El Paso County Conservation District

El Paso County Conservation District The function of EPCCD is to coordinate technical,financial,educational resources to meet the needs of the local land user to conserve natural resources
(2)

OURGOALS Implement farm conservation practices to minimize water use, improve yield and conserve soil. Help developers and homeowners manage the land in an environmentally sensitive manner. Reach out to communities and schools to teach the value of natural resources and encourage conservation. Promote planting trees and other land cover to hold soil in place, clean the air, provide cover for wildlife and beautify neighborhoods. Conserve and restore wetlands to purify water and provide habitat for birds, fish and other animals. Protect groundwater resources. OUR HISTORY In the early 1930s the United States experienced an unparalleled ecological disaster known as the Dust Bowl. Severe, sustained drought in the Great Plains caused soil erosion and huge black dust storms that blotted out the sun. The storms stretched south to Texas and east to New York. Dust even sifted into the White House and onto the desk of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. After seeing the sky black with dust in Washington, the U.S. Congress unanimously passed legislation declaring soil and water conservation a national policy and priority. Since about three-fourths of the United States was privately owned, Congress realized that only active, voluntary support from landowners would guarantee the success of conservation work on private land. In 1937, President Roosevelt wrote the governors of all the states recommending legislation that would allow local landowners to form soil conservation districts. Conserving natural resources for our future HOW WE WORK All board members of a Conservation District are volunteers and land owners within that district. The board meets once per month to set strategies and goals for the district. The programs and projects selected for implementation in the district are determined based on inputs from local land owners. Each Conservation District has an assigned liaison from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to ensure that all selected programs and projects are well coordinated with the NRCS. We also partner with Colorado State University Extension and county agencies. Each district may also have one or more paid employees to handle administrative requirements and support the programs selected by the districts' Boards of Directors. The majority of Conservation District funding comes from local fund raising projects. The State of Colorado Department of Agriculture also provides some amount of direct assistance as state budgets allow. WHY WE WANT YOU TO GET INVOLVED People are the key to conservation district success. Local people offer extensive expertise and interest regarding the best ways to take care of their own natural resources. Effective management of natural resources at the local level reduces outside intervention and regulation. Districts often have minimal budgets, and can't meet their conservation goals without volunteer help. Volunteers in education can help youth learn to be responsible stewards of the land. HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED We are always looking for people that would like to serve as board members, volunteers and communicators of local conservation needs. If you are interested please contact your local Conservation District.

Operating as usual

Did somebody say FRIDAY!!!
02/12/2021

Did somebody say FRIDAY!!!

Kasai's got that #FridayFeeling.

How do birds keep warm in the winter?
02/11/2021
How do birds keep warm in the winter?

How do birds keep warm in the winter?

Have you ever wondered how birds stay warm when temperatures plunge? Birds of all shapes and sizes have special adaptations for living in cold climates. Learn more about tough birds and their tips for staying warm.

Bear Creek Nature Center & Fountain Creek Nature Center
02/11/2021

Bear Creek Nature Center & Fountain Creek Nature Center

JOB OPPORTUNITY: Part Time Park Interpreter/Caretaker at Paint Mines Interpretive Park

Please visit the link below to find the full job description, and please share this post to help us get the word out!

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/ElPasoCountyCo?page=2

National Drought Mitigation Center
02/11/2021

National Drought Mitigation Center

U.S. #Drought Monitor 2-11-21: Drought covers 38.4% of the U.S. and Puerto Rico, similar to last week. Storms in the Northeast, Pacific Northwest, northern Rockies and upper Midwest led to pockets of improved drought conditions in those regions.

This week’s USDM change map shows pockets of moderate drought (D1) developing in Ark., La., Miss. and Tenn., where precipitation has ranged from one-third to half of normal in several locations from Jan. 1-Feb. 9. Warmth and dry weather led to growing coverage of moderate to extreme (D3) drought in parts of Texas.

Keep track of #Drought2021 with the U.S. Drought Monitor and its data, mapping and narrative resources at droughtmonitor.unl.edu.

