NOAA NWS Ocean Prediction Center

NOAA NWS Ocean Prediction Center Facebook posts do not always reflect the most current information. For current official info, visit: https://ocean.weather.gov/ or https://weather.gov/

NWS will be using Facebook as a supplemental channel to disseminate environmental information and promote weather awareness activities including outreach and educational efforts.

Mission: The National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters and ocean areas, for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. NWS data and products form a national information database and infrastructure which can be used by other governmental agencies, the private sector, the public, and the global community. OPC strives to provide the world’s best marine weather decision support services, preventing loss of life and property at sea. Read our full vision and mission statement here: https://ocean.weather.gov/strategic_plan.php

As Hurricane Isaias tracked off the Southeastern US coast and along the Eastern Seaboard, forecasters from the National ...
08/07/2020

As Hurricane Isaias tracked off the Southeastern US coast and along the Eastern Seaboard, forecasters from the National Hurricane Center’s Tropical Analysis Forecast Branch (NHC-TAFB) and OPC delivered accurate and timely weather information to help guide safety decisions of the maritime community. These graphics highlight vessel avoidance as Isaias approached, and then moved across the offshore waters. #MarineWx

New Story Map! Linked below is a summary of extratropical hurricane force low pressure systems across the North Atlantic...
08/06/2020
2019/20 North Atlantic Hurricane Force Wind Events

New Story Map! Linked below is a summary of extratropical hurricane force low pressure systems across the North Atlantic basin during the 2019/20 season (June 1 to May 31). The Story Map includes interactive maps, satellite imagery, and statistical info:

https://arcg.is/8PerX

Highlighting the North Atlantic hurricane force (HF) wind event season from June 1, 2019, through May 31, 2020.

07/31/2020
Hurricane Isaias

Animated below is GOES-16 visible imagery showing #Hurricane #Isaias from 1806-2116 UTC. Per the @NHC_Atlantic 2100 UTC advisory, maximum sustained winds are 75 mph, and movement is NW at 15 mph. Find more information here: https://nhc.noaa.gov/?atlc #marinewx

07/17/2020
Gale Force Conditions off Northern California Coast

Gale force conditions in the coastal and offshore waters are initiating with the tightening pressure gradient between an inland low and high pressure centered offshore. In the animation below you will see gale force (yellow & orange) conditions are expected through 21z Sun #PacWx #MarineWx

NOAA's Ocean Prediction Centers salutes our nation's maritime industry!The nation’s maritime shipping industry is a 2.1 ...
05/22/2020
National Maritime Day | MARAD

NOAA's Ocean Prediction Centers salutes our nation's maritime industry!

The nation’s maritime shipping industry is a 2.1 trillion dollar economic activity for the U.S. and making accurate and reliable weather forecasts at sea is economically critical. NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center delivers life and property saving forecasts around-the-clock each day to mariners at sea in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

To find more information on how the OPC plays a role in the maritime industry, click on the following link:

https://www.weather.gov/news/181213-protecting-lives

Each year on May 22 our country celebrates National Maritime Day.

The 1200 UTC Meteosat-11 visible satellite image and the 12Z OPC E Atlantic surface analysis show a rare late season pur...
05/21/2020

The 1200 UTC Meteosat-11 visible satellite image and the 12Z OPC E Atlantic surface analysis show a rare late season purely extratropical hurricane force low pressure system west of Europe. The 1140 UTC Metop-A Ascat wind retrievals confirm hurricane force winds south of the low center.

Visit ocean.weather.gov for more.

Welcome USNIC!
05/11/2020

Welcome USNIC!

The NOAA component of the U.S. National Ice Center (USNIC) is now part of the National Weather Service! USNIC is a multi-agency center now comprised of elements from the United States Navy’s Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, the United States Coast Guard’s Office of Waterways and Ocean Policy and NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center.

USNIC uses a wide array of satellite and remote sensing technology in order to identify snow and ice cover around the world. This transition brings the organization in line with its future goals, which includes a greater focus on prediction capabilities in addition to ice monitoring and analysis. Read more about the dynamic mission of the USNIC and how experts track shifting ice year-round.

