Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex We administer five units of the Refuge System: Bear Lake, Grays Lake, Camas, and Minidoka Refuges, and Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production Area.

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) NOTICEDuring the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at ...
04/01/2020
USFWS - FWS Public Health Update

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) NOTICE

During the current public health emergency, whenever possible, outdoor recreation sites at national wildlife refuges will remain open to the public. For now, refuge visitor centers and other public facilities may be closed and most scheduled events have been postponed.

For local conditions review the information on this website and call ahead.

If visiting one of our locations, please ensure public health and safety by following guidance from the CDC and state and local public health authorities. You can do this by maintaining social distancing, avoiding overcrowding and exercising good hygiene. For more information: https://fws.gov/home/public-health-update.html

Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Many pintails have been passing through SE Idaho over the last couple weeks
03/27/2020

Many pintails have been passing through SE Idaho over the last couple weeks

Northern pintails have already paired up and are migrating north to summer breeding grounds. Watch for them getting ready to nest on seasonal wetlands and shortgrass prairies.

Photo: Northern pintail pair by Georgia Hart/USFWS.

Happy #WorldWaterDay.  Eagle Creek, Camas Creek, the Snake River, Oxford Creek, and the Bear River are just some of the ...
03/22/2020

Happy #WorldWaterDay. Eagle Creek, Camas Creek, the Snake River, Oxford Creek, and the Bear River are just some of the waterways that are important to Refuges on our Complex.

Happy birthday to the National Wildlife Refuge System!
03/15/2020

Happy birthday to the National Wildlife Refuge System!

Today we’re giving a big 117th birthday s/o to the National Wildlife Refuge System! 🎂🥧
•••
Did you know: There’s at least one national wildlife refuge in every state. Today’s Refuge System includes more than 560 national wildlife refuges, 38 wetland management districts and 5 marine national monuments. Enjoy some tranquil scenes of refuges throughout the U.S. and some of the species who call them home.❣️ Learn more: http://ow.ly/Pz0r50yM0i3 #LiveYourWild
•••
Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico courtesy of Kim Yang Dessoliers (sharetheexperience.org)

Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Florida by Carol Grant, USFWS permit

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska by USFWS

Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge in Rhode Island courtesy of Chris Hunter (sharetheexperience.org)

Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in California by USFWS

03/13/2020

Happy #AmeriCorps week! We have been fortunate to have #AmeriCorps members on our Refuges each summer since 2017. They are invaluable in achieving our habitat and monitoring goals during our field season. We are looking to hire more AmeriCorps members for the 2020 field season and applications are currently open. Message us if you have questions or would like the links to apply!

03/05/2020

The thermometers around southeast Idaho are starting to stretch for the spring. Temperatures near 50 at lower elevations and in the 40’s at higher elevations are the warmest in a number of months in our area. What migratory species are you looking forward to seeing in the near future?

While there may still be snow on the ground, signs of spring are starting to emerge!  This flock of Red-winged Blackbird...
02/28/2020

While there may still be snow on the ground, signs of spring are starting to emerge! This flock of Red-winged Blackbirds was seen this week on the east side of the Mud Lake unit of Bear Lake NWR as the sun was setting.

Photo Credit: Jeremy Jirak/USFWS

It's #NationalInvasiveSpeciesAwarenessWeek!  Managing invasive species is a large part of what staff do on our refuges. ...
02/27/2020

It's #NationalInvasiveSpeciesAwarenessWeek! Managing invasive species is a large part of what staff do on our refuges. Cheatgrass, Leafy Spurge, Canada Thistle, Phragmites, Curlyleaf Pondweed and Common Carp are some of the invasives that impact our Refuges. We use a suite of techniques to manage them, thereby practicing integrated pest management. If you are interested in helping track invasive species you can download the EDDMapS app on your phone. Visit www.eddmaps.org for more information. Also, always remember to clean, drain, and dry your gear while recreating to help stop the spread of invasive species!

02/26/2020
Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuges

Check out the cheeks on this critter in Oregon!

Western Pocket Gopher shows off its pockets

This little rodent, a Western (Mazama) Pocket Gopher, was spotted foraging alongside the trail at Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. This species can be found between the coast and the Cascades, with few moving furthing east than the mountain range.

The gopher gets its name from the fur-lined cheek pouches used to transport plant material. These "pockets," obvious in the video, are over-stuffed with plant food the gopher collected before darting back into its hole.

