CarePlus Home Health Services

CarePlus Home Health Services CarePlus isn't like other home health cares because of our dedication to taking care of your loved ones. You don't find this kind of service just anywhere.

07/03/2018
CarePlus Home Health Services

CarePlus Home Health Services

LONG-TERM CARE
Aging in Place: Growing Old at Home

"The stairs are getting so hard to climb.

"Since my wife died, I just open a can of soup for dinner.

"I've lived here 40 years. No other place will seem like home.

These are common issues for older people. You may share the often-heard wish—"I want to stay in my own home!" The good news is that with the right help you might be able to do just that. Staying in your own home as you get older is called "aging in place." This article contains suggestions to help you find the help you need to continue to live independently.

Planning Ahead to Stay in Your Home
Older woman and her caregiver giving her a mealPlanning ahead is hard because you never know how your needs might change. The first step is to think about the kinds of help you might want in the near future. Maybe you live alone, so there is no one living in your home who is available to help you. Maybe you don't need help right now, but you live with a spouse or family member who does. Everyone has a different situation.

One way to begin planning is to look at any illnesses, like diabetes or emphysema, that you or your spouse might have. Talk with your doctor about how these health problems could make it hard for someone to get around or take care of him- or herself in the future. If you're a caregiver for an older adult, learn how you can get them the support they need to stay in their own home.

What Support Can Help Me Stay at Home?
You can get almost any type of help you want in your home—often for a cost. You can get more information on many of the services listed here from your local Area Agency on Aging, local and State offices on aging or social services, tribal organization, or nearby senior center.

Personal care. Is bathing, washing your hair, or dressing getting harder to do? Maybe a relative or friend could help. Or, you could hire a trained aide for a short time each day.

Household chores. Do you need help with chores like housecleaning, yard work, grocery shopping, or laundry? Some grocery stores and drug stores will take your order over the phone and bring the items to your home. There are cleaning and yard services you can hire, or maybe someone you know has a housekeeper or gardener to suggest. Some housekeepers will help with laundry. Some drycleaners will pick up and deliver your clothes.

Meals. Worried that you might not be eating nutritious meals or tired of eating alone? Sometimes you could share cooking with a friend or have a potluck dinner with a group of friends. Find out if meals are served at a nearby senior center or house of worship. Eating out may give you a chance to visit with others. Is it hard for you to get out? Ask someone to bring you a healthy meal a few times a week. Meal delivery programs bring hot meals into your home; some of these programs are free or low-cost.

Money management. Do you worry about paying bills late or not at all? Are health insurance forms confusing? Maybe you can get help with these tasks. Ask a trusted relative to lend a hand. Volunteers, financial counselors, or geriatric care managers can also help. Just make sure you get the referral from a trustworthy source, like your local Area Agency on Aging. If you use a computer, you could pay your bills online. Check with your bank about this option. Some people have regular bills, like utilities and rent or mortgage, paid automatically from their checking account.

Be careful to avoid money scams. Never give your Social Security number, bank or credit card numbers, or other sensitive information to someone on the phone (unless you placed the call) or in response to an email. Always check all bills, including utility bills, for charges you do not recognize.

Even though you might not need it now, think about giving someone you trust permission to discuss your bills with creditors or your Social Security or Medicare benefits with those agencies. Learn more about legal and financial planning for older adults.

Health care. Do you forget to take your medicine? There are devices available to remind you when it is time for your next dose. Special pill boxes allow you or someone else to set out your pills for an entire week. Have you just gotten out of the hospital and still need nursing care at home for a short time? The hospital discharge planner can help you make arrangements, and Medicare might pay for a home health aide to come to your home.

If you can't remember what the doctor told you to do, try to have someone go to your doctor visits with you. Ask them to write down everything you are supposed to do or, if you are by yourself, ask the doctor to put all recommendations in writing.

07/03/2018

LONG-TERM CARE
Aging in Place: Growing Old at Home

"The stairs are getting so hard to climb.

