Global Forum for Freedom and Justice

Global Forum for Freedom and Justice An international gathering place focused on education and understanding, placed upon the sacred soil that gave rise to the modern Civil Rights Movement.
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08/24/2020
John Hume and David Trimble: A Vision of Peace

Lord David Trimble received the Nobel Peace Prize with John Hume in 1998 for their efforts to bring a peaceful solution to the conflict in Northern Ireland. Listen as Lord Trimble discusses his methodical approach to revolutionary change:

“A less dramatic perhaps form of approach, but yet one that is absolutely essential, doesn't mean that you don't have principles that guide you and goals that you're working towards, but it does mean that you focus on what is practicable and what is realizable and that you have some respect for the medium with which you are working, which is other people and other particular situations, and you don't assume that you can remold humanity or change situations by dramatic gestures.

So the painstaking, methodical approach of the lawyer is, I think, actually a desirable thing, in life generally and particularly in political life, where people can quite often succumb to ideological views and to the belief that it is possible easily to produce revolutionary change, when, in fact, it's not.”

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000488332557

The John Hume and David Trimble story is one of more than 140 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#JohnHume #DavidTrimble #NobelPeacePrize #NorthernIreland

08/17/2020
John Hume and David Trimble: A Vision of Peace

These two remarkable men, from opposite sides of the 30-year "Troubles" in Northern Ireland, bravely reached across the divide and waged peace. They were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. John Hume, who died in August, 2020, was a Catholic civil rights and political leader. In a poll several years ago, he was voted the greatest person in Irish history. David Trimble was the leader of the Protestant pro-British Ulster Unionist Party. They talk here about the underpinnings of the brutal fighting that tore Northern Ireland apart, and they explain how and why they were able to negotiate a peace deal and begin the healing. They offer some important lessons to the rest of the world.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075#episodeGuid=998e2eeb-6cca-4adc-8a7c-21c3bb82a493

The John Hume and David Trimble story is one of more than 140 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#JohnHume #DavidTrimble #NobelPeacePrize #NorthernIreland

07/27/2020
Pitbull (Armando Christian Pérez): I'm Possible

He grew up on the tough streets of Miami in the 1980s, dealing drugs and learning how to survive. But this first generation Cuban-American took the stage name Pitbull, and became a wildly successful rapper and music producer, who has put out dance, pop & latin hits for the past twenty years. He calls himself a hustler, and talks here about how hard work and determination have been more important to his story than talent. And he describes the charter schools he helped start, to provide a better chance for kids low-income kids who face the same kind of challenges in life that he did.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075#episodeGuid=89c2cc5c-2311-421a-bfd3-868d86429ba6

The Pitbull story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#Pitbull #ArmandoChristianPerez #MrWorldwide #Mr305 #EEEEEYOOOOO

07/20/2020
Best of - John Lewis: The Spirit of History

“I believe in nonviolence as a way of life, as a way of living. I believe that this idea is one of those immutable principles that is nonnegotiable if you're going to create a world community at peace with itself. You have to accept nonviolence as a way of life, as a way of living. I thought I was going to die a few times.

On the Freedom Rides in the year 1961 when I was beaten at the Greyhound bus station in Montgomery I thought I was going to die. On March 7th, 1965, when I was hit in the head with a night stick by a State Trooper at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge, I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death but nothing but nothing can make me question the philosophy of nonviolence.”

In honor of Congressman John Lewis, who died of pancreatic cancer on July 17th, we are re-posting this episode, originally published in January, 2020. Lewis spent his whole life trying to get our nation to live up to its own ideals. He maintained faith and optimism about the future, and was inspired by the new generation of activists for racial justice. He was the son of a sharecropper, and tells the story here of how he grew up to become a legendary leader of the Civil Rights Movement and a 17-term Congressman from the state of Georgia. He describes his political and spiritual awakenings, and recounts how he learned to live fearlessly and non-violently, despite the many beatings and arrests he endured -- at lunch counter sit-ins and during the march from Selma to Montgomery. You'll hear archival sound from those events as well, and an excerpt of John Lewis speaking at the March on Washington when he was just 23 years old.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000485428774

The John Lewis audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#CongressmanJohnLewis #CivilRights

07/06/2020
Best of – Maya Angelou: Righteousness and Love

“It is said that the young people have become cynical. Darlings, let me tell you something… one of the saddest things in the world is to see a cynical young person. Because it means that he and she have gone from knowing nothing, to believing nothing. It is so sad.

