Arab American Heritage Council

Arab American Heritage Council Established in 1980, the AAHC is an Arab American non-profit organization dedicated to building a strong and united Arab community and providing immigration services to the Greater Flint community.
(7)

Operating as usual

#ThrowbackThursdayDid you know that the AAHC has been hosting musical performances for over 30 years?Since the 1990s, th...
04/22/2021

#ThrowbackThursday

Did you know that the AAHC has been hosting musical performances for over 30 years?

Since the 1990s, the AAHC has invited noteworthy musical performers and ensembles including the National Arab Orchestra, Waleed Howrani, Simon Shaheen, Anouar Brahem, and Amina Annabi. Arabic music has played a significant role in the preservation of tradition and celebration of identity in Arab American communities. Arab countries each have their own traditional music with a variety of influences, genres, and linguistic dialects. Through its complex and unique rhythms, beats, and melodies, Arab artists have been able to tell stories and capture the beauty of the human experience through this art form. One of our most popular events in recent memory was hosting the National Arab Orchestra at the Flint Institute of Music in 2019 to a sold-out crowd!

Check out the National Arab Orchestra on YouTube by clicking here: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheArabOrchestra

To ensure that we can continue to host musical performances here in Flint, please consider donating to us: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

Yesterday, Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts for his horrendous murder of George Floyd. We are keeping ...
04/21/2021

Yesterday, Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts for his horrendous murder of George Floyd. We are keeping Floyd’s family in our thoughts today, and we do so knowing that no verdict will ever be able to lessen their pain and loss. However, this was simple accountability. Accountability can not overturn centuries of state violence against Black communities. We need justice for that.

In order for justice to be achieved, we need to abolish the systems and institutions that killed George Floyd, Daunte Wright, Adam Toledo, Makiyah Bryant, and too many others. The tragic death of George Floyd has ignited a widespread revolution that seeks to systematically change and abolish oppressive policing and carceral systems that criminalize and murder Black communities. The Arab American Heritage Council remains committed to this movement and actively works to reject, dismantle, and uproot white supremacy and other systems of oppression and violence. In the pursuit of justice and liberation, we will continue to ensure that our advocacy work is rooted in systemic and transformational change. #BlackLivesMatter #GeorgeFloyd

Yesterday, Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts for his horrendous murder of George Floyd. We are keeping Floyd’s family in our thoughts today, and we do so knowing that no verdict will ever be able to lessen their pain and loss. However, this was simple accountability. Accountability can not overturn centuries of state violence against Black communities. We need justice for that.

In order for justice to be achieved, we need to abolish the systems and institutions that killed George Floyd, Daunte Wright, Adam Toledo, Makiyah Bryant, and too many others. The tragic death of George Floyd has ignited a widespread revolution that seeks to systematically change and abolish oppressive policing and carceral systems that criminalize and murder Black communities. The Arab American Heritage Council remains committed to this movement and actively works to reject, dismantle, and uproot white supremacy and other systems of oppression and violence. In the pursuit of justice and liberation, we will continue to ensure that our advocacy work is rooted in systemic and transformational change. #BlackLivesMatter #GeorgeFloyd

04/21/2021

Drop-in COVID-19 vaccinations available today at the Central Church of the Nazarene from 8:30 - 2:55pm. More information below!

Celebrating Arab American Heritage Month at the Arab American National Museum
04/20/2021
Celebrating Arab American Heritage Month at the Arab American National Museum

Celebrating Arab American Heritage Month at the Arab American National Museum

The Arab American community is rich with diversity, entrepreneurship, culture, and art, especially our Arab American community right here in the D. A cultural cornerstone of this community is the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn. This museum is the country’s first and only museum dedicate...

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC...
04/19/2021

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC) Fellow, Majd Abuaita!

Majd served as Fellow from 2017-2018. As a Fellow, Majd helped revolutionize the AAHC’s use of digital marketing. He rebuilt the AAHC website and drastically improved the use of AAHC social media. He also created a Fellow template to stay at the AAHC for future Fellows to follow. Majd was a great event planner and hosted the Arab Film Festival in partnership with the Flint Institute of Arts and planned an Arab American Service Day partnership with the Flint Food Bank. Following his time as Fellow, Majd served as Assistant Program Manager during the summer of 2018. During this time, Majd helped host a very successful Golf Outing and developed the organizational capacity of the AAHC ensuring future success for years to come!

Majd graduated from the University of Michigan-Flint in 2020 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology and a Minor in Chemistry. During his time as an undergraduate student, Majd founded The Octaves, a student a ca****la group dedicated to spreading the arts through song, where he served as President for 3 years. Majd was also heavily involved in community service in the Arab American community and received multiple community service and scholastic achievement awards.