"Since my wife died, I just open a can of soup for dinner.

"I've lived here 40 years. No other place will seem like home.

These are common issues for older people. You may share the often-heard wish—"I want to stay in my own home!" The good news is that with the right help you might be able to do just that. Staying in your own home as you get older is called "aging in place." This article contains suggestions to help you find the help you need to continue to live independently.

Planning Ahead to Stay in Your Home
Older woman and her caregiver giving her a mealPlanning ahead is hard because you never know how your needs might change. The first step is to think about the kinds of help you might want in the near future. Maybe you live alone, so there is no one living in your home who is available to help you. Maybe you don't need help right now, but you live with a spouse or family member who does. Everyone has a different situation.

One way to begin planning is to look at any illnesses, like diabetes or emphysema, that you or your spouse might have. Talk with your doctor about how these health problems could make it hard for someone to get around or take care of him- or herself in the future. If you're a caregiver for an older adult, learn how you can get them the support they need to stay in their own home.

What Support Can Help Me Stay at Home?
You can get almost any type of help you want in your home—often for a cost. You can get more information on many of the services listed here from your local Area Agency on Aging, local and State offices on aging or social services, tribal organization, or nearby senior center.

Personal care. Is bathing, washing your hair, or dressing getting harder to do? Maybe a relative or friend could help. Or, you could hire a trained aide for a short time each day.

Household chores. Do you need help with chores like housecleaning, yard work, grocery shopping, or laundry? Some grocery stores and drug stores will take your order over the phone and bring the items to your home. There are cleaning and yard services you can hire, or maybe someone you know has a housekeeper or gardener to suggest. Some housekeepers will help with laundry. Some drycleaners will pick up and deliver your clothes.

Meals. Worried that you might not be eating nutritious meals or tired of eating alone? Sometimes you could share cooking with a friend or have a potluck dinner with a group of friends. Find out if meals are served at a nearby senior center or house of worship. Eating out may give you a chance to visit with others. Is it hard for you to get out? Ask someone to bring you a healthy meal a few times a week. Meal delivery programs bring hot meals into your home; some of these programs are free or low-cost.

Money management. Do you worry about paying bills late or not at all? Are health insurance forms confusing? Maybe you can get help with these tasks. Ask a trusted relative to lend a hand. Volunteers, financial counselors, or geriatric care managers can also help. Just make sure you get the referral from a trustworthy source, like your local Area Agency on Aging. If you use a computer, you could pay your bills online. Check with your bank about this option. Some people have regular bills, like utilities and rent or mortgage, paid automatically from their checking account.

Be careful to avoid money scams. Never give your Social Security number, bank or credit card numbers, or other sensitive information to someone on the phone (unless you placed the call) or in response to an email. Always check all bills, including utility bills, for charges you do not recognize.

Even though you might not need it now, think about giving someone you trust permission to discuss your bills with creditors or your Social Security or Medicare benefits with those agencies. Learn more about legal and financial planning for older adults.

Health care. Do you forget to take your medicine? There are devices available to remind you when it is time for your next dose. Special pill boxes allow you or someone else to set out your pills for an entire week. Have you just gotten out of the hospital and still need nursing care at home for a short time? The hospital discharge planner can help you make arrangements, and Medicare might pay for a home health aide to come to your home.

If you can't remember what the doctor told you to do, try to have someone go to your doctor visits with you. Ask them to write down everything you are supposed to do or, if you are by yourself, ask the doctor to put all recommendations in writing.

02/19/2018
CarePlus Home Health Services

CarePlus Home Health Services

How do I forgive a narcissistic parent?

