Mark Treyger

Mark Treyger Mark Treyger represents the 47th Council District. He is a former public school teacher and aide to Assemblymember Colton. For scheduling inquiries, please email your request to [email protected].

08/22/2021

On a positive note, a lost dog (a beige pitbull) that was reported to me last night around Kaiser Park was found safe this morning by the boardwalk. I appreciate the 60th Precinct’s partnership and community residents that were on the lookout most of the night into this early morning. Dogs, cats, and all pets are family! 🐾

08/22/2021

FYI

I will be checking out flood prone spots across the district today to report to NYC Emergency Management. If any resident in our community sees flooding, please email me location details to [email protected]

I’ve already contacted NYCHA about leaks in Carey Gardens and will follow up to ensure repair crews are sent.

And I’m in touch with Con Edison in the event of any outages.

The brunt of the storm moved further east, but we will still have rain and gusty winds today. A reminder that beaches are closed for swimming today and tomorrow.

Hope everyone is staying safe and dry.

Latest forecast from the National Weather Service as of 8pm:The projected path of the storm is moving slightly further e...
08/22/2021

Latest forecast from the National Weather Service as of 8pm:

The projected path of the storm is moving slightly further east towards the eastern end of Long Island and it is expected to make landfall tomorrow afternoon. The storm has also strengthened to a category 1 Hurricane with sustained winds of 80MPH along the eye of the storm. Although eastern Long Island will feel the brunt of the storm, NYC will still experience impacts of the storm, which it has begun to feel tonight. Impacts include rain, gusty winds, a projected storm surge tomorrow anywhere from 1 to 4 feet along NYC, which can exacerbate localized coastal flooding in certain flood prone areas. A reminder that beaches are closed tomorrow and Monday, especially with the increased danger of powerful rip currents.

I will remain in contact with NYC Emergency Management and Con Edison in the event of outages tonight and tomorrow as well as the potential for fallen trees and wires. Please be careful and feel free to email me any concerns or issues [email protected]

Latest update from the National Weather Service as of 2pm today.The projected path of the storm shifts towards eastern L...
08/21/2021

Latest update from the National Weather Service as of 2pm today.

The projected path of the storm shifts towards eastern Long Island, but NYC will still experience storm impacts such as rain, gusty winds, and the potential for localized coastal flooding. The path keeps shifting so I believe it is best to prepare even with the latest forecast showing an eastern shift. As previously mentioned, beaches are closed tomorrow and Monday for swimming. I remain in contact with NYC Emergency Management, other relevant agencies, and Con Edison and will share additional important updates.

11pm update from the National Weather Service.Projected path of the storm moving slightly further west towards central L...
08/21/2021

11pm update from the National Weather Service.

Projected path of the storm moving slightly further west towards central Long Island, which means very likely impacts to NYC in the form of gusty winds, heavy rain, and threat of localized coastal flooding later this weekend. A reminder that NYC’s public beaches are closed for swimming 8/22 and 8/23. I will remain in contact with NYC Emergency Management, other relevant agencies, and Con Edison and share additional important updates.

11pm update from the National Weather Service.

Projected path of the storm moving slightly further west towards central Long Island, which means very likely impacts to NYC in the form of gusty winds, heavy rain, and threat of localized coastal flooding later this weekend. A reminder that NYC’s public beaches are closed for swimming 8/22 and 8/23. I will remain in contact with NYC Emergency Management, other relevant agencies, and Con Edison and share additional important updates.

Latest information from Con Edison:“Con Edison is mobilizing extra crews to respond to any outages or other service prob...
08/21/2021
Report an Outage | Con Edison

Latest information from Con Edison:

“Con Edison is mobilizing extra crews to respond to any outages or other service problems that occur as Tropical Storm Henri moves through the area on Sunday. The company has secured 1,200 mutual aid workers to restore service to any customers who are affected by the storm.

While the track of the storm and severity of the impact of the New York area are still coming into focus, Con Edison is preparing for a worst-case scenario. A storm with heavy winds can knock trees and branches onto overhead lines and cause customers to lose service.

The rain and tides could also bring flooding to the area. Restoration of service due to flooding in the underground electric-delivery system involves several steps. Those steps include pumping water out of a facility, drying the equipment, testing the equipment, addressing any environmental concerns, and making sure the equipment can operate safely and reliably.

Con Edison urges members of the public to stay away from downed wires, as they may be live. If you see downed wires, report them to your local police department or Con Edison by calling 1-800-75-CONED. Do not touch downed wires with your hands or any object.

For your safety, Con Edison workers may guard downed wires until crews make repairs. Their personnel may be in unmarked cars but will always have Con Edison identification.

How to Report an Outage
The company is sending e-mails to customers to warn them of the storm and explaining that Con Edison will have extra crews on the job.

Customers can sign up for text alerts at coned.com/text. Customers can also report outages and check service restoration status at conEd.com/reportoutage or with Con Edison’s mobile app for iOS or Android devices, or by calling 1-800-75-CONED (1-800-752-6633).