Read more at weather.gov/news/usnic

[Sat, May 9] The time to prepare for a hurricane is NOW, before the season begins. Once you’re under pressure, having a ...
05/09/2020

[Sat, May 9] The time to prepare for a hurricane is NOW, before the season begins. Once you’re under pressure, having a written plan will take the guesswork out of what you need to do to protect you and your family.

Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a Hurricane Watch is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line.

Being prepared now will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.
ready.gov/make-a-plan

Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before...
05/08/2020

Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.
Learn about all the different actions your community can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes: ready.gov/neighbors

"Last month, USNIC confirmed the calving of the world's largest iceberg A-68A. Check out this article by NOAA Satellite ...
05/08/2020
U.S. National Ice Center

"Last month, USNIC confirmed the calving of the world's largest iceberg A-68A. Check out this article by NOAA Satellite and Information Service to learn more about it!" - U.S. National Ice Center (https://www.facebook.com/usnatice/)

Last month, USNIC confirmed the calving of the world's largest iceberg A-68A. Check out this article by NOAA Satellite and Information Service to learn more about it!

If you plan to ride out a hurricane in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code...
05/07/2020

If you plan to ride out a hurricane in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand high winds.
fema.gov/what-mitigation #HurricaneStrong #HurricanePrep

This Hurricane Preparedness Week, call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance checkup to make sure you...
05/06/2020

This Hurricane Preparedness Week, call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance checkup to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. ...and remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for flooding. floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.

Take some time this week - Hurricane Preparedness Week - to make sure you have a hurricane evacuation plan. The first th...
05/04/2020

Take some time this week - Hurricane Preparedness Week - to make sure you have a hurricane evacuation plan. The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you’d go and how you’d get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone or unsafe home, and coordinate with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about.
As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.
hurricanes.gov/prepare

The threats from hurricanes to you and your family can vary widely depending on where you live. It’s not just those alon...
05/03/2020

The threats from hurricanes to you and your family can vary widely depending on where you live. It’s not just those along the coast that can experience significant, life-threatening impacts. Evaluate what you need to do to protect your home and family NOW, before the first storm of the season even forms.
hurricanes.gov/prepare

It only takes one storm to change your life and community. Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destru...
05/02/2020

It only takes one storm to change your life and community. Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Learn how during Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 3-9, 2020). hurricanes.gov/prepare

OPC is pleased to welcome our new director, A.J. Reiss, who came on board this week. Reiss is a retired Navy Captain who...
04/29/2020

OPC is pleased to welcome our new director, A.J. Reiss, who came on board this week. Reiss is a retired Navy Captain who served most of his career as a Meteorology and Oceanography officer including command of a maritime forecast center after early shipboard assignments. He most recently held the position of Division Director of the Ocean Sensing & Systems Application Division at the Office of Naval Research. Prior to that, he served as the Naval Deputy to NOAA for the Oceanographer of the Navy in Washington D.C. and served as a key advisor to both NOAA and the Navy. Read more about him here and join us in welcoming him to OPC! https://www.weather.gov/news/arthur-john

04/13/2020

Fresh to strong winds across OPC's Pacific offshore zones tonight, will weaken Friday night into Saturday, becoming generally light to gentle by Saturday night, as seen in the animation below. #marinewx

04/01/2020

[Apr 1] Intensifying low pressure off the Mid-Atlantic coast producing #hurricane force winds, seas nearing 30 ft #MarineWx Latest N Atlantic analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

[March 25] Active weather continues across the W Atlantic today with a storm force low SE of Newfoundland, and an intens...
03/25/2020

[March 25] Active weather continues across the W Atlantic today with a storm force low SE of Newfoundland, and an intensifying, developing storm force low off the Mid-Atlantic coast. #MarineWx

03/08/2020

Mar 7 sunrise to sunset animation highlighting the mature, warm seclusion phase of the #hurricane force low across the NW Atlantic, via CIMSS natural color RGB imagery. Significant wave heights have continued to build through the day, at last analysis up to 50 ft #MarineWx