My mother was a narcissist all my life. I was never good enough. I was abused both mentally and physically. When I turned sixteen, she held over my head until I turned eighteen that I had to move out when I turned eighteen. Two weeks before my birthday, she reminded me of my moveout date, so I made a frantic look for a place to live. I move out on my birthday. Two months later I ran in to my mother at a store, and she asked me why I moved out. I told her, and her reply was, “I just wanted you to ask me to stay.” I didn’t talk to here for several years, until I got married and wanted my dad to give me away. Things had changed a bit, and we were amicable. Then my dad died two years after my wedding. I was crushed. For some reason, my mom didn’t seem affected by it at all. She just expected us kids to do all the things dad did for her. She was 50 years old! Why should we have to do her bidding? I sure wasn’t going to. After that I stopped calling and doing things for her. We did birthdays and Christmas, and “why don’t you call me!” Was her thing. She’d even play the game of “Did you just call me?” I’d say no.. then she say, “Well you should have!” Guilt trip after guilt trip. Well she got to be 80 and started falling once in awhile. Last Spring, she started falling at least once a month. Us kids started asking her about assisted living, or moving to a retirement home. No way she says. Well her fallings starts getting more often and one day she ends up with 15 stitches in her head. She then agrees to the retirement home. We get her all situated, but all she does is complain about it. Like she did with her house being too much to upkeep. She’s just not happy wherever she’s at. When she moved into the apt, I kept close tabs on her. Going over there at least once a week, and calling everyday. Last month I called and she didn’t pick up. I rushed over there, and sure enough, she had fallen and had been on the floor for 18 hours. We got her to the hospital to have her checked out, and I had to leave so my brother came to take her home. He helped her out of the car and one step out, she slipped and fell and broke her leg. Back to the hospital. She had surgery the next morning. Because of her being on the floor for so long, and the pain of the leg and not wanting to get up because of it, she developed pneumonia, and complications. She died 12 days later. I love my mom, because I love all people, and I don’t wish anyone ill will. My problem is this. I don’t know how to forgive her. It eats me up, more each day. I hate it. I’ve gone to counselor after counselor, looking for help, and I get nothing, but guilt. Maybe you have an answer I haven’t heard of yet. Thanks in advance.

This is what I have done to get over the hurt and guilt.

First, you need to get some space for yourself. Make up your mind that you are just not going to allow yourself to think about it at all. Put a rubber band around your wrist...when you catch yourself thinking about the whole thing...stop. Snap the rubber band. Force yourself to think about something else.

I am willing to bet that if you do this for the next month, when you come back to this whole situation you will discover that it no longer has a massive impact on you. But, even so, still do not let yourself run it over and over in your mind.

Over the coming months you will discover that whole days pass without thinking About it at all....then whole weeks.

Just give yourself a break and space to get away from it.

02/19/2018

How do I forgive a narcissistic parent?

My mother was a narcissist all my life. I was never good enough. I was abused both mentally and physically. When I turned sixteen, she held over my head until I turned eighteen that I had to move out when I turned eighteen. Two weeks before my birthday, she reminded me of my moveout date, so I made a frantic look for a place to live. I move out on my birthday. Two months later I ran in to my mother at a store, and she asked me why I moved out. I told her, and her reply was, “I just wanted you to ask me to stay.” I didn’t talk to here for several years, until I got married and wanted my dad to give me away. Things had changed a bit, and we were amicable. Then my dad died two years after my wedding. I was crushed. For some reason, my mom didn’t seem affected by it at all. She just expected us kids to do all the things dad did for her. She was 50 years old! Why should we have to do her bidding? I sure wasn’t going to. After that I stopped calling and doing things for her. We did birthdays and Christmas, and “why don’t you call me!” Was her thing. She’d even play the game of “Did you just call me?” I’d say no.. then she say, “Well you should have!” Guilt trip after guilt trip. Well she got to be 80 and started falling once in awhile. Last Spring, she started falling at least once a month. Us kids started asking her about assisted living, or moving to a retirement home. No way she says. Well her fallings starts getting more often and one day she ends up with 15 stitches in her head. She then agrees to the retirement home. We get her all situated, but all she does is complain about it. Like she did with her house being too much to upkeep. She’s just not happy wherever she’s at. When she moved into the apt, I kept close tabs on her. Going over there at least once a week, and calling everyday. Last month I called and she didn’t pick up. I rushed over there, and sure enough, she had fallen and had been on the floor for 18 hours. We got her to the hospital to have her checked out, and I had to leave so my brother came to take her home. He helped her out of the car and one step out, she slipped and fell and broke her leg. Back to the hospital. She had surgery the next morning. Because of her being on the floor for so long, and the pain of the leg and not wanting to get up because of it, she developed pneumonia, and complications. She died 12 days later. I love my mom, because I love all people, and I don’t wish anyone ill will. My problem is this. I don’t know how to forgive her. It eats me up, more each day. I hate it. I’ve gone to counselor after counselor, looking for help, and I get nothing, but guilt. Maybe you have an answer I haven’t heard of yet. Thanks in advance.

