New York Transit Museum

New York Transit Museum The NY Transit Museum is a unique museum devoted to the impact of public transportation on the development of the New York metropolitan region.
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Visit us in Downtown Brooklyn, at our Gallery Annex at Grand Central Terminal, or our 2 Broadway store!

Operating as usual

In March of 1906, the Dyckman Street station opened as part of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue line’s extension. Durin...
01/19/2021

In March of 1906, the Dyckman Street station opened as part of the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue line’s extension. During the extension, it was the first completed station opened north of 157th Street to a temporary terminus at 221st Street. Originally serving only six-car trains, it was extended to accommodate ten-car trains in 1948. Over 60 years later, the station received renovations including rehabilitated tunnel portal and platforms, new lighting, and an elevator to the downtown platform.

These #NYTMCollection photographs document the Dyckman Street station’s tracks in 1946 and fare control area in 1962. Built above ground level, atop an embankment, it serves as a northern portal to the Washington Heights Mine Tunnel, which takes the Broadway-Seventh Avenue line through the bedrock of Manhattan.

01/19/2021
Transit Tots - Tuesday, January 19th, 2021

How many ways do we use numbers when we think about transit? In today’s Transit Tots, practice counting everything from subway cars to pizzas with a New York-themed picture book, and then apply that number know-how to some transit-related counting challenges!

Happy #MLKDay! Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s tireless leadership in the fight for civil rights forever guaranteed his pla...
01/18/2021

Happy #MLKDay! Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s tireless leadership in the fight for civil rights forever guaranteed his place in American history as a powerful activist, an influential orator, and a unifying voice for the disenfranchised. Today, we honor his life and legacy.

These #NYTMCollection photographs from the Frank English Collection depict commuters at Grand Central Terminal watching footage of Martin Luther King Jr. on MLK Day in 1989.

In April of 1973, M2 railcars entered service following the success of the Budd Company’s M1/M1A railcars. Nicknamed “Co...
01/17/2021

In April of 1973, M2 railcars entered service following the success of the Budd Company’s M1/M1A railcars. Nicknamed “Cosmopolitans,” the cars were constructed by General Electric, the Budd Company, Canadian Vickers, and Avco for Penn Central’s (present-day MTA Metro-North Railroad) New Haven line. The fleet phased out all vintage EMU cars from the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. Although similar in style to M1/M1A cars, the electric self-propelled M2 cars featured unique differences, such as red exterior striping and New York and Connecticut state seals on its interior walls. They also featured air-conditioning, wider seating, and double-paned windows.

Between 2012 and 2018, M2 cars were phased out by new M8 railcars. Taken in 2013 by Patrick Cashin, this photograph shows an M2 train passing through the West Haven station during its last years in service. What’s your favorite retired MTA Metro-North Railroad railcar fleet?

#DidYouKnow that the Mother Clara Hale Depot, located in Harlem, was originally a trolley barn operated by the Metropoli...
01/17/2021

#DidYouKnow that the Mother Clara Hale Depot, located in Harlem, was originally a trolley barn operated by the Metropolitan Street Railway? Built in the 1890s for the Lenox Avenue line, it was modified as the 146th Street Bus Depot in 1939 and rehabilitated in 1990. Three years after its rehabilitation, the depot was renamed to honor Mother Clara McBride Hale, a humanitarian and activist who founded the Hale House Center - New York, NY. These #NYTMCollection photographs depict the trolley barn and lines leading to the barn before its modification into a bus depot.

In January of 2009, NYC Transit began demolition to rebuild the old bus depot for modern bus operations. Testing and commissioning activities started in March 2014, and the project was completed in November 2014. It is NYC Transit’s first LEED certified bus depot, featuring a green roof, rainwater collection capabilities, and more energy efficient additions. Have you visited this depot on a #NYTransitMuseum members-only tour?