We are grateful for Majd’s service to the AAHC and the Arab American community! #AAHCCelebrates40

To ensure that we can continue providing opportunities to young Arab Americans in our area, donate to us here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC) Fellow, Majd Abuaita!

Majd served as Fellow from 2017-2018. As a Fellow, Majd helped revolutionize the AAHC’s use of digital marketing. He rebuilt the AAHC website and drastically improved the use of AAHC social media. He also created a Fellow template to stay at the AAHC for future Fellows to follow. Majd was a great event planner and hosted the Arab Film Festival in partnership with the Flint Institute of Arts and planned an Arab American Service Day partnership with the Flint Food Bank. Following his time as Fellow, Majd served as Assistant Program Manager during the summer of 2018. During this time, Majd helped host a very successful Golf Outing and developed the organizational capacity of the AAHC ensuring future success for years to come!

Majd graduated from the University of Michigan-Flint in 2020 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Biology and a Minor in Chemistry. During his time as an undergraduate student, Majd founded The Octaves, a student a ca****la group dedicated to spreading the arts through song, where he served as President for 3 years. Majd was also heavily involved in community service in the Arab American community and received multiple community service and scholastic achievement awards.

We are grateful for Majd’s service to the AAHC and the Arab American community! #AAHCCelebrates40

To ensure that we can continue providing opportunities to young Arab Americans in our area, donate to us here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

The Arabic language has three different forms: Classical, Modern Standard, and Dialectal (Colloquial) Arabic.Classical A...
04/16/2021

The Arabic language has three different forms: Classical, Modern Standard, and Dialectal (Colloquial) Arabic.

Classical Arabic is mostly used in writing and literature. It can be found in ancient literary texts and a type of it is found in the Quran. Modern Standard Arabic is what is taught in schools and is used in publications and academic writing. Almost all native speakers can understand this form and usually read it and write it. Dialectal Arabic is known as the informal language that Arabs use to communicate in their daily lives. There are four major dialects each with their own variations: North African (Maghrebi), Levantine/Greater Syria (Shami), Gulf (Khaleeji), and Egyptian (Masri). A speaker’s nationality can often be recognized by the dialect they speak, even being so specific as to indicate which town or village they come from.

As part of our celebration of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we will be starting our #WordOfTheWeek series where we will define, spell, and share pronunciations of Arabic words!

The Arabic language has three different forms: Classical, Modern Standard, and Dialectal (Colloquial) Arabic.

Classical Arabic is mostly used in writing and literature. It can be found in ancient literary texts and a type of it is found in the Quran. Modern Standard Arabic is what is taught in schools and is used in publications and academic writing. Almost all native speakers can understand this form and usually read it and write it. Dialectal Arabic is known as the informal language that Arabs use to communicate in their daily lives. There are four major dialects each with their own variations: North African (Maghrebi), Levantine/Greater Syria (Shami), Gulf (Khaleeji), and Egyptian (Masri). A speaker’s nationality can often be recognized by the dialect they speak, even being so specific as to indicate which town or village they come from.

As part of our celebration of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we will be starting our #WordOfTheWeek series where we will define, spell, and share pronunciations of Arabic words!

#ThrowbackThursday Have you ever attended one of our Film Festivals? In our effort to preserve and celebrate Arab cultur...
04/15/2021

#ThrowbackThursday Have you ever attended one of our Film Festivals?

In our effort to preserve and celebrate Arab culture, history, language, and identity, the AAHC has hosted Arab Film Festivals since the 1980s. The Arab Film Festival is one of our most sought-after community events that partners with major institutions like the Flint Institute of Arts and the Arab American National Museum. This collaborative event aims to showcase films that highlight the diverse narratives and stories of the Arab World, as well as unite the community through the arts and create meaningful dialogue. #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth #AAHCCelebrates40

To ensure that we can continue hosting events like this and growing our arts programing, pleaser considers donating to us here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

ACCESS is offering Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations by appointment only at the ACCESS Clinic, on Friday, April 16 from 8 p.m...
04/15/2021

ACCESS is offering Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations by appointment only at the ACCESS Clinic, on Friday, April 16 from 8 p.m. - 1 a.m to accommodate those who are participating in the month of Ramadan.

Call 313-216-2200 to make an appointment. Find eligibility details and more below.

