USFWS Wildlife & Habitat Conservation

USFWS Wildlife & Habitat Conservation Welcome to the USFWS Wildlife & Habitat Conservation page Welcome to USFWS Wildlife & Habitat Conservation! This page represents the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service's Ecological Services Program, which provides national leadership for the conservation of species and the habitats on which they depend, including species protected by the Endangered Species Act, the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, the Coastal Barrier Resources Protection Act, the Clean Water Act, and more.

Some good news for all our followers in the Northeast! More than $1 million from Superfund money will restore the larges...
08/22/2019
Connecticut’s largest saltmarsh to be restored using Superfund money

Some good news for all our followers in the Northeast! More than $1 million from Superfund money will restore the largest remaining saltmarsh in Connecticut.

State and federal officials plan to use more than $1 million from Superfund penalty settlements to restore the largest remaining saltmarsh in Connecticut at the mouth of the Housatonic River in Stratford.

Don't underestimate the importance of urban areas to wildlife! From Atlanta to Portland and in many cities in between, w...
08/07/2019
Endangered Species: Endangered Species Online Bulletin

Don't underestimate the importance of urban areas to wildlife! From Atlanta to Portland and in many cities in between, wildlife is thriving in urban areas thanks to creating and restoring much needed habitat. Learn more:

Endangered Species Bulletin

Want to know how YOU can help pollinators like butterflies, hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles and flies?  Avoid or limit...
06/20/2019
Pollinators Home Page - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Want to know how YOU can help pollinators like butterflies, hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles and flies? Avoid or limit your pesticide use, plant a pollinator garden, or create a nesting site. Happy #PollinatorWeek! https://www.fws.gov/pollinators/

These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar. Yet without them, wildlife would have few...

Thanks to a new settlement agreement following years of pollution, Port Gardner Bay in Washington state is going to be r...
06/05/2019
Settlement is ‘an elegant solution to a 100-year-old problem’ | HeraldNet.com

Thanks to a new settlement agreement following years of pollution, Port Gardner Bay in Washington state is going to be restored. The Blue Heron Slough Restoration Project will restore 338 acres of intertidal estuarine and upland habitats, reconnecting to the Snohomish River watershed and Puget Sound, and preserving open space.

A court agreement requires the Port of Everett and the Navy to make up for past pollution.

To all our friends out exploring the Oregon coast, there are 66 new interpretive signs for you to learn about the animal...
05/30/2019
From lemons to lemonade

To all our friends out exploring the Oregon coast, there are 66 new interpretive signs for you to learn about the animals and plants that make that area so special. It's just one component of several new educational projects that are part of the New Carissa oil spill settlement. Enjoy!

It has been more than 20 years since the 640-foot freighter New Carissa ran aground on the Oregon coast during a major winter storm. At the time — Feb. 4, 1999 — the vessel was carrying nearly 400,000 gallons of fuel oil and diesel on board. After four days in the heavy surf near Coos Bay, the N...

What does an organic farm manager and a waterfowl hunter have in common? Big hint: Find out in this #WetlandsWednesday s...
05/22/2019
Ecological Services

What does an organic farm manager and a waterfowl hunter have in common? Big hint: Find out in this #WetlandsWednesday story! (Photo: Canada geese. Credit: Courtney Celley/USFWS)

Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

It's #WetlandsWednesday! Have you heard about prairie potholes? These freshwater marshes are found in the upper Midweste...
05/08/2019
Watching out for Wetlands

It's #WetlandsWednesday! Have you heard about prairie potholes? These freshwater marshes are found in the upper Midwestern prairies and were formed by retreating glaciers about 10,000 years ago. Often called America’s “duck factory” since around half of the continent’s ducks spend at least part of the year there, they are vital habitat for many species including the northern shoveler, pintail and interior least tern. (Credit: USFWS)

5 types of wetland ecosystems and where to find them

Great news for the people and wildlife in Connecticut!  After two old dams and a water line was removed, migratory fish ...
04/24/2019
Quinnipiac River ready for more fish — and recreation

Great news for the people and wildlife in Connecticut! After two old dams and a water line was removed, migratory fish such as American shad and river herring are able to swim to the upper reaches of the Quinnipiac River for first time in more than 150 years!