We need you so desperately. Not enough adults have told you, ‘You are all we have. Everything we've done, negative and positive, has been for you. You are all there is for us.’ And not enough adults tell you that. But we should tell you that every morning, while you're brushing your teeth; while you're pulling on your jeans; while you're having your breakfast; while you're on the bus, on the streetcar, on the subway. Some adult should be telling you, ‘Darling, you're the best we've got, and we need you.’”

Maya Angelou took the harshest experiences in her life and turned them into words of triumph, justice and hope. Her memoirs and her poems told of her survival, and uplifted people around the world. Her first book, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," is a classic of American literature. Angelou's voice and the rhythm of her speech were absolutely unique. In this episode, which originally ran in December of 2016, you'll be reminded why she was one of the most inspiring figures of the past century, and why her voice is missed today more than ever.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000482832552

The Maya Angelou audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#MayaAngelou #IKnowWhytheCagedBirdSings #Poetry #CivilRightsActivism #NationalMedalofArts #PresidentialMedalofFreedom

06/29/2020
Orhan Pamuk and Carlos Fuentes: The Art of Fiction

Two world-renowned novelists, from different corners of the globe, talk about why they write. Orhan Pamuk, from Turkey, is a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Carlos Fuentes, who died in 2009, was one of the most celebrated Mexican authors of all time. When Pamuk was facing a prison sentence for expressing his views, Fuentes gathered a group of international literary heavyweights to intervene on his behalf. You'll hear both authors describe how they discovered the power of literature, and how their writing relies on a combination of dreams, magic and discipline.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075#episodeGuid=3fec348e-7ef2-45ca-82de-322e6ac772a5

The Orhan Pamuk and Carlos Fuentes audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#OrhanPamuk #Turkey #NobelPrizeinLiterature #MyNameisRed #TheRedHairedWoman #CarlosFuentes #Mexico #TheDeathofArtemioCruz #TerraNostra #TheOldGringo

06/15/2020
Bryan Stevenson and John Hope Franklin: Voices of Conscience

Both of these men grew up under segregation, 50 years apart, and each became an important force for truth and for justice. John Hope Franklin was a pre-eminent historian, whose scholarship focused on the central role of African-Americans in our national story. He was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. Bryan Stevenson is a human rights lawyer who fights on behalf of death row prisoners in the deep south. He's also the author of "Just Mercy" and is the founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. We hope you enjoy Stevenson’s American Academy of Achievement 2019 Summit symposium video featured here. Their talks, which you'll hear in this week's episode, are as pressing today as the day they were given. Perhaps more so.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075#episodeGuid=a47bb529-9a1d-4047-bf71-dafe7699c346

The John Hope Franklin and Bryan Stevenson audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#JohnHopeFranklin #PresidentialMedalofFreedom #PulitzerPrize #FromSlaverytoFreedom #BryanStevenson #JustMercy #EqualJusticeInitiative

06/08/2020
Best of - Coretta Scott King: The Courage to Dream

The United States seemed poised for a new day in 1963, when the March on Washington drew a quarter million people. And yet, throughout the intervening fifty-seven years, Martin Luther King Jr’s dream has remained elusive. George Floyd’s killing by police, two weeks ago, and the protests that have erupted in its wake, could not make that any clearer. Over the next several weeks, we will feature some of the extraordinary voices from the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s that are in the audio archive of the Academy of Achievement. Today, we bring you our episode on Coretta Scott King. It originally posted in January of 2016.

As Mrs. King says, she wasn’t just married to Martin Luther King Jr., she was married to the cause. Their partnership in life, in faith, and in the struggle for justice and human rights, changed the world. In this episode, Mrs. King describes her early aspirations in music, her courtship with Martin, and her courage in the face of violence.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000477151521

The Coretta Scott King audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#CivilRights #SocialJustice #Protests #MarchonWashington

05/18/2020
Lt. Michael Thornton and Lt. Tommy Norris: Portraits of Valor

In 1972, a U.S. Navy Seal Lieutenant Thomas Norris carried out one of the most dangerous and daring rescue missions of the war in Vietnam. Six months later, he would be rescued himself, in an equally dramatic manner, after being shot through the head. His rescuer was fellow Seal, Michael Thornton, a Petty Officer at the time, who had shrapnel wounds, but swam for three hours while carrying Norris, and a South Vietnamese commando. Both Norris and Thornton would go on to receive the Medal of Honor. They tell their remarkable war stories here - best friends, sitting side by side.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000474942560

