Fort Drum Natural Resources

Fort Drum Natural Resources Fort Drum provides one of the largest tracts of land in the northeast region for outdoor recreation which includes hunting, fishing, trapping and more!
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Fort Drum provides one of the largest tracts of land in the northeast region available to Soldiers, their families, military retirees, DoD civilians and the general public for recreational use with approximately 70,000 acres available for hunting, fishing, trapping, bird watching, primitive camping, hiking, and berry-picking and much more! Fort Drum's Fish & Wildlife Management Program is responsible for all fish and wildlife resources on the installation. Our primary focus is to support and sustain the military mission, which takes many forms. We ensure compliance with state and federal regulations; review proposed actions for potential impacts to fish, wildlifeand their habitats; monitor various environmental parameters to maintain healthy ecosystems; promote and manage outdoor recreation; and ensure good stewardship of lands for military training and the public in perpetuity.

Mission: Please visit us at www.FortDrum.isportsman.net for more detailed information!

Operating as usual

Fort Drum Deer
12/04/2020

Fort Drum Deer

I've spent the last couple days tracking down buck 646. He had spent several days crossing back and forth across Black River. I finally found the collar and it appears he drowned on his final crossing at the spot in the first photo. He was originally captured in a drop net 3/31/2019 3.5 miles away on post by the Mt Belvedere shopette. This is only the second deer to have drowned on the project and the other one was fleeing into a lake after being injured by a coyote.

Prior to the GPS collar study we didn't know how frequently Fort Drum deer crossed Black River. We've now had 4 collared deer cross it including 2 does that left post, crossed the river, spent time outside of post, only to cross it back, and come back onto post.

We've also publicly shared the information about Buck 18 that was born on post in 2015, swam across the St. Lawrence, and was harvested in Kingston, Ontario in 2018.

11/26/2020
11/11/2020
Fall has arrived, bringing with it shorter days and cooler temperatures.  It is also the time of year when the local wil...
10/26/2020

Fall has arrived, bringing with it shorter days and cooler temperatures. It is also the time of year when the local wildlife seem to be more active as they prepare to hunker down for the long winter to come.
That being said, it is not uncommon to see a variety of wildlife in the Cantonment Area including coyotes, foxes, raccoons, and skunks; and sometimes the occasional bobcat, fisher, and bear. Always respect wildlife and maintain a safe distance. Most wildlife are simply going about their lives and they are typically seen when moving from Point A to Point B. To discourage wildlife from being attracted to residences, keep pet food indoors and only put garbage outside on the day it is to be picked up.

Photo Credits: Fort Drum Natural Resources Staff

10/16/2020

UPDATE: Training Area Access
The Training Area will be open for recreation as normal starting Saturday, October 17.

10/08/2020

TRAINING AREA RECREATION UPDATE NOTICE from iSportsman:
Most of the Training Area will be OPEN for recreation between Friday, October 9 - Monday, October 12. The Training Area will close again starting Tuesday, October 13 until Saturday, October 17. The Training Area will re-open for recreation starting Sunday, October 18. Please plan accordingly. (When the entire Training Area is closed, you will receive a message "No Activities Are Available On Your Account.")

There is still time to register for these exciting events hosted by Fort Drum Recreation!
10/08/2020

There is still time to register for these exciting events hosted by Fort Drum Recreation!

The leaves have been changing fast!  This will be another great weekend to get out and enjoy the fall colors while they ...
10/01/2020

The leaves have been changing fast! This will be another great weekend to get out and enjoy the fall colors while they last!

🍁⏰🍂 If you haven't started planning your fall adventures- now is the time! Here's the scoop for mid-point, near peak, and at peak conditions for September 30- October 6. There's no better place to enjoy the scenery than NY State Parks 📸: I LOVE NEW YORK
Week 4 report ➡️ http://ow.ly/aSaS30rcDik

09/18/2020

NOTICE TO ALL RECREATIONISTS: A large-scale military training exercises is scheduled to occur from 24 September - 17 October. Access to the training areas for recreation will not be available during this time period -- please plan accordingly.