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1958, the rebuilt Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue station opened as a subway station on the IN...
01/16/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1958, the rebuilt Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue station opened as a subway station on the IND Rockaway Line. Originally a surface level Long Island Rail Road station opened in 1869, the Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue station serves today as the southern terminal station for the A train and is the easternmost station in the New York City subway system. Following Superstorm Sandy, the Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue station was again rebuilt and improved. The new, steel and glass, state-of-the art transit facility includes "Respite," a glass panel, jewel-toned artwork by Jason Rohlf that was commissioned by MTA Arts & Design.

Taken by Felix Candelaria and Rob Wilson, these photographs show the Far Rockaway – Mott Avenue station after rebuilding in 2012. Have you used this station during a commute?

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1916, an extension of the BMT Fourth Avenue line opened, with three stations serving the ...
01/15/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1916, an extension of the BMT Fourth Avenue line opened, with three stations serving the Bay Ridge neighborhood in Brooklyn: Bay Ridge Avenue, 77th Street, and 86th Street. The debut of the stations, served by what is now the R line, sparked housing and development booms throughout the area, transforming Bay Ridge into the vibrant neighborhood that it is today.

These two images show the corner of 4th Ave and 84th Street in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. The first image, from the #NYTMCollection, was taken as part of a survey project just before the line opened. The second shows the same intersection over a century later!

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1911, the 191st Street subway station opened on the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line in...
01/14/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1911, the 191st Street subway station opened on the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line in Washington Heights, #Manhattan. Served today by the 1 train, the 191st Street station is the deepest station in the NYC Subway system at approximately 180 feet (55 meters) below street level.

These #NYTMCollection photos from our Subway Construction Photograph Collection documents construction of the 191st Street Station in March of 1910. Have you visited this station recently?

Manufactured by Bombardier, the M7 and M7A railcar fleet entered service on the Long Island Railroad and MTA Metro-North...
01/13/2021

Manufactured by Bombardier, the M7 and M7A railcar fleet entered service on the Long Island Railroad and MTA Metro-North Railroad in the early 2000s. With an order of 1,172 cars, the fleet phased out M1/A railcars used for both railroads. Nearly identical in design, M7/A cars were arranged in married pairs and constructed as two individual models for the Metro-North and Long Island Railroad’s unique signaling and electrical arrangements. In addition, M7 railcars feature black and yellow front exteriors, while M7A railcars sport blue front exteriors with white stripes on the bottom.

Taken by MTA photographer Marc A. Hermann, this photograph shows an M7A train in November of 2020. Can you identify more differences between the LIRR’s M7 and Metro-North’s M7A railcars?

#TodayinHistory: Taken #OnThisDay in 1901, this #NYTMCollection photograph documents the masonry and steel construction ...
01/12/2021

#TodayinHistory: Taken #OnThisDay in 1901, this #NYTMCollection photograph documents the masonry and steel construction of the Manhattan Railway Company's 74th Street Powerhouse. At the turn of the 20th century, the construction of the powerhouse ushered in a new era that enabled the transition from steam locomotives to cleaner electric trains, fundamentally improving conditions in New York City. Prior to the switch, smoke, cinders and soot from steam-powered elevated trains plagued Manhattan, blackening the air and dirtying the streets.

Do you know who operates the power station today?

Taken in July of 1974, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows passengers boarding bus 8680 at Hamilton Place and Broadway...
01/11/2021

Taken in July of 1974, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows passengers boarding bus 8680 at Hamilton Place and Broadway in Manhattan. Modeled TDH-5303, Bus 8680 was one of 682 buses ordered to replace the antiquated vehicles acquired by the city when it took over the bankrupt Fifth Avenue Coach Company’s lines in 1962. The General Motors series was the first fleet of New York City buses designed and built with air-conditioning. These buses also featured large illuminated advertising signs on each side.

Retired in 1990, a few TDH-5303 models are preserved in the #NYTransitMuseum’s vintage bus fleet. Have you explored any of these buses? Post a photo of your favorite vintage bus in our fleet below!