Customers who report outages will receive updates from Con Edison with their estimated restoration times as they become available.

Restoration Plan
The priority for restoration will be critical customer facilities that have an impact on the public, such as mass transit, hospitals, police and fire stations, and sewage and water-pumping stations. Crews will then prioritize repairs that will provide power to the largest numbers of customers as quickly as possible, then move on to restore smaller groups and individual customers.

Information on outages and restoration times is available on the Con Edison outage map.

Safety Tips
If you see downed electrical wires, do not go near them. Report them to Con Edison and your local police department immediately.
Treat all downed wires as if they are live. Never attempt to move them or touch them with your hands or any object. Be mindful that downed wires can be hidden from view by tree limbs, leaves or water.
Members of the public also should avoid transformers that are brought to the ground. The transformers are gray metal drums attached to the wires and poles.
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installing and using a portable generator. Never plug a generator into a wall unit, use it indoors, or set it up outdoors near open home windows or air-handling vents.
If a power line falls on your car while you’re in it, stay inside the vehicle and wait for emergency personnel.
If your power goes out, disconnect or turn off appliances that would otherwise turn on automatically when service is restored. If several appliances start up at once, the electric circuits may overload.
Charge your cellphones and other mobile devices while you have power.
Check to make sure your flashlights and any battery-operated radios are in working order. Make sure you have a supply of extra batteries.”

Report problems with your electric service, such as a power outage, or partial, dim, or flickering lights. You'll receive updates automatically.

Latest message from NYC Emergency Management:NYC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT URGES NEW YORKERS TO PREPARE FOR POSSIBLE IMPACTS ...
08/21/2021
Notify NYC - Home

Latest message from NYC Emergency Management:

NYC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT URGES NEW YORKERS TO PREPARE FOR POSSIBLE IMPACTS OF TROPICAL STORM HENRI

The National Weather Service has issued a Tropical Storm Watch for NYC until further notice

The National Weather Service has issued a Storm Surge Watch for the Bronx and Northern Queens until further notice

Heavy rains and gusty winds could limit visibility and create difficult travel conditions into Monday

New York City beaches closed for swimming on Sunday and Monday

August 20, 2021 – The New York City Emergency Management Department urges New Yorkers to prepare for potential impacts of Tropical Storm Henri. According to the National Weather Service, there is the potential for very heavy rainfall and damaging winds that may flood roadways and reduce visibility to create hazardous travel conditions through the weekend. Storm impacts are forecast to begin late Saturday, before intensifying throughout Sunday into the afternoon. Residual impacts including showers with breezy winds will still be possible into Monday. The National Weather Service has issued a Tropical Storm Watch for the New York City area until further notice. A Tropical Storm Watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the possible onset of tropical-storm-force winds, which include sustained wind speeds of 39 mph to 74 mph.

A Storm Surge Watch also is in effect for parts of New York City including the Bronx and northern Queens until further notice. The combination of strong winds, dangerous storm surge and the tide may cause normally dry areas to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline within the next 48 hours. New York City beaches will be closed for swimming on Sunday and Monday.

“Tropical Storm Henri is currently tracking up the northeast coast and may cause dangerous conditions throughout the weekend. NYC Emergency Management is working closely with City, state, and nonprofit and private-sector partners so we can respond to any impacts caused by the incoming storm,” said NYC Emergency Management Commissioner John Scrivani. “Though the storm is not expected to make direct landfall, New Yorkers should prepare for heavy rain, strong winds, and localized coastal flooding beginning as early as Saturday evening. Practice caution and avoid unnecessary travel. If you must travel, consider taking public transportation.”

New Yorkers should plan for difficult travel conditions and are advised to exercise caution and consider taking public transportation if they must travel. Those who can stay home during the storm are advised to stay indoors. Heavy rains may lead to potential flooding in low-lying areas throughout the city. If you are traveling, avoid flooded areas, turn on headlights, drive slowly, and exercise caution. Consider avoiding or delaying travel until flooding and heavy rain stop. Due to the hazardous travel conditions, people should allow extra travel time.

NYC Emergency Management remains in constant communication with the National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service to track and monitor Tropical Storm Henri and has taken several steps to prepare for potential impacts to the city. The City’s Emergency Operation Center and Situation Room have been activated, and NYC Emergency Management has coordinated daily interagency conference calls to facilitate preparations with City and state agencies, as well as nonprofit and private-sector partners. The City’s Flash Flood Emergency Plan has been activated to help mitigate potential flash flooding and ensure a quick, effective, and coordinated response to any flash flood events that do occur. The City’s Downed Tree Task Force has also been put on alert to coordinate the response to any potential large downed tree event.