This is what I have done to get over the hurt and guilt.

First, you need to get some space for yourself. Make up your mind that you are just not going to allow yourself to think about it at all. Put a rubber band around your wrist...when you catch yourself thinking about the whole thing...stop. Snap the rubber band. Force yourself to think about something else.

I am willing to bet that if you do this for the next month, when you come back to this whole situation you will discover that it no longer has a massive impact on you. But, even so, still do not let yourself run it over and over in your mind.

Over the coming months you will discover that whole days pass without thinking About it at all....then whole weeks.

Just give yourself a break and space to get away from it.

01/21/2018

’’Touching Lives through Quality Home Healthcare Delivery.”

01/17/2018

Most people assume that caregivers are just there to help with activities of daily living, which include personal hygiene, cleaning, cooking, and medication reminders. Yes, caregiver do complete tasks such as these as part of their job but they do much more than that. At Virginia Home Care Services for example, before a snow storm we call all of our clients to make sure they ask their caregivers to complete other tasks like picking up their medications, picking up food from the grocery store, and getting things prepared in lieu of a big snow storm which could render them immobile. That is just one example of how Virginia Home Care Services goes above and beyond to help our clients and their familes. Other tasks that our caregivers help with include:

Managing side effects from medications
Reporting problems with housing, vehicles, and other essentials.
Trying to keep other family members and friends informed of what’s happening with individuals care.
Helping to decide whether a treatment is working and things that may be improved.
The Not So Golden Years
FAQHeader For many seniors, from the time of retirement on, it does not feel like their “golden years”. In some situations individuals have a hard time completing everyday tasks such as doing laundry or dishes. Even cooking or walking to the mailbox may feel like an overwhelming and daunting task. Asking for help or the feeling as though they are a burden to their loved ones drives many seniors to keep performing daily tasks on their own, even though it may be detrimental to their health. Feeling like a burden to their children and loved ones is a common accordance for the elderly population. Family members may not want to argue, cause stress, or overwhelm their loved ones by insisting they receive outside help. This is often frustrating for families and can cause an apathetic attitude towards getting the help that a senior may really need. So how can family caregivers help aging relatives overcome the reluctance to ask for help?

Start mentioning the possibility of receiving additional help in advance.
Address the possibilities of falling, serious injury, or household needs.
Stress that asking for help is actually a sign of strength and is not burdensome.
Express that working together with family or a caregiver strengthens communication.
Help your loved ones understand that caregivers help their clients to maintain their independence.
To make this transition a little easier, Virginia Home Care Services can help alleviate concerns about your loved ones being alone and needing help with any activities of daily living. We provide assistance with personal hygiene, dressing, getting to and from doctors appointments, or post-hospitalization care among other daily tasks. In-home care services provide a workable solution to meeting your loved ones needs, while allowing the them and family members to enjoy burden-free relationship.