January is the perfect month to stay inside for some family time. Available at the #NYTransitMuseum Store, this #NYCsubw...
01/11/2021

January is the perfect month to stay inside for some family time. Available at the #NYTransitMuseum Store, this #NYCsubway map puzzle is a fun and entertaining way to teach your toddlers the letters and numbers of NYC’s mass transit system. Together, you’ll piece together the five boroughs and learn about our city.

Shop all puzzles and games at nytransitmuseumstore.com/kids/toys-trains/puzzles-games.html.

In March of 1919, the 9th Avenue station’s lower level opened on the BMT Culver line, connecting to the BMT’s Fourth and...
01/10/2021

In March of 1919, the 9th Avenue station’s lower level opened on the BMT Culver line, connecting to the BMT’s Fourth and Fifth Avenue lines. The station was used by the line until 1954, when the main section of the Culver line route was taken over by the Independent Subway System via the Culver Ramp. Culver trains were then truncated to a shuttle between Ninth Avenue and Ditmas Avenue, with stations at 13th Avenue and Fort Hamilton Parkway. The Culver Shuttle, designated by the SS route indicator, ran until May of 1975, when it was discontinued.

This #NYTMCollection photograph shows a Culver Shuttle train at the 9th Avenue station’s lower level in April of 1975. Although the Fort Hamilton Parkway and 13th Avenue stations were demolished in the mid-1980s, the 9th Avenue station’s lower level remains unused, as the upper level is served by the D train.

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1863, the first underground railway train made its inaugural journey between Paddington a...
01/10/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1863, the first underground railway train made its inaugural journey between Paddington and Farringdon in London, England. Trains on the London Underground (commonly referred to as the “Tube”) were originally gas-lit wooden steam locomotives before electric cars were introduced to the system in 1890. New York’s electrified subway system followed in 1904.

Check out these photos of the London Transport Museum’s vintage fleet! Have you visited London Transport Museum? What was your favorite exhibit?

Built by the St. Louis Car Company, the first ten R-29 subway cars entered service on the 7 line in April of 1962. Inten...
01/09/2021

Built by the St. Louis Car Company, the first ten R-29 subway cars entered service on the 7 line in April of 1962. Intended to serve only the 7 line, the cars were transferred to the 1 line the next month, replacing existing IRT Low-Voltage cars. R-33 WF and R-36 WF subway cars were then ordered for the line, in preparation for the 1964 World’s Fair. Similar to R-26 and R-28 subway cars, the fleet was entirely equipped with air conditioning in 1982 and was the first to be painted a bright tartar red. Between 1985 and 1987, R-29 cars were rebuilt as Redbirds by Morrison Knudsen, and split into two groups as Westinghouse and General Electric cars. During the end of their service life, they were also referred to as R-99 under their overhaul contact.

This #NYTMCollection photograph portrays R-29 subway car #8582 on the Broadway – Seventh Avenue line in the 1960s. In 2001, the cars were gradually retired, making their final trip in October of 2002. Which lines do you remember riding R-29 subway cars on?

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1908, the IRT Borough Hall station opened. It was the first subway station to open in Bro...
01/09/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1908, the IRT Borough Hall station opened. It was the first subway station to open in Brooklyn and served as the terminal for the extension of the Lexington Avenue Line from lower Manhattan. Although a separate fare was required, the new station offered easy access to the BRT Fulton Street El and the Myrtle Avenue El. Today, both IRT Eastern Parkway Line platforms at Borough Hall retain their original terra-cotta wall reliefs and name tablets. On the mezzanine level, visitors can see a plaque commemorating the first subway station in Brooklyn.

This #NYTMCollection photograph from the Lonto-Watson Collection depicts the first IRT train to Brooklyn Borough Hall on January 10th, 1908. Do you use this station on your daily commute? Many #NYTransitMuseum staff members have – it’s just a few blocks from the Transit Museum!

