University at Buffalo School of Law's Innocence & Justice Project

University at Buffalo School of Law's Innocence & Justice Project UB Law's Innocence & Justice Project is a legal clinic that began through the work of John Nuchereno, Esq. and Professor Charles Ewing.

The Innocence & Justice Project, a new initiative of the law school's Advocacy Institute, was founded in 2015. The current Supervising Attorneys' and Directors of the project are Jon Getz, Esq. and Gary Muldoon, Esq. The Innocence & Justice Project includes a select group of 2L's and 3L's, who work to identify cases in which there is strong evidence of a miscarriage of justice and, in their role as student attorneys, press the case for redress. The Innocence & Justice Project takes on two different types of cases: (1) those claiming that they did not commit the crime of which they were convicted, and (2) those who were not afforded the due process of law.

Exoneration Project
11/17/2017
Exoneration Project

Exoneration Project

BREAKING: We will join Nevest Coleman’s family at Hill Correctional Center to pick him up on Monday, early afternoon. This marks the first Thanksgiving in 23 years that Nevest will spend with his family. Nevest was exonerated by DNA evidence in May. The Conviction Integrity Unit of the Cook County State's Attorney's office just agreed to drop the charges against Nevest and his co-defendant Darryl Fulton, pending retrial. No physical evidence ties either man to the 1994 murder for which they were arrested 23 years ago. DNA tested in May from the victim's fingernails and underwear hit to a serial rapist as yet identified by the CCSAO.

"The new rules will require judges presiding over criminal trials to issue an order notifying and reminding prosecutors ...
11/13/2017
Chief Judge DiFiore implements new measures in criminal cases | Brooklyn Daily Eagle

"The new rules will require judges presiding over criminal trials to issue an order notifying and reminding prosecutors and defense attorneys of their duties to the court.

This includes orders to prosecutors responsible for the case to timely disclose exculpatory evidence favorable to the accused, which is also known as 'Brady material,' in reference to the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Brady v. Maryland."

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/articles/2017/11/9/chief-judge-difiore-implements-new-measures-criminal-cases

Chief Judge DiFiore implements new measures in criminal cases

BBC News
06/11/2017
BBC News

BBC News

US man who spent 17 years in jail for a crime he did not commit speaks of his relief that his lookalike was found.

The New York Times
05/26/2017
The New York Times

The New York Times

"I wrote letters to people I didn't even know. I just knew that one day — I didn't know when — that I would be a free person."

05/21/2017

Congratulations to our Graduating Members: Brian Barnes, Matthew Paris, Farina Mendelson, Kelly Pettrone, and Taylor Baker. Keep fighting the good fights.

The New York Times
04/28/2017
The New York Times

The New York Times

A resolution extended a “heartfelt apology” for their mistreatment and wrongful convictions and urged Florida's governor to grant them full pardons.

04/25/2017

Discussing the Innocence and Justice Project with the Erie County Bar Association, Criminal Law Committee.

"In 1990, a teenager was convicted of murdering his parents. Forced into a confession by homicide detectives, Martin Tan...
04/25/2017
The Real Story with Maria Elena Salinas Season 1, Episode 1 | Watch FREE Now! - Investigation Discovery

"In 1990, a teenager was convicted of murdering his parents. Forced into a confession by homicide detectives, Martin Tankleff spent twenty years trying to prove his innocence."

https://www.investigationdiscovery.com/tv-shows/the-real-story-with-maria-elena-salinas/full-episodes/confessions-of-an-innocent-man

The Real Story with Maria Elena Salinas Season 1 Episode 1 - Confessions of an Innocent Man. Stream the Full Episode FREE with your TV Subscription. Watch Now on investigation discovery.com!

Tonight at 10! Watch the incredible Exoneration Story of, friend of the Innocence & Justice Project, Marty Tankleff. htt...
04/24/2017
Teenager Convicted Of Murdering Parents Spent 20 Years Trying To Prove Innocence - The Real Story with Maria Elena Salinas | Investigation Discovery

Tonight at 10! Watch the incredible Exoneration Story of, friend of the Innocence & Justice Project, Marty Tankleff.

https://www.investigationdiscovery.com/tv-shows/the-real-story-with-maria-elena-salinas/videos/teenager-convicted-of-murdering-parents-spent-20-years-trying-to-prove-innocence?sf72731931=1

In 1990, a teenager was convicted of murdering his parents. Forced into a confession by homicide detectives, Martin Tankleff spent twenty years trying to prove his innocence.

More on yesterday's important decision in Nelson v. Colorado http://www.scotusblog.com/2017/04/opinion-analysis-states-c...
04/20/2017
Opinion analysis: States can’t keep money they collect pursuant to subsequently overturned convictions - SCOTUSblog

More on yesterday's important decision in Nelson v. Colorado

http://www.scotusblog.com/2017/04/opinion-analysis-states-cant-keep-money-collect-pursuant-subsequently-overturned-convictions/#more-254940

Sometimes, it’s hard to tell what a Supreme Court decision is about, or what the court has held, until well into the majority opinion. And then there are examples like Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s opinion for the Court in Nelson v. Colorado, which opened with the following concise paragraph: When

04/19/2017
UBLawIJP (@UBLawIJP) | Twitter

We are now on Twitter! Check us out!

https://twitter.com/UBLawIJP

The latest Tweets from UBLawIJP (@UBLawIJP). The Innocence and Justice Project. Only project in NYS, outside NYC, working to free those who have been wrongfully convicted, and to raise community awareness. Buffalo, NY

“The convictions pursuant to which the state took petitioners’ money were invalid,” [Ginsburg] wrote, “hence the state h...
04/19/2017
States Can’t Keep Criminal Fines of Exonerated, Supreme Court Rules

“The convictions pursuant to which the state took petitioners’ money were invalid,” [Ginsburg] wrote, “hence the state had no legal right to retain their money.”