Footage by Lila Bowen

Good reminder from our friends at Idaho FWO.
02/23/2020

Good reminder from our friends at Idaho FWO.

The Idaho Junior Duck Stamp Program is in full flight for 2020! All K-12 students are welcome to participate in this free program that connects conservation to the arts. Entries due March 15, 2020.

Will your artwork be the face of the next Junior Duck Stamp???? 🦆🎨

More: http://ow.ly/w1ey50xQzzf

Our water year in Southeast Idaho is looking good so far!
02/12/2020

Our water year in Southeast Idaho is looking good so far!

Snowpacks across most of the Pacific Northwest are getting back to normal after being very low at the start of winter.
Much of the Cascade Range is from 75% to 150% of the normal snowpack level for this time of year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This date in December the same readings indicated between zero and 50% snowpack levels.
East of the Cascades most of the readings indicated 100% or higher, even up to 175% in northeast Oregon.
The readings come from sensors spread across the region by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, or NRCS, a branch of the USDA.
The percentages represent a snow-water equivalent based on the historical median from 1981 to 2010.
The lowest readings, indicated by dark red dots, are found in the Klamath Basin of south-central Oregon.
More mountain snow is expected later in the week, according to the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) office in Portland.
See the full interactive map ➡ http://ow.ly/QXgq50yivdw

❄ Oregon weather alerts: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/or.php?x=1
❄ Washington weather alerts: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/wa.php?x=1
✅ Snow storm and extreme cold safety tips from Ready.gov: https://www.ready.gov/winter-weather
✅Winter weather tips, in English and Spanish, from the NWS: https://www.weather.gov/safety/winter
🚗 Oregon road cameras: https://www.tripcheck.com/
🚙 Washington road cameras: https://www.wsdot.com/traffic/
❄ Pacific Northwest winter photos: https://goo.gl/hbyz3m

Happy Birthday USFWS!
02/09/2020

Happy Birthday USFWS!

Sunday Funday, because it’s U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s birthday! On February 9, 1871, the U.S. Fish Commission was established, and this is where it all began. Learn about our history of establishment: https://fisheries.org/2017/02/happy-birthday-to-usfws/

Photo: Canada goose at Seedskadee and Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuges by Tom Koerner/USFWS

Happy #WorldWetlandsDay!  Our Refuges in Southeast Idaho have a diversity of wetland types which are a result of differe...
02/02/2020

Happy #WorldWetlandsDay! Our Refuges in Southeast Idaho have a diversity of wetland types which are a result of differences in depth, duration, frequency, and timing of flooding. While many of our wetlands are currently iced, they will soon look like the photo below. Whether you want to get outside this winter or are waiting for the spring, we look forward to seeing you soon on our Refuges!

Ever wonder about movements of some of the Rough-legged Hawks in our area?
01/25/2020

Ever wonder about movements of some of the Rough-legged Hawks in our area?

Special thanks to collaborators Bryan Bedrosian and the Teton Raptor Center for assisting with several RLHA transmitter deployments. Tracking data from their deployments are shown below.
For more information on their great work (education, research and rehabilitation) visit
https://tetonraptorcenter.org

Additional invasive annual grasses besides cheatgrass are showing up in the intermountain west that threaten our native ...
01/11/2020
Sage Grouse Initiative

Additional invasive annual grasses besides cheatgrass are showing up in the intermountain west that threaten our native sagebrush steppe habitat type.

You've probably heard of cheatgrass, but what about medusahead and ventenata? These two annual invasive grasses are even worse than cheatgrass, and they're showing up on more acres across the West. With help from NRCS, Wyoming is working to get ahead of this serious threat to productive rangelands. Fast, coordinated, and thoughtful action, just what WY is doing, is the best way to halt the spread of these damaging invasives.

Interesting history from the Gray’s Lake Area!
01/10/2020

Interesting history from the Gray’s Lake Area!

#GraysLake is a cool area with a unique history so today on #ThrowbackThursday we are going to explore this area. The Grays Lake Ranger Station acreage was withdrawn on June 18, 1908. This ranger station area covered 75 acres. In 1914, an additional 40 acres were added to the site because that land possessed desirable forage during the grazing season. Shortly after this withdrawal, the Forest Service improved the site and made it the District #2 headquarters for the Caribou National Forest. This station served as the headquarters until at least 1926.