Manufactured by General Motors Corporation in 1957, #NYTMCollection Bus 7144 ran on Brooklyn and Queens routes between 1...
01/08/2021

Manufactured by General Motors Corporation in 1957, #NYTMCollection Bus 7144 ran on Brooklyn and Queens routes between 1957 and 1971. Modeled 5106, it was one of the first series of New York City buses to be equipped with hard seats. The bus operated out of Jamaica Depot until 1963, when it was transferred to the 126th Street Depot, and then Flushing Depot in 1967.

In 1971, it was transferred to Flatbush Depot, where it was retired from service that same year. What’s your favorite vintage bus from the #NYTMCollection?

#DidYouKnow that the R-6 subway cars were constructed by three different manufacturers as separate orders? Divided into ...
01/07/2021

#DidYouKnow that the R-6 subway cars were constructed by three different manufacturers as separate orders? Divided into different versions, R6-1 cars were manufactured by the Pressed Steel Car Company, R6-2 by Pullman Standard, and R6-3 by the American Car and Foundry Company. Part of over 1,000 nearly identical cars delivered under the contracts R1-9, they were built as follow-ups to the R-4 fleet and featured two front windows, as opposed to the R-4s one window. In addition, the cars had rattan seats, paddle ceiling fans, incandescent light bulbs, and roll signs for passenger information. During their service lives, R-6 cars served IND lines until the 1960s-70s, when they were used on BMT lines and phased out by the R-44 and R-46 fleet.

Retiring in 1977, a variety of R-6 cars have been preserved as part of the #NYTransitMuseum’s vintage fleet. This #NYTMCollection photograph from the Vincent Lee Collection shows an R-6 car exterior in front of a train shed. Can you identify which R-6 model it is?

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1994, Automated Fare Collection (AFC) turnstiles went online at the Wall Street and White...
01/06/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1994, Automated Fare Collection (AFC) turnstiles went online at the Wall Street and Whitehall Street subway stations. Designed by Cubic, the development of an automated fare card for the New York City transit system began with a pilot program in 1987. When the turnstiles debuted, tokens were still the preferred fare media, so they had a token slot in addition to a magnetic card reader. By 1997, every subway station was equipped with these turnstiles, and in May of 2003, subway tokens were discontinued, ushering in the era of the MetroCard.

MetroCard magnetic card readers function efficiently because MetroCards are swiped by the customer, unlike other transit systems, which pull in fare cards and expel them on the other side. Fewer moving parts makes for a longer life for this equipment and lower maintenance costs. As MTA New York City Transit rolled out One Metro New York (OMNY), these turnstiles were re-fitted with near field communication, and optical bar code electronic smart card and mobile device validators.

These photos show AFC turnstiles at the Church Avenue and Westchester Square stations, and one a part of the #NYTMCollection! What’s your favorite turnstile model?

Taken in the 1970s, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows a Skyliner double-decker bus at the General Grant National Mem...
01/06/2021

Taken in the 1970s, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows a Skyliner double-decker bus at the General Grant National Memorial (Riverside Park) in Manhattan. This bus was in service for one day as a preview to the Leyland double-decker buses that began service in 1976. Do you remember the double-decker buses?

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1918, the BMT Broadway Line was extended north from 14th Street – Union Square to Times S...
01/05/2021

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1918, the BMT Broadway Line was extended north from 14th Street – Union Square to Times Square – 42nd Street and south from Prince Street to Rector Street. New stations opened at 23rd Street, 28th Street, 34th Street – Herald Square, Canal Street, City Hall, Cortlandt Street, Rector Street, and Whitehall Street. While Whitehall Street was used to reverse trains beginning on January 5, 1918, the station did not open until mid-September of the same year. The extension of the line provided additional means of transportation to Times Square, and a new connection to Brooklyn. Express service via the Broadway line also began, with Sea Beach and West End trains that had previously run local now running as express trains.

These #NYTMCollection survey photographs depict Broadway and Spring Street in 1912, Union Square in 1913, and Canal Street in 1914, before and during construction of the BMT Broadway line.

