year, as well as the monthly "Chin Strap" newsletter. You'll find fascinating historical articles, photos, and news of the current 29th Division. And best of all -- did I already mention this? -- joining is free and open to all! 29, Let's Go! Here is the link... https://29thdivisionassociation.com/membership2022/

Joining the 29th Division Association is FREE for all Applicants in 2022. As our membership ranks grow so will the strength of our Association's Voice! Thank you for your support and keeping our long, proud history alive. Should you wish to join a local Post, submit the form and you will be contacte...

Eighty years ago today, on February 3, 1941, President Roosevelt called the 29th Division into federal service for a per...
02/03/2021

Eighty years ago today, on February 3, 1941, President Roosevelt called the 29th Division into federal service for a period that was not supposed to exceed one year. It turned out to be nearly five. No one yet realized it, but for those men leaving their civilian jobs and reporting to local armories that morning, it would be the pivotal event of their lives. In Maryland, the "February 3" men, as they used to be known, gathered annually in the Pikesville Armory to commemorate their 1941 mobilization, but now, as far as I know, there is not a single one left. They certainly left us a better world. 29, Let's Go!

We have lost another great 29er. Arden Earll, a D-Day veteran of Company H, 116th Infantry, and a native of Erie PA, die...
11/29/2020

We have lost another great 29er. Arden Earll, a D-Day veteran of Company H, 116th Infantry, and a native of Erie PA, died yesterday. He was a wonderful friend and a dedicated veteran, who traveled back to Normandy several times and was a regular attendee at 29th Division reunions. He will be greatly missed. 29, Let's Go.

Please join me on Sunday, July 18, 2020 at 0830 (Eastern Time) for a discussion on the 76th anniversary of the liberatio...
07/11/2020
Battle for Saint-Lô - Part 1

Please join me on Sunday, July 18, 2020 at 0830 (Eastern Time) for a discussion on the 76th anniversary of the liberation of my "home away from home," the lovely French city of St. Lo. The event will include livestreaming with cameras at all the key battle sites related to the liberation of the city.

https://youtu.be/Nuwz0k_xRp8

On the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Saint-Lô we bring you two shows. Part 1 will cover the assault towards the town in early-mid July. For Part 1 we...

Today is the 75th anniversary of the tragic death of this great 29er, PFC Henry Slade Harrell, who died on a lonely foot...
02/23/2020

Today is the 75th anniversary of the tragic death of this great 29er, PFC Henry Slade Harrell, who died on a lonely footbridge spanning the Roer River near Julich, Germany on February 23, 1945. George Silk, one of the most renowned photographers of WWII, followed close behind Harrell on the footbridge, and the subsequent photo Silk snapped of Harrell's lifeless body, published in the March 12, 1945, edition of Life Magazine, became one of the most iconic photos of WWII. For 65 years, the anonymous soldier lying on the bridge was unidentified, but with the help of 29th Division veterans and the voluminous records of the 29ID Archives, I figured out Harrell's identity in 2010. A 20-year-old native of Sunflower, Alabama, the red-headed Slade Harrell was a high school standout academically and athletically. His "II-C" draft classification - "men necessary for farm labor" - could have kept him out of uniform, but he chose to serve, and ended up a key member of Company C, 175th Infantry, the first 29ID unit to storm over the Roer on February 23, 1945. He died exactly one year after he entered military service and is buried in his hometown of Sunflower. He embodies the selfless spirit of his generation, who sacrificed everything for a better world. A great soldier and an even greater human being who will never be forgotten.

Holiday crawl at the Fifth Regiment Armory
12/18/2019

Holiday crawl at the Fifth Regiment Armory

Maj. Warner was a member of the 110th Field Artillery of the 29th Division for many years before he left the Maryland Na...
09/21/2019

Maj. Warner was a member of the 110th Field Artillery of the 29th Division for many years before he left the Maryland National Guard to join the Regular Army. Although he never served a day in combat with the 29th Division, he was one of the greatest soldiers in the history of the division. 29, Let's Go!

Today on #NationalPOWMIARecognitionDay, we honor and remember the hardships endured by our nation's POW and those identified as MIA.

U.S. Army Maj. Everett L. Warner, who served in the Maryland National Guard for 14 years and was a Johns Hopkins University alumni, led American and Filipino units against Japanese forces during WWII with amazing ingenuity and cunning guerrilla warfare tactics.

In 1942, he was forced to surrender after being cut off from the rest of the Army. He was held as a POW until 1945, when he died aboard a Japanese vessel that was attacked repeatedly by American bombers.