Safety Tips

· If you live in a flood-prone area, keep materials, such as sandbags, plywood, plastic sheeting, and lumber on hand to help protect your home.
· If you have a disability or access or functional need, make sure your plan addresses how your needs may affect your ability to evacuate, shelter in place, or communicate with emergency workers. Arrange help from family, friends, or service providers if you will need assistance.
· When outside, avoid walking and driving through flooded areas. As few as six inches of moving water can knock a person over. Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control and possible stalling. One or two feet of water can carry away a vehicle.
· Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.
· If you see downed electrical wires, do not go near them. Never attempt to move or touch them with any object. Be mindful that tree limbs, leaves, or water can cover downed wires from view. Always stay away from downed power lines because they could be live.
· Report downed wires immediately. If a power line falls on your car while you are in it, stay inside the vehicle and wait for emergency personnel.

Power Outages

· To prepare for a possible power outage, charge cell phone batteries, gather supplies, and turn your refrigerator and freezer to a colder setting. If you lose power, items that need refrigeration will stay cooler for longer.
· Make sure your flashlights and any battery-operated radios or televisions are working. Keep extra batteries.
· If you lose power and have a disability, access and functional needs or use life-sustaining equipment (LSE) and need immediate assistance, dial 911.
· Do not use generators indoors.
· Check on friends, relatives, and neighbors, especially older adults and people with disabilities, access and functional needs, or health conditions. Help them to prepare if needed.

Prepare For Strong Winds

Strong winds can bring down trees and power lines and can turn unsecured objects into dangerous projectiles. To protect against the hazard of strong winds, New Yorkers should:

· Check the area immediately surrounding your home for unsecured objects or potentially dangerous conditions. Tree limbs, garbage cans, yard debris, or other materials that can be moved by the wind are potential projectiles aimed at your home or parked vehicle.
· Bring inside loose, lightweight objects such as lawn furniture, potted plants, garbage cans, garden tools and toys.
· Anchor objects that would be unsafe outside, such as gas grills or propane tanks.
· Close up and secure patio furniture.
· Secure retractable awnings.
· Remove aerial antennas and satellite television dishes.

Stay Informed

Before, during, and after an emergency, the City will send emergency alerts and updates to New Yorkers through various channels, including Notify NYC, the City's free, official emergency communications program. Sign up for Notify NYC to receive free emergency alerts and updates in your preferred language. Register for free to receive by visiting NYC.gov/NotifyNYC, calling 311 (212-639-9675 for Video Relay Service, or TTY: 212-504-4115), following @NotifyNYC on Twitter, or getting the free Notify NYC mobile application for your Apple or Android device.

7/19/2019 1:16:15 AM Notify NYC - Mass Transit Restoration Notification issued 07-19-2019 at 1:16 AM. Following a prior service disruption, LIRR train service has resumed in both directions. Expect residual delays. To view this message in American Sign Language (ASL), العربية, বাঙাল...

From the National Weather Service as of 5pm today:
08/20/2021

From the National Weather Service as of 5pm today:

From the National Weather Service as of 5pm today:

08/20/2021

FYI From NYC Emergency Management:

“Due to Tropical Storm Henri, a beach closure is in effect for all NYC public beaches on 8/22 and 8/23. Swimming & wading not permitted.”

I will continue to post additional information. I’ve already requested NYC DEP to come to our district to clean clogged catch basins, which always flood during storms, particularly west end of Coney Island and parts of Gravesend and Bath Beach. I’ve asked the Parks Department to post signage along the shore and creek as well as check on preparedness to address fallen trees and branches. I’ve reached out to Con Edison to check on their preparedness level as well.

I’ll continue to monitor this situation.
Folks with concerns or questions can always email me [email protected]

The New York City Council has a majority backing the call for a centralized remote learning option. Now with 28 Council ...
08/20/2021
De Blasio Pressed to Offer NYC Remote-School Option

The New York City Council has a majority backing the call for a centralized remote learning option.

Now with 28 Council Members including Speaker Corey Johnson Councilwoman Carlina Rivera 利華娜 Council Member Mathieu Eugene Council Member Francisco Moya Margaret S. Chin Council Member Antonio Reynoso Council Member Eric Dinowitz Council Member Vanessa L. Gibson Council Member Helen Rosenthal Diana Ayala Justin Brannan City Councilman Council Member Adrienne Adams Council Member Karen Koslowitz Council Member Carlos Menchaca Council Member Inez Barron Council Member Alan Maisel Council Member Selvena N. Brooks-Powers Council Member Ben Kallos Council Member Kevin C Riley Council Member Danny Dromm Council Member Darma Diaz Council Member Robert E. Cornegy, Jr. Councilwoman Alicka Ampry-Samuel-41st District, Brooklyn Councilman Rafael Salamanca, Jr. Council Member Farah N. Louis Council Member Peter Koo and Councilmember Oswald Feliz.

LETTER: https://tinyurl.com/3hkt9uwf

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-19/de-blasio-faces-blowback-to-reverse-nyc-s-no-remote-school-plan

Pressure is mounting on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to reverse his stance on a virtual option for students.

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