5 of the Biggest Misconceptions About Home Care
As the owner of a home care agency, I often come across many misconceptions that people have regarding home care services. When looking for the best care for our loved ones we don’t always know where to turn, who to trust, or how to apprehend proper and suitable care. It is through my exposure to the field, cognizance of the corresponding distress I have witnessed in family members, spouses, parents, and children, as well as the responsibility to unveil the truths and fearful preconceived notions that many experience in order to empower you to make the right decisions when it comes to your family’s care. Here are the 5 biggest misconceptions about home care:

1. Medicare and Privet Insurance covers home care services.
Although Medicare covers your loved ones hospital stays (Part A), medical equipment (Part B), and medicine (Part D), they DO NOT cover home care services. In some cases, Medicare covers skilled care services which includes catheterization, wound care, and medications. Unfortunately, if your loved ones need assistance with activities of daily living; personal hygiene, meal preparation, help with cleaning and laundry, and/or errands, Medicare will not cover these services.

2. Home Care is more expensive than moving your loved ones into a facility.
Of course there are costs associated with any in-home personal care service, but these services are much more flexible than those associated with moving into a nursing facility. Due to the adaptability and the value of staying in your own home, home care service costs are measured much lower than facility care.

3. Home Care services are only needed after my parent or loved one has a bad accident.
Most people want to spend as much time as possible feeling independent, especially as they age. A common misconnection is that having a caregiver will cause a person to lose their independence, but in fact a caregiver can not only increase a person’s independence by prolonging and possibly preventing a major accident but also enhance safety and quality of life. Many elderly individuals living on their own are not as alert and vigilant as they once were. Having an aide present will not only significantly decrease the likelihood of accidents, debilitating conditions, and serious injuries, but increase the safety and quality of life through prevention. In certain situations, where a cognitive condition is at hand, a trained personal care aide can remind individuals to take their medications, be conscience of things like stoves being left on, doors being closed and locked, wondering at night, and other ailments of chronic diseases such as Alzheimer’s or any other condition involving the brain to function abnormally. The harsh reality is that most family members do not consider hiring an aide until the situation has gone from suitable to extremely hazardous and/or life-threatening.

4. A home care agency can not provide the same level of care that a nursing facility does.
At Virginia Home Care Services and most other home care agencies we provide more specialized, personal, and involved care than a nursing home would or could offer. At a nursing facility, you might have one nursing assistant responsible for 5 to 10 individuals AT ONE TIME! No one is receiving specialized personal care because it is IMPOSSBILE to look after 5-10 people at the same time and give each person the care they deserve. In-home caregivers will monitor medications and vital signs 24 hours a day, seven days a week. An in-home care aide is only responsible for one patient at a time, which means that he or she is able to focus, pay more attention, and interact with one key individual.

5. Home care services are a replacement for family and friends.
This common misconception could not be more wrong. In fact, when a caregiver is brought into the picture it allows family and friends, be just that, family and friends. A home care aide can help release stress and allow time for a periodic break from taking care of a parent or relative. Care givers can provide respite care, allowing loved ones to find much-needed balance in their lives and not become so overwhelmed with the weight of overexerting yourself mentally, physically, and emotionally.

Key Principles to Remember When Working with People with Disabilities
Virginia Home Care Services specializes in working not only in the elderly community but also with individuals with intellectual disabilities. Working with individuals with disabilities is rewarding, though at times it can be a challenging endeavor. That is why we at Virginia Home Care Services follow five key principals that help our clients and staff. The purpose of this post is to encourage everyone to interact with individuals with disabilities in a way which promotes autonomy and stimulates successful fellowships. At Virginia Home Care Services we believe it is extremely important for people with disabilities to fully experience self-determination, independence, the pursuit of happiness, and to have the opportunity to live a fulfilling life. We advocate for enrichment in order to provide an environment and kinship that promotes individuality. Needless to say, having a satisfying and gratifying life looks different for everyone. We at Virginia Home Care Services believe that a gratifying life includes happiness, safety, meaningful activities, intimate relationships with family and friends, an occupation, financial stability, and contribution to the community. When working with individuals that may have a form of disability, we try to incorporate these comprehensive but key principles in their day to day care.