Soil Learning Center
02/11/2021

Soil Learning Center

Poor Soil Condition vs Good Soil Condition👇

Soil Learning Center
02/11/2021

Soil Learning Center

Happy Monday Soil Lovers!👨‍🌾👩‍🌾
Hope you are all having a fantastic day🌻

Here's our Word of the Day🌱👇

All-hands on deck for fire mitigation efforts in Durango, Colorado - The Municipal
02/10/2021
All-hands on deck for fire mitigation efforts in Durango, Colorado - The Municipal

All-hands on deck for fire mitigation efforts in Durango, Colorado - The Municipal

In 2018, southwest Colorado experienced one of the largest wildfires in the state’s history. The wildfire started in June and continued through July, burning across an estimated 54,000 acres. Prompted by this wildfire, multiple entities near the Durango area … Continue reading →

did you say MONDAY?????????
02/08/2021

did you say MONDAY?????????

Ready... Set... STARING CONTEST!

We're pretty sure ring-tailed lemur, Rogue, has got you beat. #SillySunday

02/08/2021
National Audubon Society

Yawn......Happy Monday 🙂

We think all owls are superb but do you have a favorite #SuperbOwl?

Soil Learning Center
02/07/2021

Soil Learning Center

🌱What are Soil Nutrients🌱

It's not too soon to start thinking trees and shrubs!!! Go to our website at www.epccd.org and check out our trees. SIMP...
02/04/2021
Your Site Title

It's not too soon to start thinking trees and shrubs!!! Go to our website at www.epccd.org and check out our trees. SIMPLE process..
1. pick out discount trees on our tree list on webpage 2. call us for pick up location and time. 3. Pay us at location then drive one block up the road and Harding nursery will do the rest!!! We partner with Harding nursery to provide trees at a discount!!!🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲

Conservation Starts with you

National Drought Mitigation Center
02/04/2021

National Drought Mitigation Center

U.S. #Drought Monitor 2-4-21: Drought covers about 38.3% of the U.S. and Puerto Rico, similar to last week. However, a storm that lingered over California before turning eastward helped ease extreme (D3) and severe (D2) drought conditions there.

This week’s USDM change map shows where California’s most powerful storm of the season to date delivered drought-easing precipitation. The storm also caused local flooding and landslides before moving eastward. Dry weather prevailed in the South and Southeast.

Read a full summary of the latest drought monitoring period at droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Summary.aspx.

And keep track of #Drought2021 with the U.S. Drought Monitor and all of its resources at droughtmonitor.unl.edu.

Garden The Plains
02/04/2021

Garden The Plains

Teach a Child to Garden

If for some reason you were not able to teach your child how to start gardening in 2020's pandemic, then maybe in 2021 growing season you can. Here are some very simple ways to engage your child:

• Ask if they are interested in learning about gardening.
• Share with them every step in the process.
• Start at the beginning of looking through catalogues and selecting seeds.
• Show them how to grow squash, watermelon, and cantaloupe in a container.
• Provide a calendar that is separate for gardening tasks.
• Mark dates on the calendar for starting certain seeds, frost free dates and so on.

Above all, give them responsibility. Naturally, the responsibility you assign each child will differ with their age. Responsibility to do certain small tasks you know they can handle such as watering the newly planted squash seeds and marking the calendar when they have watered them. That way everyone knows.

Make clear and simple explanations for why you are doing certain tasks when you are doing them. Children are inquisitive and imaginative. Encourage these qualities by helping them explore. What happens when you do not plant the onion bulb in deep enough or with the basil end facing the soil surface. Let them plant one onion bulb incorrectly and use a stake to mark it. Watching and wondering what will happen is half the fun. When the onion sprouts along with the others is when you explain geotropism to them.

Giving them the opportunity to explore and encourage their curiosity which can engage them further with gardening. By doing these things you are giving your children a hand in every aspect of the family garden. When I was only eight years old, my grandmother told me about the importance of working in fertilizer and sometimes coffee grounds around her roses. She showed me how and then gave me the responsibility to get it done. Your child may not grow up have a career in horticulture like I have had, but they may have gardening as a hobby for the rest of their life. When times get tough, they know how to grow their own food.