Latest analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

03/07/2020

[Mar 6] Incredible pressure falls continue offshore with a rapidly intensifying low off the Mid-Atlantic coast, with deepening rates likely exceeding 20 mb in just the past 6 hours. Dangerous marine conditions remain forecast across OPC marine zones, including #hurricane force winds with significant wave heights building into the 35-45 ft range later tonight and into early Sat. #MarineWx

For the latest analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

Conditions across the W Atlantic will quickly deteriorate Fri and Fri night as low pressure rapidly intensifies offshore...
03/06/2020

Conditions across the W Atlantic will quickly deteriorate Fri and Fri night as low pressure rapidly intensifies offshore and across OPC marine zones (inset). Very hazardous marine conditions are expected to develop including widespread #gale, #storm, and #hurricane force winds with seas building to near 40 ft. #MarineWx

Latest analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

03/01/2020

[Feb 29] Sunrise to sunset visible animation of a compact, but intense gale-force low across the eastern Pacific. This 1021 mb low is forecast to weaken overnight, and dissipate by Sun evening #MarineWx

For the latest Pacific analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Pac_tab.php

02/24/2020

The United States Coast Guard and the National Weather Service are conducting a joint survey of the maritime public in order gain a better understanding of the current use of Marine Weather Information, and to determine the level of interest in potential future products and dissemination methods.

The maritime public is invited to participate in the survey, which can be accessed using the following link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R96SFPF

02/20/2020

[Feb 20] A low pressure will form just off the SE coast today, then intensify while tracking east across OPC offshore marine zones. Widespread #gale (light pink) and #storm (purple) warnings continue. While OPC forecasts significant wave heights to increase into the 20-25 ft range, the sea state in the Gulf Stream in these strong N to NE counter-flow regimes can be especially hazardous with higher frequency, steeper, breaking waves likely. #MarineWx

Atlantic analysis and forecast info: https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

Another low pressure has rapidly intensified south of Iceland (958 mb at 12z), marking the 33rd #hurricaneforce wind eve...
02/19/2020

Another low pressure has rapidly intensified south of Iceland (958 mb at 12z), marking the 33rd #hurricaneforce wind event of the North Atlantic OPC cold season (6/1/2019 - 5/31/2020). The last image shows this current year progress (red) compared to the previous 14 seasons. #MarineWx

Dr. Michael Folmer, one the OPC's Marine Forecasters, has written a blog post summarizing the most recent hurricane forc...
02/16/2020
North Atlantic Storminess – February 13-15, 2020

Dr. Michael Folmer, one the OPC's Marine Forecasters, has written a blog post summarizing the most recent hurricane force low pressure system in the eastern Atlantic. It can be found at the following link:

https://satelliteliaisonblog.com/2020/02/16/north-atlantic-storminess-february-13-15-2020/

It includes satellite loops along with Ascat and altimeter data of this system.

A rapidly intensifying low pressure system made its way into the Atlantic on Tuesday, 11 February 2020 and quickly grew into a powerful extratropical cyclone producing hurricane force winds by Thur…

02/14/2020

GOES-16 RGB Airmass imagery from 12z yesterday to 21z today show the evolution of yesterday's picturesque #HurricaneForce low, and the development of the next rapidly intensifying low that is forecast to deepen to 914 mb by 18z tomorrow. #Marinewx

The next headlining storm to bring #HurricaneForce conditions to the Atlantic will be a low currently SE of Nova Scotia ...
02/13/2020

The next headlining storm to bring #HurricaneForce conditions to the Atlantic will be a low currently SE of Nova Scotia moving NE ~60 kt. Noted in the image below are low center positions and times from the GFS 18z run. #marinewx

02/13/2020

The Atlantic and Pacific both have large storms that are producing winds in excess of 50 kt, and significant sea heights greater than 40 ft! In particular, the system in the Atlantic is producing 90 kt winds, and significant seas up to 54 ft (as of 12z).