The most beautiful time of the year in NYS!  Take a drive this weekend and enjoy some of the fall colors that are starti...
09/17/2020

The most beautiful time of the year in NYS! Take a drive this weekend and enjoy some of the fall colors that are starting to pop!

It's Week 2 of the I LOVE NEW YORK Fall Foliage Report! Significant color change is expected this weekend in the Adirondacks, Catskills, Central New York, Capital-Saratoga, Thousand Islands-Seaway, and Hudson Valley regions! 🍁🍂

Find more information on the I❤️NY website: https://bit.ly/3m6xH2d

Fort Drum Natural Resources's cover photo
09/16/2020

Fort Drum Natural Resources's cover photo

Tree of the Week - Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis)Yellow birch is a medium to large size, slow growing tree of the ...
09/16/2020

Tree of the Week - Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis)

Yellow birch is a medium to large size, slow growing tree of the northeastern hardwoods, growing in sites with moist, cool soils. Yellow birch reaches maturity at about 150 years.
The bark makes this tree easily identifiable. Much like its sister tree, paper birch, the bark of the yellow birch is thin and papery, often peeling into thin curly papery strips as the tree matures. Young saplings have smooth, shiny bronze-colored bark. The bark of mature trees becomes more reddish brown and will brake up into large plates and fissures.
The leaves are ovate shaped with doubly serrate margins, dull green in color and turning bright yellow in the fall. The twigs are very slender, yellowish brown or brown in color and are slightly aromatic with a faint wintergreen smell and taste.
The wood of the yellow birch is a favorite for furniture , cabinets, and flooring. Twigs and bark may be distilled for oil of wintergreen. The papery shreds of the bark make a great fire starter even in wet weather!
(photos taken by Amy Stiefel, Forester)

UPDATED CANTONMENT HUNTING INFO : Hunters eligible to hunt in the Cantonment Area can now view the mandatory briefing on...
09/02/2020
Home - Fort Drum - iSportsman

UPDATED CANTONMENT HUNTING INFO :
Hunters eligible to hunt in the Cantonment Area can now view the mandatory briefing on-line at https://FortDrum.iSportsman.net . See the Cantonment Area Hunting Page for details. (The briefing is on YouTube and cannot be viewed on a military computer.)

Cantonment Area hunters can sign out Deer Management Area Program (DMAP) permits at the Natural Resources Outreach Facility (Bldg. S-2507) on Tuesdays and Fridays in September (starting Friday, September 4th) from 1530-1800.

 is a U.S. Army installation in northern New York State located in the northeastern corner of Jefferson County and the northwestern corner of Lewis County; St. Lawrence County borders Fort Drum to the north.  is approximately 30 miles from Canada, 6 miles east of Interstate 81, and 10 miles northe...

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program
08/07/2020

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program

As of this week, Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) if officially confirmed within Adirondack Park according to the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation. Identified by New York State Department of Transportation field staff at the Warren County Canoe Launch on the Schroon River, samples are now at the Cornell University Insect Diagnostic Lab for further review.

A tiny, destructive, metallic green, invasive insect, EAB is responsible for killing tens of millions of Ash trees across North America since the early 2000's. EAB larvae devour trees' internal vascular systems that sit just behind an Ash's grayish, rough bark. With broken down xylem and phloem, trees can no longer transport water and nutrients that are necessary for sustaining life, thus infested plants perish within a short number of years. Since EAB often target younger trees with relatively thin bark, many infested saplings don't live long enough to reach seed production stages of life. Because of this, future generations of ash are greatly reduced and gene pools are shrinking for the plant family continent-wide.

As EAB larvae grow into adulthood, beetles emerge from the inside of the tree out by carving distinctive 1/8-inch, "D" letter shaped holes along the trunk and branches. With their distinctive shiny green wings on top and purple undersides, EAB can be present from late May through early September though are most commonly observed in the height of summer. Other signs of infestation include tree canopy dieback, yellowing, and browning of leaves.