For more information to help assist you in this endeavor, here is a link to a CSU article by a CSU Master Garden in Larimer titled “Growing Food and Growing Gardeners” : https://extension.colostate.edu/topic-areas/yard-garden/growing-food-and-growing-gardeners/

At the bottom of the article posted above are CSU Fact Sheets to help you with growing vegetables. In 2021 growing season, Grow and Give will continue. Consider taking part if you did not in 2020. For more information go to the following link: https://cmg.extension.colostate.edu/grow-give/
Also, get in contact with your local Extension Office or Master Gardeners in your area.

If you need more assistance with gardening activities here is a short list of links for different age levels:

https://kidsgardening.org/garden-activities/
https://garden.org/

Photo credit: Linda Langelo, Sherry Brandt with Kylie and Carlie

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
02/04/2021

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES!

We’re collaborating with Hispanic Access Foundation to offer unique and meaningful work experiences supporting wildlife conservation.

Apply now: http://ow.ly/3l1m50DqHyh

Application deadlines:

USFWS Directorate Fellowship Program Office of Law Enforcement positions: February 5

USFWS summer internship positions: February 8

Restoring the plant’s soil microbiome
02/02/2021
Restoring the plant’s soil microbiome

Restoring the plant’s soil microbiome

Preface: The below content is a cursory overview of numerous plant and soil microbiological processes. This overview is intended as an introduction to these processes. So rather than a detailed dis…

Colorado Department of Agriculture
02/02/2021

Colorado Department of Agriculture

According to Colorado Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, fruit & veggie production is a nearly $300 million dollar industry in Colorado, with more than 60,000 growing acres primarily in Fremont, Mesa, Durango, and Delta Counties.

LEARN MORE & RECIPE
https://ag.colorado.gov/press-release/fall-in-love-with-colorado-apples

U.S. Department of the Interior
02/02/2021

U.S. Department of the Interior

"A sandhill sunrise." Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge is part of the San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Colorado. The surrounding mountains feed the arid valley with surface water which provides crucial feeding, resting, and breeding habitat for over 200 bird species and other wildlife, including these sandhill cranes. Photo by Peter Ismert (ShareTheExperience.org).

Collaboration is Key to Scaling Regenerative Agriculture
02/02/2021
Collaboration is Key to Scaling Regenerative Agriculture

Collaboration is Key to Scaling Regenerative Agriculture

Gaining greater stability in the face of crisis is just one reason brands like the natural and organic meat label Applegate are embracing regenerative agriculture.

U.S. Forest Service
02/02/2021

U.S. Forest Service

This month we take time to celebrate Black History Month. It’s a time to reflect and celebrate the remarkable achievements of African Americans and their contributions to our great nation and agency.

Happy Tuesday😁
02/02/2021

Happy Tuesday😁

EMU

When will the barbershops open?
Emu by Remco Walravens
facebook.com/rrwanimalphotography/

Soil Learning Center
01/30/2021

Soil Learning Center

𝐐𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐚𝐲!👨‍🌾🌱🌳🌾💚

USDA offers temporary debt relief to 12,000 farmers
01/30/2021
USDA offers temporary debt relief to 12,000 farmers

USDA offers temporary debt relief to 12,000 farmers

USDA will temporarily suspend some debt collections and foreclosures as part of the Biden administration's plan to help financially distressed farms during the pandemic.

U.S. Forest Service
01/30/2021

U.S. Forest Service

Research finds that location and neighborhood matter for coho salmon. From their roots in rivers and streams to the mighty Pacific ocean, these habitats need a connection now more than ever. To survive, coho salmon need a connected habitat network that meets the needs of each life stage. They need different seasonal habitats for adult spawning, rearing juveniles in the summer and sheltering juveniles over the winter. https://www.fs.usda.gov/features/coho-salmon-thrive-more-established-neighborhoods

National Drought Mitigation Center
01/28/2021

National Drought Mitigation Center

U.S. #Drought Monitor 1-28-21: Drought coverage across the U.S. and Puerto Rico increased by almost a percentage point, to ~38.5% of the area. Exceptional drought (D4), which covered 8.26% of the U.S. through most of December, eased in central Arizona, and has decreased to ~7.5%.