Principle 1: Listening
Individuals are listened to and their choices are respected.

Principle 2: Community
Relationships with families and friends and involvement in the community are supported and encouraged.

Principle 3: Self-Direction
Individuals have informed choice and control over decisions that affect them.

Principle 4: Talents and Gifts
Individuals have opportunities to use and share their gifts and talents not only with staff and family but with their community as well.

Principle 5: Responsibility
There is shared responsibility for supports and choices, from the individual, caregiver, and family as well. We believe that everyone can and should experience a good life. People who provide support should be focused on promoting fulfilling lives of those individuals with disabilities. We believe that these instrumental values are essential to sustaining a meaningful and happy life.

A home health aide in Virginia helping her patient
Home Health Aide in Virginia: What Makes a Great Caregiver?
What Makes a Home Health Aide in Virginia Great?
A home health aide needs to have a few key attributes to separate them from the pack, most people have a good deal of compassion and empathy for others but it takes much more than this to be a great caregiver! Patience, honesty, the right attitude, respect, and professionalism are a few qualities our home health aides at Virginia Home Care Services posses that make them truly stand out. Even though we only employ individuals that have gone through specific training, which include certified nursing assistants or home health aide training, we also make certain that they have a natural aptitude to be great.

1. Patience
Being patient with a client means enduring difficult situations not only without annoyance and anger, but having the compassion to understand the strain that an elderly or disabled individual can be under. It is very important for caregivers to put the client first, whether dementia is an issue, or someone is set in their ways, home health aides need to be understanding, accommodating, and most of all patient!

2. Honesty
Aside from running criminal background checks on all of our employees, they also go through a rigorous interview process to ensure our clients safety. Honesty means much more to us than just that, it means caregivers handle their responsibilities accurately and can be accountable for their actions. It also means they understand the importance of their jobs and arrange for time off in advance, give proper notice for when they can’t make it to work, and deal with every situation in a honest and professional matter. Honesty means working with integrity and reliability with their company and clients.

3. The Right Attitude
No matter how dire the situation, a home health aide must go into his or her job with the right attitude and demeanor. Sometimes, the only things a client needs is for someone around them to have a positive attitude to brighten up their day. Our staff not only plays the role of a caregiver, but go above and beyond to be a friend and a shoulder to lean on. That is why having a caregiver with the right attitude can make all the difference in a clients life.

4. Respect
Following a care plan, observing a client’s needs and wants, and achieving the highest possible results in their work is what we look for in caregivers. Our staff respect our clients, themselves, and their professions. Being a home health aide is a very tough job. The best caregivers are the ones that show respect to their clients and the other people that surround them. By doing this they gain respect for themselves and everyone around them.

5. Professionalism
Being a professional is what ties all the attributes of being a great home health aide together. Showing up to work on time, treating the client with respect and honesty, showing patience, and possessing a great attitude is what makes a great caregiver. At Virginia Home Care Services, we strive to hire individuals who posses these key attributes. By offering the best care possible for you and your loved ones we set ourselves apart from our competitors.

Address

6269 Leesburg Pike, Ste 360
Falls Church, VA
22044

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(703) 533-3623

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Touching Lives through Quality Home Healthcare Delivery.

CarePlus Home Health Services

We support people who have disability, who are recovering from accident or illness, the elderly, pregnant and new born babies as well as pediatric patients. We also step in to help with respite care when the primary caregiver or family is in need of a break.

Our nurses and support staffs are passionate about making a difference in your life and are trained to deliver the kind of high quality care that really makes difference to the everyday lives of care recipients. Support workers provide the assistance they require while helping them maintain their independence in their own homes or in community.

Through the commitment to service excellence and innovation, CAREPLUS HOME HEALTH SERVICES will provide high quality care and support to the frail aged and people with disability.

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