“Unfortunately, the introduction of Emerald Ash Borer to the Adirondacks has damaging cultural, economic, and ecologic consequences,” according to APIPP Manager, Tammara Van Ryn. “’White’ or ‘American’ Ash is as American as baseball since the hard wood was the choice for baseball bat manufacturers for decades before EAB became so widespread. The loss of other varieties of ash trees impacts indigenous communities that use ash for traditional crafts including Adirondack pack baskets. Many Adirondack birds also rely on ash trees for food and for nesting.”

APIPP encourages Adirondack residents everywhere to pay close attention to signs of EAB. Two key indicators of an infestation are: 1. “Epicormic, branching,” or lots of sucker-like, new branches growing from the lower trunk of Ash, and 2. Observing woodpecker damage on trunks of trees already appearing to be in decline (yellowing leaves, leaf die back, etc). Sometimes Ash just lose leaves when experiencing seasonal drought as a survival mechanism - so these two factors are key for ID. Report observations using @nyimapinvasives

Always remember that you can prevent the spread of Emerald Ash Borer by limiting the movement and purchasing of firewood for use at home and while recreating. For more information on how to prevent the spread of Emerald Ash Borer and other invasive plants and insects visit http://adkinvasives.com/Get-Involved/Prevent-the-Spread/

#Emeraldashborer #EAB #NYInvasiveSpecies #AdirondackParkInvasivePlantProgram #APIPP #Preventthespread #NYiMapinvasives

U.S. Army Fort Drum & 10th Mountain Division
07/30/2020

U.S. Army Fort Drum & 10th Mountain Division

This post will make you itchy, just putting it out there. We had an unwelcome guest on post last week in the form of the Lone Star Tick. (No, a google search did not return results with a tiny tick in a 10-gallon hat. We did try to make this post more palatable.)

According to Fort Drum Natural Resources, this is the first known observation of a Lone Star tick on post. It's more common in the South East and Mid-Atlantic states. While it's presence isn't a huge cause for concern, this is a good reminder to use precautions when you're in the field or recreating outdoors with the family. Always check for ticks after every trip into the field, and if you get bit, tell your doctor so they can check you and treat you appropriately. You can find an article with all the tips and tricks here: https://bit.ly/3368D4l

07/27/2020

We have received a couple messages regarding sickly looking foxes in the area. Fox are very susceptible to a condition called mange, which causes them to loose their fur and look quite unhealthy.

Mange is treatable with a domestic animal, but not really for a wild animal. They are difficult to catch until their physical condition worsens when it is usually too late. They often die of infection or die of exposure later in the season when the temperature cools.

This is one of those cases where nature is allowed to run its course. Fox populations tend to be cyclic and when the numbers get high for a while, mange is often the result and then the numbers crash. Fox numbers will be at an ebb for a few years and then the population climb upwards again. Even if we successfully treated an animal, we would put it back into the environment in a stressed condition where the den sites are obviously infected with mites (that are the cause of mange), and the scenario would just be repeated.

These animals are not a threat to people or pets, but as is the case with all willdlife, DO NOT approach the fox if you see one, and keep your pets on a leash to ensure their safety.

For all of the newcomers to Fort Drum and Northern NY (or maybe you are not new to the area but would like to learn more...
07/09/2020

For all of the newcomers to Fort Drum and Northern NY (or maybe you are not new to the area but would like to learn more about our forests 😉), each week we will be highlighting a tree species that grows in our area.
We will start with a tree that is very common in both the Cantonment Area and throughout the Training Areas... the eastern white pine (Pinus strobus).

The white pine is a very large tree, with the potential to grow over 150 ft. tall. Pine trees are conifers which means they are evergreen trees that bear cones.
The branches of the tree are quite flexible. Its "leaves" are needles 2 1/2 to 5 inches in length, that are attached to the branch in clusters (fascicles) of 5. Although white pine trees do not shed all of their needles each winter, they will drop the oldest needles from its branches annually.
The bark of mature trees is dark grayish-brown, grooved and scaly in appearance. It produces cones that are 5-8 inches long.

The white pine is a valuable tree for timber, wildlife, and ornamental value.