For the first time in 150 years, American shad and other fish can travel to the upper reaches of the Quinnipiac River, thanks to the removal of two old dams and a water line over the last three years. The effort to improve access to a river that enters Long Island Sound at New Haven is also expected...

Happy Earth Day! This year's theme is "Protect Our Species" and today is a great opportunity to celebrate the work we al...
04/22/2019
Endangered Species | Home Page

Happy Earth Day! This year's theme is "Protect Our Species" and today is a great opportunity to celebrate the work we all do to protect our nation's species and the habitats they depend on. Be kind to the earth and learn how you can help protect species in your area: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/

Web site of the Ecolocical Services Program, a program within the Fish & Wildlife Service.

Just look at what the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program did last year! More than 49 miles of wa...
04/16/2019
Ecological Services | Natural Resource Damage Assessment

Just look at what the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program did last year! More than 49 miles of waterways and 5,652 acres of habitat were restored for public recreational opportunities and wildlife; along with many more accomplishments:

Web site of the Ecological Services Program, a program of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Good news for sea turtles! The Natural Resource Damage Assessment settlement from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill funded...
04/04/2019
Nature Conservancy acquires 6,200 acres to protect sea turtles

Good news for sea turtles! The Natural Resource Damage Assessment settlement from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill funded $5.4 million towards protecting 6,200 acres of sea turtle habitat in South Padre Island. The Nature Conservancy and many other partners worked together on this conservation effort and it's just in time for turtle nesting season!

SOUTH PADRE ISLAND — As the nesting season for Kemp’s ridley sea turtles approaches, Sea Turtle Inc. volunteers and staff have started gearing up for their annual nesting patrols.

Love the coast? What can protect habitat for wildlife, provide natural storm barriers for mainland communities, and save...
03/25/2019
Nearly 10 Billion Taxpayer Dollars Saved by Bipartisan Coastal Law: New Economic Study

Love the coast? What can protect habitat for wildlife, provide natural storm barriers for mainland communities, and save tax dollars at the same time? The Coastal Barrier Resources Act! A recent Audubon study found that CBRA reduced federal disaster expenditures by $9.5 billion between 1989 and 2013. The study also forecasts that additional savings will range between $11 and $109 billion over the next 50 years. People are free to build within CBRA areas, but taxpayers don't subsidize it. Learn more:

Study comes as Coastal Barrier Resources System undergoes 9-state revision after Hurricane Sandy

For those of you followers who are involved or interested in positions with the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and R...
03/18/2019
Fish and Wildlife Biologist

For those of you followers who are involved or interested in positions with the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration Program, this job in Texas could be for you! (Photo: Biologists sampling for contaminants. Credit USFWS)

This position is part of the Texas Coastal Ecological Services Field Office, located in Houston, Texas. As a Fish and Wildlife Biologist you will be responsible for working on restoration planning, NRDAR and emergency response.

What's the big deal about dam removal? Obsolete dams in streams and rivers can become roadblocks for wildlife and fish t...
02/27/2019
Dam Removal in 2018 -- Another successful year of freeing rivers | American Rivers

What's the big deal about dam removal? Obsolete dams in streams and rivers can become roadblocks for wildlife and fish that need to move through connected waters for survival and reproduction. We are one of many partners working to remove obsolete dams and restore waterways. Our partners at American Rivers estimated that last year, 82 dams were removed and 1,230 river miles were reconnected. That's great progress!

82 dams and more than 1,230 miles of river were restored through dam removal in 2018.