The Forest Service improved the site in 1910 with a five-room house ($490), a 36’ x 40’ log barn ($279), an 18’ x 20’ shed ($126), and a 25-foot deep well ($101). Nearby, the Forest Service fenced a horse pasture with two miles of four-wire barb-less fence ($167). In 1913, 25 acres were plowed for crops to support the ranger station and by 1914, a telephone line connected the station to the Supervisor’s Office in Montpelier and the Snake River Ranger District on the Palisade National Forest. Later improvements included a blacksmith shop in 1928, described as a round galvanized iron building with a galvanized roof and concrete floor, and a one-mile enclosure used as a horse pasture in 1930.

A. E. “Gene” Briggs was the Grays Lake District Ranger from 1924 to 1927. In his memoirs, he recalled:

The station improvements consisted of a 4-room log dwelling, sided with channel siding and painted mineral red; the Forest Service standard color at the time. A lean-to addition served as a kitchen and dining room. One room served as an office and was equipped with an office desk, typewriter, a filing case for the District records, a map case, and other office supplies. The dwelling was well insulated against wind and cold. It needed to be because of the high winds, deep snows and low temperatures during the long winter months. The dwelling had no modern plumbing and the source of water supply was a hand pump in a long building which also sheltered the fuel wood supply, tools, equipment, and a workshop. A large two-story log barn, appearing somewhat dilapidated, provided storage for hay for saddle and pack horses and shelter for the horses during the long, cold winter months. It also sheltered our Chevrolet coupe and other equipment. We referred to the barn as the “monstrosity.” This seemed to be a fitting description for the old building at first. We later realized the value and necessity of the building as a shelter from the wind and drifting snow during periods of 10 to 20 degrees, or even 40 degrees below zero temperatures.

In 1927, District 2 (Grays Lake) was combined with District 1 (Idaho Falls). Although the Grays Lake Ranger Station was no longer a district headquarters, it was still an important administrative site. New
Deal funding and labor in 1933-34 facilitated the construction of several new buildings. They included an R4 Plan 7 guard station ($2,000), an R4 Plan 11 four-horse barn ($1,200), an R4 Plan 23 garage ($700), and an R4 Plan 70 outhouse.

The Forest Service trends of consolidation and post-war recycling affected the Grays Lake Guard Station in the 1950s. The garage was moved in 1953 to a new dwelling site at 290 East 200 North in Soda Springs, Idaho. In 1955, the unimproved 40 acres in one portion of the ranger station site were released from withdrawal since they were outside the forest boundary and had not been used for years. The remaining withdrawn lands were relinquished in 1969. In 1971, the Bureau of Land Management wished to acquire the Grays Lake Guard Station, but this request apparently was denied. By the mid-1980s, the Forest Service proposed to phase out the use of the Grays Lake Guard Station and declare the buildings as surplus or use them as trading stock for a new office. These included a three-room house, the barn, an outhouse, and an A-frame building added to the site in 1984. After standing vacant for more than twenty years, the Forest Service transferred the site and its buildings to the US Fish and Wildlife Service in March of 1995.

Happy #NationalBirdDay everyone!  What is your favorite bird species?
01/05/2020

Happy #NationalBirdDay everyone! What is your favorite bird species?

Happy National Bird Day! No matter where you live, you probably see birds everywhere you go. They keep us connected to nature even from our backyard. If you want to learn about different bird species, go here: http://ow.ly/FQ9O50xMSkQ

Photo: Northern shovelers stretching in Colorado by Ray Fetherman

The Sagebrush in our area is important for many species of wildlife!
12/31/2019
Sage Grouse Initiative

The Sagebrush in our area is important for many species of wildlife!

We recently shared a cool storymap from NRCS Oregon about removing juniper trees to improve mule deer winter habitat. This awesome Ask an Expert with the President/CEO of the Mule Deer Foundation dives deep into how mule deer use sagebrush. It was one of our most popular posts of 2019. Enjoy!

Whichever holidays you choose to celebrate or not celebrate at this time of year, we at the Southeast Idaho National Wil...
12/25/2019

Whichever holidays you choose to celebrate or not celebrate at this time of year, we at the Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex, wish you and your family the best now and heading into the new year!