The USDM change map shows improvements related to persistent, above-normal precipitation across the southern tier of the West and the southern Oregon coast. A dry week across much of Montana, Wyoming and the western Dakotas contributed to expanded/intensified dryness and drought.

Keep track of the #Drought2021 with the U.S. Drought Monitor at droughtmonitor.unl.edu.

01/28/2021
U.S. Department of the Interior
01/27/2021

U.S. Department of the Interior

Truly a golden hour.
Light illuminates the winter woods and makes for an enchanting entrance into Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge in Illinois. With over 5 miles of hiking trails and 10 miles of gravel biking paths, observation decks, and boat and canoe access, Chautauqua offers many excellent chances to watch wildlife and enjoy the roads, less-traveled. Photo of deer crossing the entrance road by Emily Hodapp, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Greener Pastures Ranching
01/26/2021

Greener Pastures Ranching

We Fix Cycles.

Matter can not be created or destroyed. Everything has a cycle. It is just that we have disrupted the cycles.

It's true, we have far too much carbon in the atmosphere. We have also lost huge amounts of carbon from our soils. This is not a complex issue. We just need to fix the cycle by removing the excess carbon from the air and storing it back in the soil. The term is called carbon sequestration and we need plants and animals to do it.

The carbon in the plants leaves comes from the air around them via the process of photosynthesis. The carbon in the roots of plants also comes from the air as it get transported from the leaves to grow roots. Even the carbon in the exudate that the plant sends out the root tips and gives to the soil microbes, comes from the air.

The key to regenerative agriculture comes from the plants with their symbiotic relationships with the soil organisms. With proper management, we can take so much more of this atmospheric carbon and store it in the soil. The plants add carbon to the soil. Modern agriculture mines the soil and releases C into the air. It also exports the nutrients when the crop is removed. We need to manage the plants regeneratively so the plants can sequester the carbon, we need to stop exporting it and store it in the ground. Thats where livestock come in. They recycle.
Modern agriculture grows plants from the soil. With regenerative agriculture, we use the plants to grow the soil. Big difference.

We also have a broken water cycle. Again it is a cycle. Matter can not be created or destroyed. We do not have water shortages, we have water mismanagement which is causing severe flooding and extreme droughts. To fix this.... we need to add carbon to the soil. Seems like we have the same solution to a couple of our major environmental issues right at our fingertips.

Regenerative Agriculture... we fix cycles.

Steve Kenyon
Greener Pastures Ranching.

Interesting fact about this plant
01/26/2021

Interesting fact about this plant

Southern California has many endemic plants, which means they’re found nowhere else in the world! One such group is known as the carbonate plants. They are found in the carbonate belt, an area of the San Bernardino Mountains, which contains unique soils in a series of bands that run east to west along the desert-facing slopes of the mountains. Fun fact, calcium carbonate is used as an ingredient in toothpaste! We work with the U.S. Forest Service and other landowners to conserve these amazing plants.

Photos by the U.S. Forest Service

Golden Plains Area Extension
01/24/2021

Golden Plains Area Extension

Soil Learning Center
01/22/2021

Soil Learning Center

‘Soil Health’ is a term that is being discussed more and more by farmers, growers, agronomists and researchers but what does it really mean?

Check out this article to read more! 🌱

👉 https://bit.ly/363tGoH

National Drought Mitigation Center
01/21/2021

National Drought Mitigation Center

U.S. #Drought Monitor 1-21-21: Most of the country had a relatively dry week, with the significant exception of the Pacific Northwest and parts of Idaho and Montana in the Intermountain West. Drought covers 37.6% of the area across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

This week’s USDM change map shows the introduction of abnormal dryness (D0, not yet drought) across several states in the South, where little or no precipitation fell region-wide. Across the U.S. and Puerto Rico, drought now affects almost 67.4 million people.