Queen Bess Island in Louisiana is known as the the first successful recolonization of brown pelicans in the state. Today...
02/13/2019
Ecological Services

Queen Bess Island in Louisiana is known as the the first successful recolonization of brown pelicans in the state. Today, funds from the Deepwater Horizon settlement are going towards restoring the island and preventing it from eroding away. Leran more: https://go.usa.gov/xEQv2 (Photo: Brown pelicans on Queen Bess island in Louisiana. Credit: Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries)

Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

We see you #polarvortex2019, but nature is resilient! Did you ever wonder how even the smallest animals stay warm in win...
01/30/2019
How do birds keep warm in the winter? | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Midwest Region

We see you #polarvortex2019, but nature is resilient! Did you ever wonder how even the smallest animals stay warm in winter? (Photo courtesy of Keith Williams/Creative Commons)

Have you ever wondered how birds can stay warm in the cold winter months? Common redpolls are a great example. These energetic foragers weigh less than 15 grams and can survive temperatures that plunge nearly 100 degrees below the freezing point! How do they do it? Birds of all shapes and sizes have...

12/12/2018
Reviving Dihiya

The Cherokee Nation and Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge have partnered to designate specific areas of land for the cultivation and harvesting of river cane, a culturally protected species for the Cherokee Nation, for surrounding tribes to utilize.

(Audio Descriptive Version for the Vision Impaired: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2oCi6ZZk52g&feature=youtu.be ) We follow Roger Cain, the Principle Invest...

09/20/2018
Department of the Interior - Gulf Restoration

You all remember the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but you might not know what type of work we've been doing since then to restore the Gulf Coast for the people and wildlife who live there. Check out this video to learn about the progress being made with our partners.

Department of the Interior's ongoing Gulf restoration following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

Awesome news for conservation! Removing invasive rats from Palmyra Atoll, a National Wildlife Refuge halfway between Haw...
08/01/2018
5,000 percent increase in native trees on rat-free palmyra atoll: New research demonstrates strong positive benefit to native trees following invasive species removal

Awesome news for conservation! Removing invasive rats from Palmyra Atoll, a National Wildlife Refuge halfway between Hawai‘i and American Samoa, resulted in a 5,000 percent increase in native trees. 5000 PERCENT!

New research demonstrates dramatic positive benefits for native trees following rat removal at Palmyra Atoll, a magnificent National Wildlife Refuge and natural research laboratory located about 1000 miles south of Hawaii. For five native tree species, including Pisonia grandis, fewer than 150 seedl...

From a fairly unproductive piece of farmland, to a wetland teeming with more than 2,000 ducks, Slow Farm in the Great La...
05/17/2018
Two people, one goal; Farmer, hunting enthusiast embrace conservation

From a fairly unproductive piece of farmland, to a wetland teeming with more than 2,000 ducks, Slow Farm in the Great Lakes area sets the bar for habitat restoration with private landowners.

With the help of Ducks Unlimited, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other partners, Kim Bayer and Mike Bohling have made their properties more welcoming for ducks, deer and countless other animals. In return, those tracts are supporting their way of life.

Big news in Idaho! The Coeur d’Alene Basin Natural Resource Trustees announced the final Restoration Plan for the Coeur ...
05/12/2018
Ecological Services

Big news in Idaho! The Coeur d’Alene Basin Natural Resource Trustees announced the final Restoration Plan for the Coeur d’Alene Basin: approximately $140 million is available from settlements to recover the natural resources and associated services that were injured or lost from mine waste contamination. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2wC3oLa (Credit : USFWS)

Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The 2010 explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig started the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, releasing mill...
05/11/2018
Ecological Services

The 2010 explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig started the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, releasing millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the the largest natural resource damage assessment ever undertaken, we've been working with our partners in Alabama to restore and conserve habitat and replenish and protect wildlife including sea turtles, marine mammals, birds, and oysters. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2FZPstM

Web site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Address

Falls Church, VA
53711

General information

If you're looking for the official source of information about the USFWS Ecological Services Program, please visit our homepage at http://www.fws.gov/ecological-services/. For more information about the USFWS, head to http://www.fws.gov/. Commenting Policy: We encourage civil and constructive conversation. We never discriminate against any views, but we reserve the right to delete any of the following: --- personal attacks or otherwise violent or hateful comments --- selling or advertising --- promoting illegal activity --- off-topic posts --- personal information such as email addresses, telephone numbers, or mailing addresses If you violate these policies repeatedly, we will remove you from this page.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when USFWS Wildlife & Habitat Conservation posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Shortcuts

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in Falls Church

Show All