ELIGIBILITY:
- anyone 16 years of age or older (16- and 17-year-olds must have a parent and/or guardian present)

SCHEDULE:
ACCESS Clinic, 6450 Maple St., Dearborn, MI 48126 (call 313-216-2200 to make an appointment)
-Friday, April 16, 8 p.m. - 1 a.m.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
- Second dose will be administered three weeks after the first visit
- Photo ID required at all vaccinations
- Vaccine is free for all; bring an insurance card if you have insurance

#COVIDVaccination #PfizerVaccination #Michigan ##yallavaccinate

Photos from National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC)'s post
04/14/2021

Photos from National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC)'s post

Ramadan Mubarak to all those observing! Wishing you a peaceful, joyous and, healthy month.كل عام و انتم بخير! رمضان مبار...
04/13/2021

Ramadan Mubarak to all those observing! Wishing you a peaceful, joyous and, healthy month.

كل عام و انتم بخير! رمضان مبارك لجميع!

Ramadan Mubarak to all those observing! Wishing you a peaceful, joyous and, healthy month.

كل عام و انتم بخير! رمضان مبارك لجميع!

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC...
04/12/2021

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC) Fellow and current AAHC employee, Lucine Jarrah!

Lucine served as Fellow from 2018-2019. As a Fellow, Lucine helped lead the organization's advocacy efforts by working with local nonprofits, community leaders, and public officials to increase Arab American civic engagement. During this time, Lucine also led multiple projects including a Film Festival in partnership with the Flint Institute of Arts and an Arab Community Service Day in coordination with Habitat for Humanity of Flint. Following her tenure as a Fellow, Lucine went on to serve in her current role as Marketing and Outreach coordinator. In this role, Lucine has greatly expanded AAHC community-building efforts including leading a Census 2020 outreach campaign to ensure accurate counts of Arab Americans in Flint & Genesee County, as well as executing the largest Voter Rights & Information campaign in AAHC history, which reached over 10,000 people!

Lucine graduated from the University of Michigan-Flint in 2020 with her Bachelor's Degree in Political Science. During her time as an undergraduate student, Lucine worked on a variety of campaigns to advance educational equity and support student advocacy and leadership. She is also the founder of Cinema's Finest, an organization dedicated to youth empowerment through the arts. Lucine is currently pursuing her Master's degree at the University of Michigan School of Social Work.

We are grateful for Lucine’s continued service to the AAHC and the Arab American community! #AAHCCelebrates40

To ensure that we can continue providing opportunities to young Arab Americans in our area, donate to us here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

In honor of #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth, we are highlighting former National Network for Arab American Communities (NNAAC) Fellow and current AAHC employee, Lucine Jarrah!

Lucine served as Fellow from 2018-2019. As a Fellow, Lucine helped lead the organization's advocacy efforts by working with local nonprofits, community leaders, and public officials to increase Arab American civic engagement. During this time, Lucine also led multiple projects including a Film Festival in partnership with the Flint Institute of Arts and an Arab Community Service Day in coordination with Habitat for Humanity of Flint. Following her tenure as a Fellow, Lucine went on to serve in her current role as Marketing and Outreach coordinator. In this role, Lucine has greatly expanded AAHC community-building efforts including leading a Census 2020 outreach campaign to ensure accurate counts of Arab Americans in Flint & Genesee County, as well as executing the largest Voter Rights & Information campaign in AAHC history, which reached over 10,000 people!

Lucine graduated from the University of Michigan-Flint in 2020 with her Bachelor's Degree in Political Science. During her time as an undergraduate student, Lucine worked on a variety of campaigns to advance educational equity and support student advocacy and leadership. She is also the founder of Cinema's Finest, an organization dedicated to youth empowerment through the arts. Lucine is currently pursuing her Master's degree at the University of Michigan School of Social Work.

We are grateful for Lucine’s continued service to the AAHC and the Arab American community! #AAHCCelebrates40

To ensure that we can continue providing opportunities to young Arab Americans in our area, donate to us here: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=VYJ8DCYF3N7NJ&source=url

Did you know that both New York City and Flint, Michigan had neighborhoods called "Little Syria" because there were so m...
04/09/2021