Historically, the eastern white pine was prized by British ship builders. The biggest and tallest trees were harvested and used for ship masts, giving the white pine another name..."mast pine". During colonial times the King of England took ownership of these trees by having his agents mark them with the 'King's Broad Arrow" reserving them for use by the British Royal Navy.

Fort Drum Natural Resources's cover photo
06/29/2020

Fort Drum Natural Resources's cover photo

In honor of pollinator week, here are a few of Fort Drum's pollinators in action (Baltimore checkerspot, leaf-cutter bee...
06/23/2020

In honor of pollinator week, here are a few of Fort Drum's pollinators in action (Baltimore checkerspot, leaf-cutter bee, locust borer beetle).

It is Pollinator Week! The Fort Drum pollinator habitat project is still in the works and our staff has been continuing ...
06/22/2020

It is Pollinator Week! The Fort Drum pollinator habitat project is still in the works and our staff has been continuing to research and plan for more improvements to our wildflower field. There are many flowers blooming right now, although they sure could use some rain. To find out how to create your own pollinator habitat visit: https://www.pollinator.org/

Fort Drum Deer
06/21/2020

Fort Drum Deer

It turns out one of our cameras was in doe 641's favorite nursing sites. There is a special photo included with her and her twins. Most does at Fort Drum begin having twins annually beginning when they turn 3. The fawns are kept separate for the first couple weeks after birth as a survival strategy, and then they slowly start spending more time together when they are strong enough to run from predators.

We have been able to find some really neat plants that are not common in NY state the past few weeks!  This is a small p...
06/12/2020

We have been able to find some really neat plants that are not common in NY state the past few weeks! This is a small part of why we want to make sure invasive species do not take over our landscape.

The last species we will talk about is purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).  This is an invasive plant that is common...
06/12/2020

The last species we will talk about is purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria). This is an invasive plant that is commonly found in wet areas. Left untreated, this species can take over portions of wetlands. This plant has a pretty flower, but is another invasive plant that takes over and decreases biodiversity

We have been busy with field work and unfortunately have slacked on our invasive posts.  So sorry!  We will post informa...
06/12/2020

We have been busy with field work and unfortunately have slacked on our invasive posts. So sorry! We will post information on 2 species today.

The first species is garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata). This is a very common plant along roads and trails on Fort Drum. It is another invasive plant that is edible when it is young. It gets very bitter once flowers develop. Early leaves can be used to make pesto.

Always make sure you are fully confident in the identification of a plant before you try to forage it! If you are ever unsure with garlic mustard then break up parts of the leaf and smell it. It will have a very pungent garlicky smell.

Today's invasive plant species is common reed (Phragmites australis).  You have probably seen this tall grass growing al...
06/10/2020

Today's invasive plant species is common reed (Phragmites australis). You have probably seen this tall grass growing along highways throughout the state. This is another species that creates dense stands and pushes out native species. There is actually a native species of this grass, Phragmites americana. It has only been documented on Fort Drum in one location though.

Today's invasive plant species is Japanese knotweed (Reynoutria japonica, AKA Polygonum cuspidatum).  This "bamboo-like"...
06/09/2020

Today's invasive plant species is Japanese knotweed (Reynoutria japonica, AKA Polygonum cuspidatum). This "bamboo-like" species looks like a shrub, but is really an herbaceous plant with a hollow stem. Early shoots are edible and taste like rhubarb. Always be careful if you decide to forage invasive species because they can sprout from broken plant parts and start new infestations.

This fast growing species creates dense stands and pushes native plants out of areas they infest. This decreases biodiversity in landscapes.

The first invasive plant species we are highlighting during NY's Invasive Species Awareness Week are black and pale swal...
06/08/2020

The first invasive plant species we are highlighting during NY's Invasive Species Awareness Week are black and pale swallowwort (Cynanchum louiseae and C. rossicum). These species are both members of the Asclepiadaceae family, the same family as milkweed. This herbaceous vine is very good at dominating the landscape once established. Monarch butterflies rely on milkweed plants to survive. Research has shown that butterflies sometimes confuse the species and lay their eggs on swallowwort, which is toxic to monarch larvae.
https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/Monarch_Butterfly/documents/Swallow-wort_flyer_MJV.pdf

06/08/2020

Yesterday marked the first day of New York State's Invasive Species Awareness Week! Fort Drum's Natural Resources Branch is working vigilantly to try and stop the spread of invasive species. Stay tuned for a post about one of our priority species throughout the week.