By a 7 to 1 vote, the justices struck down a Colorado law that required people cleared by the courts to file civil suits and prove their innocence.

"The scandal led drug labs around the country to re-examine their protocols, said Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., the director o...
04/19/2017
Chemist’s Misconduct Is Likely to Void 20,000 Massachusetts Drug Cases

"The scandal led drug labs around the country to re-examine their protocols, said Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., the director of the Criminal Justice Institute at Harvard Law School, which has some clients who are affected by the scandal"

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/18/us/chemist-drug-cases-dismissal.html?_r=0&mtrref=query.nytimes.com&gwh=F2A531EE7504A4FBE92D6E7CEEE6323D&gwt=pay

The American Civil Liberties Union and public defenders were examining legal documents from local prosecutors to determine which cases were tied to the chemist.

04/18/2017

Interested in joining us on the Innocence and Justice Project?

Remember, you MUST enroll in Law 812LEC "Wrongful Convictions" (Tuesday/Thursday 6-7:30pm) for the Fall Semester.

". . . post-conviction DNA exonerations of inmates will inevitably dwindle to almost nothing; many of the DNA cases that...
04/14/2017
Abundance of DNA evidence not enough to prevent wrongful convictions

". . . post-conviction DNA exonerations of inmates will inevitably dwindle to almost nothing; many of the DNA cases that generate headlines concern prisoners convicted years ago. But a decline in DNA exonerations will not signify that the system has become error-proof. Rather, the factors that initially gave rise to those wrongful convictions will remain and infect criminal cases that lack biological evidence suitable for DNA testing at all. Only an estimated 10 to 20 percent of criminal cases have testable biological evidence at all; what's more, that evidence is often lost, destroyed, or degraded over time. So, I think we need to capitalize on the lessons learned from the DNA era to reform the underlying sources of error for all cases."

https://m.phys.org/news/2017-04-abundance-dna-evidence-wrongful-convictions.html

As we enter an era in which DNA evidence is routinely used in criminal investigations, errors that led to wrongful convictions—including mistakes later corrected with DNA tests—may seem to be fading into history. This, however, isn't true, says law and criminal justice professor Daniel Medwed, who e...

Wrongful Conviction
04/12/2017
Wrongful Conviction

Wrongful Conviction

Season 2, Episode 10: Mistaken Identity: The Wrongful Murder Conviction Of Franky Carrillo is now posted

Listen here: http://bit.ly/2g1G25S

Francisco Carrillo Jr. was convicted and sentenced to life in prison in 1992 in the fatal drive-by shooting of Donald Sarpy in Lynwood. Mr. Carrillo, who was 16 at the time of the 1991 shooting, maintained his innocence through two trials and in prison. His conviction relied on eyewitness testimony from six people. Mr. Carrillo said that a gang of corrupt and racist Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies -- known as the "Lynwood Vikings" coerced and threatened key witnesses into identifying him in a photo lineup. In 2011, a judge overturned his conviction after witnesses later admitted they did not have a view of the shooter, and instead had been influenced by police officers, and each other, to identify Mr. Carrillo. Two men since confessed to the crime, and stated Mr. Carrillo was not involved. Since his release, Mr. Carrillo has gotten married, started a family and obtained a bachelor’s degree from Loyola Marymount University. He received a $10 million settlement from LA County in 2016 and is currently planning on running for State Assembly in California.

http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Wrongfully-Convicted-Killer-Celebrates-Freedom-142700255.html

04/05/2017

Are you interested in applying to be on the Innocence and Justice Project in your Second and Third Years at UB?

Please be advised that in order to be eligible to apply you MUST enroll in Law 812LEC "Wrongful Convictions" (Tuesday/Thursday 6-7:30pm) for the Fall Semester.

Please see any of our members with questions.

03/23/2017

We are both excited and honored to announce that we are attending the 2017 Innocence Network Conference in San Diego, California this weekend! We cannot wait to meet and hear from the exonerees.

11/03/2016
Exoneree’s story moves School of Law audience

On behalf of the IJP, it was truly an honor meeting and speaking with exoneree, Marty Tankleff. Marty's story is one of tragedy and triumph. Marty's remarkable story reminds the members of IJP exactly why we are here, doing what we do. Thank you Marty!

Six Thousand Three Hundred and Thirty Eight Days. That’s how long Marty Tankleff spent in prison after he was convicted as a teenager in 1990 of killing his parents in their Long Island home.

11/03/2016
New directors for Innocence and Justice Project

New directors for Innocence and Justice Project

Two SUNY Buffalo Law alumni with extensive experience in the criminal courts have been chosen to lead the Law School’s Innocence and Justice Project.

Law School’s Innocence and Justice Project is launched
11/03/2016
Law School’s Innocence and Justice Project is launched

Law School’s Innocence and Justice Project is launched

After the conviction and the appeals are over, John Nuchereno says, most convicted persons find themselves without a lawyer. Typically they have no money, and most lawyers know little about post-conviction remedies. They may plead with the court to look at their case again, but usually those pleas a...

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418 O'Brian Hall
Buffalo, NY
14260

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