Did you know that both New York City and Flint, Michigan had neighborhoods called "Little Syria" because there were so many Arab immigrants living there? Arabs have immigrated to the United States in 4 distinct waves.
----------------------------------------------------------------
1) The first wave was from 1880-1924. Most of these immigrants were Christian and came from what was known as Greater Syria, which included the present-day countries of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, and Iraq. There were also immigrants from Yemen, Morocco, and Egypt. By 1924, approximately 200,000 Arabs were living in the U.S.
--------------------------------------------------------------
2) The second wave of immigration was from 1925-1965. As a result of anti-immigrant policies that included the establishment of an immigration quota system, there was a big drop in Arab immigrants. However, those that were able to come during this time usually were highly educated and were both Christian and Muslim.
--------------------------------------------------------------
3) The third wave of immigration was from 1966-1990. Following the passage of the Immigration Act and Nationality Act in 1965, immigration from the Arab World began to increase in the early 1970s with an estimated 400,000 Arabs coming to the United States. During this wave of immigration, many Arabs were fleeing conflict and war in their home countries. This wave of immigration bringing so many new Arabs to the US in addition to the sizable existing Arab American communities led to the creation of many Arab American organizations across the country. During this period, the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC), the Arab American Institute (AAI), Arab American Institute (AAI), and the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS) were all established. Also, the AAHC was established during this wave.
-------------------------------------------------------------
4) The fourth period of immigration extends from the 1990s to the present day. Political push factors increased and diversified Arab immigration. The number of Iraqis, Somalis, and Sudanese in the U.S. grew from relatively small numbers to many thousands as people escaped continued conflict. Economic challenges such as unemployment and sweeping social changes were reasons for Egyptians, Moroccans, and Jordanians to immigrate following the Arab Spring revolutions that began in 2010. Currently, we see large numbers of Syrians and Yemenis immigrating due to civil war.

Special thanks to the Arab American National Museum for their continued efforts in documenting, preserving, and presenting the culture and contributions of Arab Americans. #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth #AAHCCelebrates4

Photo credit: Arab American Stories

Did you know that both New York City and Flint, Michigan had neighborhoods called "Little Syria" because there were so many Arab immigrants living there? Arabs have immigrated to the United States in 4 distinct waves.
----------------------------------------------------------------
1) The first wave was from 1880-1924. Most of these immigrants were Christian and came from what was known as Greater Syria, which included the present-day countries of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, and Iraq. There were also immigrants from Yemen, Morocco, and Egypt. By 1924, approximately 200,000 Arabs were living in the U.S.
--------------------------------------------------------------
2) The second wave of immigration was from 1925-1965. As a result of anti-immigrant policies that included the establishment of an immigration quota system, there was a big drop in Arab immigrants. However, those that were able to come during this time usually were highly educated and were both Christian and Muslim.
--------------------------------------------------------------
3) The third wave of immigration was from 1966-1990. Following the passage of the Immigration Act and Nationality Act in 1965, immigration from the Arab World began to increase in the early 1970s with an estimated 400,000 Arabs coming to the United States. During this wave of immigration, many Arabs were fleeing conflict and war in their home countries. This wave of immigration bringing so many new Arabs to the US in addition to the sizable existing Arab American communities led to the creation of many Arab American organizations across the country. During this period, the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC), the Arab American Institute (AAI), Arab American Institute (AAI), and the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS) were all established. Also, the AAHC was established during this wave.
-------------------------------------------------------------
4) The fourth period of immigration extends from the 1990s to the present day. Political push factors increased and diversified Arab immigration. The number of Iraqis, Somalis, and Sudanese in the U.S. grew from relatively small numbers to many thousands as people escaped continued conflict. Economic challenges such as unemployment and sweeping social changes were reasons for Egyptians, Moroccans, and Jordanians to immigrate following the Arab Spring revolutions that began in 2010. Currently, we see large numbers of Syrians and Yemenis immigrating due to civil war.

Special thanks to the Arab American National Museum for their continued efforts in documenting, preserving, and presenting the culture and contributions of Arab Americans. #ArabAmericanHeritageMonth #AAHCCelebrates4

Photo credit: Arab American Stories

Address

416 N Saginaw St, Ste 220
Flint, MI
48502

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(810) 235-2722

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Arab American Heritage Council posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Arab American Heritage Council:

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Flint government services

Show All

Comments

Save the Date!
Dearborn's Virtual Redistricting Town Hall is LIVE NOW https://www.facebook.com/RedistrictingMI/videos/184019172818402/
Hello, I'm Zahra Ahmad, an Iraqi-American reporter at The Flint Journal. I'd like to take a moment to share my family's story of revolution, refuge and return. This story was written to connect with immigrants or children of immigrants with shared experiences growing up in the United States. Background on the project with Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and MLive.com: Being an Iraqi in the United States, I've faced challenges unique to those whose parents have sacrificed it all for their children's future. Growing up in the states, I felt assimilating was the only way I could succeed and repay my parents. After all, they'd given up the life they'd built to become strangers in a foreign country. In recent years, I realized the suppression of my Iraqi culture has made it difficult to recognize the person I had become. In February, alongside the fearlessly talented Brontë Wittpenn, I traveled to Iraq after immigrating to the states 20 years prior. There, I reunited with family, abolished stereotypes of the Middle East and strengthened the connection to my ancestral roots. This five-part series gives a voice to immigrants, people who've played a significant role in shaping our land of opportunity. To those of you reading with shared experiences, I hope this story makes you feel less alone. Please, feel free to connect with me and talk.
#TakeAKnee