01/05/2021
Transit Tots - Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Do you know the story of the secret subway, the very first subway train in New York City? In today’s Transit Tots, discover how this train was moved by something called pneumatic power. Then, conduct a science experiment to explore pneumatic power at home and learn a new song all about this secret subway.

In January of 2010, this #NYTMCollection art card titled “All Around Town,” was installed in 2,800 New York City subway ...
01/04/2021

In January of 2010, this #NYTMCollection art card titled “All Around Town,” was installed in 2,800 New York City subway cars as part of the MTA’s Arts for Transit Program, known today as MTA Arts & Design. Designed by Béatrice Coron, the artist specializes in paper cutting used in artist books, illustrations, and public art.

Shop Coron’s “All Around Town” and more MTA Arts & Design art cards at nytransitmuseumstore.com/books-prints-media/posters-prints/subway-car-art-cards.html.

Opened in 1878, the Kings Highway station on the BMT Brighton line was originally a part of the Brooklyn, Flatbush and C...
01/04/2021

Opened in 1878, the Kings Highway station on the BMT Brighton line was originally a part of the Brooklyn, Flatbush and Coney Island Railroad. After 1883, the line was renamed the Brooklyn and Brighton Beach Railroad and later acquired by the BRT. Rebuilt in 1908, the station consists of four tracks and two offset island platforms with two original mezzanines that were rebuilt in the 1980s. In the late 1940s, another station entrance was constructed to accommodate more passengers.

This #NYTMCollection photograph documents construction of the Kings Highway station’s tracks over the passageway of the new entrance in November of 1949. Can you identify the subway car-type at the station?

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99 Schermerhorn Street
Brooklyn, NY
11201

Located at 99 Schermerhorn Street Brooklyn, NY 11201, and accessible by over 20 subway and bus lines.

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About the New York Transit Museum

Found in 1976, the New York Transit Museum is one of only a few museums in the world dedicated to telling the story of urban public transportation. The Museum collects, exhibits, interprets, and preserves the history, sociology, and technology of public transportation systems in the New York metropolitan region, and conducts research and educational programs that make our extensive collections accessible and meaningful to a broad audience.

The Transit Museum is committed to preserving the stories of the people behind transportation – the extraordinary engineers, the workers who labored in the tunnels over 100 years ago, the communities that were drastically transformed, and the ever-evolving technology, design, and ridership of a system that runs 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Housed underground in an authentic 1936 subway station in Downtown Brooklyn, the Transit Museum’s main location spans a full city block, with a working platform that is home to a rotating selection of twenty vintage subway and elevated cars dating back to the early 1900s. Between our main location and our Gallery at Grand Central Terminal, the Transit Museum welcomes more than half a million visitors every year.

Transit Museum visitors can explore the vintage cars, sit at the wheel of a city bus, step through a time tunnel of turnstiles, and explore changing exhibits that highlight the cultural, social and technological history — and future — of mass transit.

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Comments

This is the MaBSTOA 132nd Street garage and shop in the mid 1970's. 132nd-133rd streets west of Broadway in Harlem.
how do you access the virtual nostalgic train show?
Have you been on the subway?? Then I want to hear from you! The Subway Portraits Podcast features stories from people's experiences riding on NYC's subway. Episodes contain stories told by riders that range from interesting, horrifying, hilarious, and all that's in between. Check out the show and potentially share your story.
N train R68A
N train R68
N train R68
anyone know the type of car this is?
Q train r68a
Q train r68a
Q train r68a
Q train r68a
S.O.S New York Transit museum. My son (pictured below with "the best gift ever!" from his grandmother's trip to the big apple) has a birthday and Christmas coming up. He is mindblowingly enamoured with the MTA system. I'm dying to get him some stuff from the museum store but only issue is we live in Toronto, Canada. I can ship his gifts from my family's house in Yonkers but the online store doesn't let me use a Canadian Credit card. Can anyone help? I have 11-13 business days left! It would make 2020 the best year ever if I could get it to him.