The Lt. Michael Thornton and Lt. Tommy Norris audio story is one of more than 125 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#UnitedStatesNavy #NavySEALs #SEALteam1 #SEALteam2 #VietnamWar #MedalofHonor

04/29/2020
Dr. Jonas Salk

As scientists and doctors fight to develop a vaccine for Covid-19, we are filled with hope remembering times when medical innovation lead to astonishing breakthroughs. Today, we think back to April of 1955, when the burden of fear was lifted forever as it was announced that Dr. Jonas Salk had developed a vaccine against Polio. Listen here as Dr. Salk reflects on the three stages of truth in his discovery of the Polio vaccine.

"There are three stages of truth. First is that it can't be true—and that's what they said. You couldn't immunize against polio with a killed-virus vaccine. Second phase—they say, well, if it is true, it's not very important. And the third stage is, well, we've known it all along. And so, what you are describing is the process that you have to go through when you come up with an idea that has not yet been tried or tested. And so, I... while it is true that this involves personalities, it also involves different ways of seeing. And it was not a matter of a popularity contest, it was a matter of anything other than that my curiosity drove me to find out whether it could work or not."

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075?i=1000472768750

The Jonas Salk audio story is one of more than 100 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast platform.

#JonasSalk #PolioVaccine #Vaccines #SalkInstituteforBiologicalStudies Salk Institute

04/13/2020
Anthony Fauci: What It Takes episode

If Anthony Fauci was not on your radar before the Covid-19 pandemic, he certainly is now. Dr. Fauci is a lead member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, and a trusted daily presence in the news. Many now view him as America’s MD. What It Takes told the inspiring story of Dr. Fauci’s life and career in July of 2018. Under the circumstances, it seemed time for an encore:

This is the story of a remarkable doctor who, in 1981, became one of the first scientists to recognize that we were on the verge of a new and terrible epidemic - HIV/AIDS - and then devoted his career to understanding and finding treatments for it. Dr. Fauci has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS research ever since. Along the way, he also became the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), overseeing research into every frightening outbreak imaginable: Ebola, Plague, SARS, Zika, Anthrax, Malaria, Tuberculosis, Influenza, etc… He talks here to Nina Totenberg, for the Academy of Achievement, about growing up as the grandson of Italian immigrants, and about how an education in the classics prepared him for medical school. He recalls how he became a target of the AIDS activist movement, but turned out to be one their greatest champions. And he describes his relationship with presidents and lawmakers and the news media, throughout decades of medical crises.

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/what-it-takes/id1025864075#episodeGuid=a019dbcc-f03f-4443-887d-01bfd1020d72

The Anthony Fauci audio story is one of more than 100 What It Takes podcast episodes featuring personal life journeys and lessons of leadership from the most extraordinary achievers of our times. To hear more download on iTunes or your favorite podcast platform.

#AnthonyFauci #NationalInstituteofAllergyandInfectiousDiseases #NIAID #COVID19 #Coronavirus

04/06/2020
Bryan Stevenson

This week, we share with you a clip of Bryan Stevenson, Founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, addressing the American Academy of Achievement’s 2019 International Achievement Summit in New York City:

"And I think the great evil of American slavery wasn’t the bondage and the involuntary servitude, I think it was the narrative we created that black people aren’t the same as white people, they’re not as good as white people – they can’t do this, they can’t do that.

And we never confronted that narrative. We passed a 13th Amendment that talks about ending involuntary servitude, but it doesn’t say anything about ending that narrative of racial difference. And that’s why I’ve argued slavery didn’t end in 1865 it just evolved, it turned into a century where black people were lynched, pulled out of their homes, mutilated, and we didn’t talk about it."

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I am excited this institution is developing in Alabama--for our state, nation, and planet. Alabama has been a leader for patriotism and freedom initiatives--launched and led creating of National Veterans Day, cradle of the Civil Rights movement, and, now, we can lead and serve on Freedom to Flourish. This Global Forum can inspire better envisioning and planning for personal, interpersonal, and societal leadership. --David
Wayne, I need more info on the Institute.
The Global Institute for Freedom and Justice is part of a prospective Civil Rights Plaza in downtown Montgomery and the gateway to the newly developed U.S. Civil Rights Trail.