[Feb 12-13] explosive cyclogenesis across the western and central Atlantic, as seen via GOES-E RGB air mass imagery -- t...
02/13/2020

[Feb 12-13] explosive cyclogenesis across the western and central Atlantic, as seen via GOES-E RGB air mass imagery -- the low continues to produce hazardous marine conditions including #hurricane force winds to 80 kt, seas well in excess of 40 ft. #MarineWx

[Feb 12] Rapidly intensifying low pressure clipping southern Newfoundland, forecast to deepen 46 mb over the next 24 hou...
02/12/2020

[Feb 12] Rapidly intensifying low pressure clipping southern Newfoundland, forecast to deepen 46 mb over the next 24 hours into the central Atlantic. Marine hazards next 24 hours include hurricane-force winds to 80 kt, significant wave heights increasing to near 50 ft. Latest OPC surface analysis and high seas text forecast included. #MarineWx

https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php

02/12/2020

5-day animation of GFS model winds across the North Atlantic, highlighting a very active low track with a series of rapidly intensifying, hurricane-force systems. Several lows will likely deepen well below 940 mb. The wind speed legend is at the top left, but the yellows are #gales, dark browns #storm force, and the bright reds correlate to #hurricane force winds.

Keep close tabs to https://ocean.weather.gov/Atl_tab.php for the latest analysis and forecast information!

U.S. National Weather Service (NWS)
02/09/2020

U.S. National Weather Service (NWS)

Today marks the 150th Birthday of the National Weather Service! Few Federal agencies have been in existence as long, and even fewer have had thousands of employees dedicated to one enduring, timeless mission. Our agency was built on vision and dedication of those who came before us -- but as we look back, we also look forward. Just as our heritage provides the context for where we are today, it also provides inspiration for sustaining the NWS well into the future. To learn more about our heritage, visit weather.gov/heritage #NWS150

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Fans should not rely on this service as the primary means of receiving alerts/warnings of hazardous weather. NWS alerts/warnings are available on NOAA Weather Radio and our official website: http://weather.gov/ and https://weather.ocean.gov/ Responses to fan posts are made on a time-available basis and may be extremely limited during periods of hazardous weather. NWS Posting Policy: The National Weather Service (NWS) is using Facebook as a supplemental channel for improving weather awareness. Postings to this page highlight activities of interest and importance to both the weather community and the public, and include NWS meetings, constituent and partner engagement activities, and public education efforts. Questions or comments about local forecasts or local advisories/watches/warnings need to be submitted to the issuing local Weather Forecast Offices. The local Weather Forecast Offices are listed at: http://www.weather.gov/organization.php There is no endorsement, implied or otherwise, by the NWS of any fan posts, links, or photos. Writers/fans are fully responsible for the content they submit. Your comments are important to us and others who read these pages. It's important to remember that our weather community includes people of all ages and backgrounds. What seems funny to one person might be truly offensive to another. From our experience, the people who join in the dialog on these pages mostly self-moderate each other. The NWS posting policy is intended to set clear guidelines on what is appropriate for these pages. Above all, posted comments must be appropriate for all ages and be courteous and respectful of others and related to matters, activities, programs, policies or operations relevant to the NWS. NWS has established the following posting policies and reserves the right to delete postings that are inconsistent with them. Therefore, it is our policy to remove comments that: * are from anyone younger than 13 years of age; * contain defamatory, vulgar, obscene, abusive, profane, threatening, hateful, intimidating, or otherwise offensive language; * contain malicious or offensive comments based on gender, race, class, ethnicity, national origin, political affiliation, religion, sexual orientation, disability, or other classification; * contain advertisements, endorsements, or promotions, including spam and similar content; * contain comments on matters unrelated to activities of the National Weather Service or its programs, policies, operations, or general areas of responsibility; * contain impersonations or misrepresents the writer’s identity or affiliation; * contain viruses or similar harmful programs; * contain proprietary information or intellectual property that is posted without the approval of the owner; * recommend that members of the public contact a member of Congress or of a state or local legislature; * contain comments regarding a candidate in a partisan political campaign or regarding a political party; or * contain information that violates a local, state, or national law. For more about NWS use of FaceBook and other social networking services, see the page at: http://www.weather.gov/socialmedia

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