Thank you to Maj. Everett for your sacrifice and service to this great country. #YouAreNotForgotten

To learn more about Maj. Everett's story and the history of the #MDNG, visit the newly opened Maryland Museum of Military History at the Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore.

Please take a look at this announcement from the 29th Division Association. Anyone who cares about the history of this g...
08/25/2019
29th Division Association – To keep alive the spirit that never knew defeat; to glorify our dead, and to further keep before our country, the record of the 29th Division in all wars.

Please take a look at this announcement from the 29th Division Association. Anyone who cares about the history of this great military unit should join the Association. It is open to anyone, and costs only 12 bucks a year. The Association was formed exactly 100 years ago by 29th Division doughboys returning from France, and has existed continuously since. 29, Let's Go!

To keep alive the spirit that never knew defeat; to glorify our dead, and to further keep before our country, the record of the 29th Division in all wars.

The horse favored to win the Kentucky Derby this Saturday is named "Omaha Beach." Please cheer him on!
05/01/2019

The horse favored to win the Kentucky Derby this Saturday is named "Omaha Beach." Please cheer him on!

02/27/2019

David Ginsburg
Today at 8:26 AM
All of us in this group love the 29th Division and the sacrifices they made to this country. One of the best ways to ensure their story always gets told is to be a member of the 29th Division Association. The Association is literally the brotherhood for veterans, soldiers, descendants and friends of the 29th to ensure their story always gets told. It takes 5 minutes to join. Joe Balkoski has been the National Historian for the Association for years. The Association creates documentaries, holds ceremonies, performs Final Salutes for fallen veterans and donates to organizations like the 29th Archives, the 116th Museum, and the National D-day Memorial. Please help us keep the story of the 29th alive. It is literally $12 per year and the Twenty-Niner magazine (three times per year) is worth far more than that. 29THDIVISIONASSOCIATION.COM

Then and Now... In the black and white photo, you can see members of Baltimore's Own 175th Infantry (5th Maryland), 29th...
02/14/2019

Then and Now... In the black and white photo, you can see members of Baltimore's Own 175th Infantry (5th Maryland), 29th Division, marching down to the shore in Cornwall, England, to board ships for the D-Day invasion, just a few days in the future. The color photo shows what this exact site looks like today.

01/03/2019

Last week one of our interns, Ethan Freeman, discovered a Great War 29er's copy of Battery E of the 110th Field Artillery whilst cataloguing our library. Printed in Baltimore in 1919, the volume's owner inscribed his name and left some snaps of his home and ship overseas, the S.S. Keemun. 18 year old Pvt. Gordon T. Schwamb of 1728 Poplar Grove St. Baltimore enlisted in the MDNG in August 1917 served abroad from June 1918 - May 1919 with the 29th Div AEF, and was honourably discharged on 6 June 1919.

29th Infantry Division soldiers, past and present (including some D-Day veterans), standing on Vixen Tor, the famous roc...
12/16/2018

29th Infantry Division soldiers, past and present (including some D-Day veterans), standing on Vixen Tor, the famous rocky hill on Dartmoor, UK, for which the division commander's jeep (currently on display at the Maryland Museum of Military History) was named.

Joe Balkoski retires after more than 34 years of service
10/16/2018
Joe Balkoski retires after more than 34 years of service

Joe Balkoski retires after more than 34 years of service

On Sunday, October 14, at the Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore, family and friends gather to give a special thanks to Joe Balkoski who retires after more than 34 years of service. He has been the Maryland National Guard’s Command Historian and Director of the Maryland Museum of Military History....

100th anniversary of Pvt. Henry Costin's Medal of Honor! Henry (known by his family as Gilbert) was a member of Company ...
10/10/2018

100th anniversary of Pvt. Henry Costin's Medal of Honor! Henry (known by his family as Gilbert) was a member of Company H, 115th Infantry, 29th Division.

In yesterday's Lexington (Kentucky) Herald Leader, there was a story about the recent Duck Boat disaster in Missouri tha...
07/23/2018
How World War II amphibious ‘Duck’ vehicle evolved into a tourist staple

In yesterday's Lexington (Kentucky) Herald Leader, there was a story about the recent Duck Boat disaster in Missouri that quoted parts of my first book, "Beyond the Beachhead." I described in some detail the catastrophe that occurred on D-Day at Omaha Beach when the Duck Boats (actually "DUKWs") attempted to operate in rough seas when landing the 111th Field Artillery Battalion of the 29th Division. Eleven of the twelve guns belonging to the 111th were lost when the DUKWs swamped, with some loss of life. The DUKWs were known to be dangerous to operate when carrying heavy loads in rough water. https://www.kentucky.com/news/nation-world/article215332175.html

The history of the ‘Duck’ boat reaches back to the 1940s, when U.S. troops needed a vehicle that could handle both water and land. Duck boats have a history of safety issues dating from that time. Thirteen people were killed when one sank in Hot Springs, Arkansas, in 1999.