Keep track of #Drought2021 with the U.S. Drought Monitor and its resources at droughtmonitor.unl.edu.

Address

5610 Industrial Pl Suite 100
Colorado Springs, CO
80916

Telephone

(719) 686-4510

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OURGOALS Implement farm conservation practices to minimize water use, improve yield and conserve soil. Help developers and homeowners manage the land in an environmentally sensitive manner. Reach out to communities and schools to teach the value of natural resources and encourage conservation. Promote planting trees and other land cover to hold soil in place, clean the air, provide cover for wildlife and beautify neighborhoods. Conserve and restore wetlands to purify water and provide habitat for birds, fish and other animals. Protect groundwater resources. OUR HISTORY In the early 1930s the United States experienced an unparalleled ecological disaster known as the Dust Bowl. Severe, sustained drought in the Great Plains caused soil erosion and huge black dust storms that blotted out the sun. The storms stretched south to Texas and east to New York. Dust even sifted into the White House and onto the desk of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. After seeing the sky black with dust in Washington, the U.S. Congress unanimously passed legislation declaring soil and water conservation a national policy and priority. Since about three-fourths of the United States was privately owned, Congress realized that only active, voluntary support from landowners would guarantee the success of conservation work on private land. In 1937, President Roosevelt wrote the governors of all the states recommending legislation that would allow local landowners to form soil conservation districts. Conserving natural resources for our future HOW WE WORK All board members of a Conservation District are volunteers and land owners within that district. The board meets once per month to set strategies and goals for the district. The programs and projects selected for implementation in the district are determined based on inputs from local land owners. Each Conservation District has an assigned liaison from the Natural Resources Conservation Service to ensure that all selected programs and projects are well coordinated with the NRCS. We also partner with Colorado State University Extension and county agencies. Each district may also have one or more paid employees to handle administrative requirements and support the programs selected by the districts' Boards of Directors. The majority of Conservation District funding comes from local fund raising projects. The State of Colorado Department of Agriculture also provides some amount of direct assistance as state budgets allow. WHY WE WANT YOU TO GET INVOLVED People are the key to conservation district success. Local people offer extensive expertise and interest regarding the best ways to take care of their own natural resources. Effective management of natural resources at the local level reduces outside intervention and regulation. Districts often have minimal budgets, and can't meet their conservation goals without volunteer help. Volunteers in education can help youth learn to be responsible stewards of the land. HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED We are always looking for people that would like to serve as board members, volunteers and communicators of local conservation needs. If you are interested please contact your local Conservation District.

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State Ag and Natural Resources Departments Seek Public Feedback on 2020 Drought Experiences September 10, 2020 (Denver, CO) - Following an exceptionally dry spring and summer, drought conditions now cover 99% of the state of Colorado, exacerbated by record-breaking temperatures and an existing moisture deficit continuing from last fall. On June 22, Governor Polis activated the Colorado Drought Mitigation and Response Plan under the chairmanship of directors from the Departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Local Affairs. The plan includes the implementation of an Agricultural Impact Task Force; and the documentation of first-hand accounts of the drought’s impact on farms, ranches, forests, fields, and rivers. Faced with the challenge of traveling and touring in the midst of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the Colorado Departments of Agriculture and Natural Resources invite all who are experiencing the impacts of drought, particularly in agriculture, to submit their drought-related stories online through a dedicated “Drought Virtual Tour” website managed by the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Anecdotal reports, stories, photos, videos or recommendations from agriculture producers and communities regarding drought conditions, economic challenges, and adaptive solutions are encouraged. All Colorado citizens may participate and the important information gathered will directly inform current and future statewide drought response efforts. The state will include a selection of submissions in a 2020 drought report to provide more personal accounts of how drought affects Coloradans. For more information, please contact [email protected].
Thank you to everyone that has given us gifts this Christmas!!