Beautiful photos of waterfowl in the winter.  Keep your eyes open for some of these birds and other species in open wate...
12/23/2019

Beautiful photos of waterfowl in the winter. Keep your eyes open for some of these birds and other species in open water pockets when out and about this winter.

Waterfowl in the winter! Are these birds not spectacular?

Photos courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Snowpack is slightly above average for some of our Refuges and slightly below average for others so far this winter seas...
12/22/2019

Snowpack is slightly above average for some of our Refuges and slightly below average for others so far this winter season. Snowpack is closely monitored throughout the winter and spring by our staff to help determine what kind of water we will expect to see in the spring.

Here is a look at the latest snowpack estimates across the Pacific Northwest!

Our recent storms definitely did help to boost our snow numbers. We have dug a pretty big hole so far though, and it will take much more to catch back up to normal.

Joint Ventures are important for bird and landscape conservation.  Our regional joint venture for the intermountain west...
12/20/2019

Joint Ventures are important for bird and landscape conservation. Our regional joint venture for the intermountain west just re designed their website. Check out the link to find out more about what they do!

After many months of planning and development, the IWJV is happy to announce the newly remodeled IWJV.org website is launched.

With a geography of 486 million acres, the IWJV’s web presence has long been an important way to stay connected with and inform our partners. The recent redesign of the website better portrays our diverse partnership philosophy and creates a space where partners can connect. Visitors to IWJV.org will also find improved organizational structure and functionality of the site.

Please explore our remodeled site and let us know what you think! https://iwjv.org/

The Refuge Complex had our holiday get together today.  One tradition that has been going on for 26 years now is potatoe...
12/18/2019

The Refuge Complex had our holiday get together today. One tradition that has been going on for 26 years now is potatoes brought to the staff by Farrel, our Equipment Operator at Camas NWR!

An anniversary worthy of celebration!
12/15/2019

An anniversary worthy of celebration!

Happy 30th! On this day in 1989, the North American Wetlands Conservation Act was passed. Since then, partners have conserved over 30 million acres--an area the size of Kentucky! That averages out to protecting a Delaware's worth of wetlands every year. You can learn more about some of the great projects that we've worked on over the years here: https://nawmp.org/nawca30

Not the best news from the Grand Canyon.
12/05/2019
White-Nose Syndrome in Bats

Not the best news from the Grand Canyon.

The fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) has potentially been detected on a fringed myotis (Myotis thysanodes) at Grand Canyon National Park. The bat was captured and sampled for the fungus in April 2019 during routine surveillance by park biologists. https://bit.ly/2Ph2EkN

11/28/2019
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family from all of us on the Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex!

Around 46 million turkeys will be consumed on Thursday. And each bird will be served along with a slew of sides like cranberry sauce, salad and pumpkin pie. And don't forget the wine!

Without pollinators, the meal (and possibly the conversation around the table) would be a lot more boring.

Video: A Thanksgiving meal set out and all side dishes vanish off screen.

Whether it is pulling bouys at Minidoka, hooking the snow blower up at Grays Lake, pulling electronic water level logger...
11/26/2019

Whether it is pulling bouys at Minidoka, hooking the snow blower up at Grays Lake, pulling electronic water level loggers at Camas, or pulling fish screens at Bear Lake, this time of year has our staff busy with winterization as the water on a lot of our wetlands begins to freeze and the snowfall increases.

Address

4425 Burley Dr, Ste A
Chubbuck, ID
83202

General information

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Opening Hours

Monday 07:30 - 16:00
Tuesday 07:30 - 16:00
Wednesday 07:30 - 16:00
Thursday 07:30 - 16:00
Friday 07:30 - 16:00

Telephone

(208) 237-6615

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Comments

I found this Common Loon above the dam on the south spillway at Lake Walcott today. Sadly, it has fishing line around it's bill. I don't know if there is any way for someone to catch it and get it untangled, but I am hoping so.
trumpeter swans..Camas NWR
northern harrier..Camas NWR
rough legged hawk at Camas NWR
these Sandhill cranes were so happy to back in Idaho they were dancing :) Camas NWR
this little guy stopped eating ,just to come over and say Hi ! Camas NWR
white-crowned sparrow..Camas NWR
red-winged blackbird..Camas NWR
pronghorn..Camas NWR
porcupine ..Camas NWR
American kestrel camas NWR
white-crowned sparrow..Camas NWR