A famous sculpture in memory of some World War I 29ers...
06/26/2018

A famous sculpture in memory of some World War I 29ers...

Photos from U.S. Army Center of Military History's post
06/20/2018

Photos from U.S. Army Center of Military History's post

06/14/2018

Thank you to Mission BBQ for helping us celebrate the Army birthday.

06/08/2018

For some reason I am not allowed to post pdf files on the 29th Infantry Division Archives page, but I am allowed to post them on the 29th Infantry Division Archives "Group" page. So I have recently posted onto the Group page an extremely rare interview performed in March 1945 with members of Company C, 116th Infantry, concerning their D-Day activities. Company C was one of the first 29th Division units to fight its way off Omaha Beach on D-Day. If you want to examine the document, please join the 29th Infantry Division Archives Group page, if you're not a member already. Thanks.

On National Public Radio today... http://wypr.org/post/omaha-beach
06/08/2018
"Omaha Beach"

On National Public Radio today... http://wypr.org/post/omaha-beach

On June 6th, 1944, soldiers from Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, members of the 29th Division, were among the first soldiers to land at Omaha Beach

05/28/2018

In honor of all those that gave their lives for our country, the 29th Division Association salutes you.

In the annual "Best of Baltimore" supplement to the Baltimore Sun, the Maryland Museum of Military History was named the...
04/17/2018
Best of Baltimore 2018: Arts and activities

In the annual "Best of Baltimore" supplement to the Baltimore Sun, the Maryland Museum of Military History was named the "Best Overlooked Museum" in Baltimore and was named a "rare gem" in the city. The 29th Infantry Division Archives is located in the museum. Click on the link below and scroll down until you find the listing!

http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/best-of-baltimore/bs-fe-best-of-baltimore-2018-arts-20180312-story.html#nt=oft09a-2gp1

From best free activity to best music video, Baltimore Sun staffers pick their favorites for 2018 in the arts and activities category.

04/15/2018

Carry on the legacy!

04/08/2018

THE TRAGIC STORY OF LT. MILTON MACKALL, A WWI 29er: Lt. Milton Mackall was a member of Company K, 115th Infantry, 29th Division, in World War I. We recently came across this amazing story about Mackall, written by a WWI nurse who cared for him at the Fort McHenry Hospital: "Milton was wounded severely in the Meuse-Argonne offensive, was sent to the AEF hospital on October 15, 1918, and came to us at Fort McHenry Hospital on April 8, 1919. His condition demanded him remaining at the Fort, for he lived his hospital life in a bathtub, He was taken out of the tub and placed in a wheelchair and out in the sun on clear days. Levi Curtis was his favorite attendant. Milton answered his last roll call July 27, 1922. Of sunny disposition, making friends readily, always grateful for little favors, he was devoted to Curtis and Curtis to him. There were, besides his family and friends, one regular visitor, three or four times each week, for years. A tall, attractive girl, blond, with a cheery smile, who had once been engaged to Milton before he went overseas. He funeral took place from the Chapel, and the hospital personnel and all the patients who were ambulatory lined both sides of the walks from the Chapel to the Gate, while all stretcher cases that were not strapped to the beds were along the roadway. The attendance was the most precious symbol that proved the handclasp of understanding among service friends and especially patients in veterans' hospitals. This blond girl I spoke of stood alone, between two attending brother officers. She married about five years ago, and in reverence for a good friend, they have named their first boy child Milton Barkley Mackall Smith."

A couple of years ago, we made an astounding discovery in the 29th Division Archives. What looked like a simple piece of...
02/28/2018

A couple of years ago, we made an astounding discovery in the 29th Division Archives. What looked like a simple piece of dirty white linen turned out to be the actual blindfold used to cover the eyes of a German naval officer when he was brought into 29th Division lines to conduct surrender negotiations at the siege of Brest on September 18, 1944. In the two photos shown here, you can see a 29er carrying that blindfold, and then another 29er tying the blindfold around the German's head. The 29ers saved the blindfold as a souvenir, and six members of the 115th Infantry, including Maj. Tony Miller (seen at right in the first photo), signed it. It now holds a prominent place in the MD Museum of Military History in the Fifth Regiment Armory in Baltimore. Come see it!

Address

29th Division St, Fifth Regiment Armory
Baltimore, MD
21201

Maryland Transit Administration Light Rail "Cultural Center" stop; or Metro (subway) "State Center" stop.

General information

Administered by Joseph Balkoski, Historian, MDNG

Telephone

(410) 576-1496

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Comments

I have had the most amazing thing happen. Mike van den Dobblesteen from France notified me that my father's canteen from WWII was advertised for sale. Another man had purchased it, but after hearing it was my fathers, he told the seller to sell it to me. It's Home! It disappeared sometime after a 1993 event - apparently someone took it and sold it into the military collectible market. I wish it could talk so that I could find out who - I have my suspicions. It came with a "note from the family" that bore my signature, but I did not write it, and whoever did plagiarized my words from elsewhere [the note was fraught with misspellings]. But it is home were it belongs thanks to some amazing folks on the US Military Collectibles "Deal or No Deal" page. What are the odds of this happening? I am beyond ecstatic. I love a story with a happy ending! S/Sgt. Edward R. Elburn, 115th Infantry, 29th Division.
Me couna
Good Evening, I do so hope somebody can help me within this group. My Mother has tried fruitlessly to trace and find her father Robert Vayden Payne. She only knew he was from Virginia and he died 4 days before her 1st birthday. Her birthday is 20th August 1944. Through GITrace we have learned so very much and believe he served in the 29th inventary. If anybody can send me any information Re this division or where we could get photos, we would be for ever appreciative. Ann -Marie Rennie
I am trying to find out more about my oldest brothers birth father, a Robert Clarke Potter ? He was only 22 years old. He was in the 29th division, and the 110th AAA. He was wounded on June 24th or 25th and died two days latter on the 27th. "Pfc Robert Clarke Potter, of Battery "C" 110th AAA Bn, died in a field hospital on June 27, 1944, from wounds received in battle against the enemy during the big Normandie push two days prior to his death. " Apparently he got his Texas girlfriend pregnant in about late February/early March of 1943, and was shipped from Texas where he was apparently training, and had met his girlfriend, to elsewhere in the states. and then in Dec of 1943 he was shipped to England for Operation Overlord. So very likely he never knew he had a son. My parents adopted him at birth in late Oct of 1943. Any info would be greatly appreicated, even if it is just about Battery "C". I just discovered that this is my adopted brothers father via DAN, just two weeks ago. I am trying to compile as much info as I can for my brother, as a Christmas present.
Does anyone have definitive info on when the 115th IR went ashore at Omaha? I'm finding conflicting details. Any response or direction in clarifying would be greatly appreciated. My dad, 1st Sgt VR Schmalbach, was with Cannon Co 115th IR in June of '44 and originally with 110th FA at Pikesville Armory from 1937. Thanks in advance.
My father Corporal Charles James Herlihy Jr from Holyoke, Massachusetts served in the 29th Infantry WWII. Normandy, Middle Eastern African Theater, Central Europe, Ardennes, Rhineland. Distinguished Unit Award, Purple Heart and more. My hero. Want to know as much as I can. Unfortunately he passed on when I was a girl. I have so much to learn. Our local Veteran Agent is trying to help me. He is in an unmarked grave. Never had military honors at his burial in 1966 and never a marker or flag on his grave, ever.
I recently saw the picture of GIs returning from Europe to New York City on the RMS Queen Elizabeth. I know that my father, Staff Sergeant Charles William "Bill" Burgoon, Company H, 115th Infantry, 29th Division, returned to New York by ship. Does the archive have information on what ship brought Company H home?
My father, Charles Allen Adair, is on the far right, second row.
Followers of this group may be interested to know that the Stories Behind the Stars project to write stories of all the Americans who died on D-Day is more than have done. When the accompanying smartphone app is ready, anyone will be able to scan the fallen's name from any gravesite or memorial and get an immediate link to read his story. This will include all the 29th ID D-Day fallen.
My Dad, Major Merl1098 (TD) teaming up with the Virginia National Guard Soldiers assigned to the Norfolk-based 1st Battalion, 111th Field Artillery Regime… See Moree Preble served in the 29th Infantry in WWII. His CO was Col Bagby. I have a number of pictures of his group in Iceland in 1943 and later in France. I would like to locate the group which makes these photos of history available to others. I have a few names for some of the pictures; Capt, Tucker, Capt. Shilling, Capt Mitchmer (although i am not sure i am spelling them correctly) . I also have a 29th Infantry book my Dad obtained in the 1940's Press Enter to post. 29th Infantry Division Association, Norfolk Post 5
Final found this on my Dad's computer been looking for months now