Address


General information

Posting Guidelines. As a rule we follow the U.S. Army’s Facebook policy and use the U.S. Army’s Facebook rules of engagement as a reference and/or visit the DoD Social Media user agreement at: http://www.defense.gov/socialmedia/user-agreement.aspx. In addition to the user agreement the following rules apply: While Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management's official Facebook fan page is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you don't comply, your message will be removed: ■ We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. ■ We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. ■ The Army is prohibited from endorsing or appearing to endorse non-government organizations or individuals. Therefore, as the official Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management fan page, postings of a commercial nature, such as sales of goods or services, will be prohibited and removed. ■We do not allow comments suggesting or encouraging illegal activity. ■ You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username, and any information provided. We continue to work on and refine guidelines for use of the various Social Media sites created in the name of Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management and our community. This document, like the Social Media itself, is evolving. Online collaboration is changing how all of us work and communicate, and how we engage with each other. Social computing can help build stronger, better relationships. That comes with responsibility. If you participate in Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management social media community, please follow these "rules of engagement": ■ Stick to your area of expertise and provide unique, individual perspectives on what's going on at Fort Drum. ■ Post meaningful, respectful comments -- in other words, no spam, and no remarks that are off-topic or offensive. ■ Pause and think before posting. Reply to comments in a timely manner, when a response is appropriate. ■ Respect proprietary information and content, and confidentiality. ■ When disagreeing with others' opinions, keep it appropriate and polite. ■ Be transparent. Your honesty -- or dishonesty -- will be quickly noticed in the social media environment. Use your real name and be clear about your relationship to Fort Drum. Transparency is about your identity and relationship to Fort Drum. ■ Perception is reality. In online social networks, the lines between public and private, personal and professional are blurred. Just by identifying yourself as a Soldier, Employee or Family member affiliated with Fort Drum, you create perceptions about yourself and Fort Drum. These are the perceptions of not just our colleagues, supervisors and commanders, but of our families, friends and the general public. Do us all proud. Be sure that all content associated with you is consistent with your values and professional standards, and those of the Army and Fort Drum. ■ It's a conversation. Talk online like you would talk to real people in person. Don't be afraid to bring in your own personality and say what's on your mind. Consider content that's open-ended and invites response. Encourage comments. Be nice -- remember the Golden Rule. ■ Are you adding value? There are millions of words out there. The best way to get yours read is to write things that people will value. Social communication should be thought-provoking and build a sense of community. If it helps people improve knowledge or skills, solve problems, or understand the Army and Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management better, then it's adding value. ■ Your Responsibility: What you write is ultimately your responsibility. Participation in Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management's online community is not a right but an opportunity, so please treat it seriously and with respect. ■ Be a Leader. There can be a fine line between healthy debate and incendiary reaction. Do not use Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management's social media sites to denigrate organizations or individuals. Frame what you write to invite differing points of view without inflaming others. ■ Some topics slide very easily into sensitive territory. So be careful and considerate. Once your words are out there, you can't get them back. Inflammatory discussions will be removed by site administrators. ■ If it gives you pause, pause. If you're about to publish something that makes you even the least bit uncomfortable, take a minute to review these guidelines and try to figure out what's bothering you. Discuss it with your friends, co-workers, or spouse. Ultimately, what you publish is yours, and so is the responsibility. So be sure. Finally, the appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of Fort Drum Fish & Wildlife Management, the U.S. Army or Department of Defense.

Opening Hours

Monday 07:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 07:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 07:00 - 16:30
Thursday 07:00 - 16:30
Friday 07:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(315) 772-9303

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Fort Drum provides one of the largest tracts of land in the northeast region available to Soldiers, their families, military retirees, DoD civilians and the general public for recreational use with approximately 70,000 acres available for hunting, fishing, trapping, bird watching, primitive camping, hiking, and berry-picking and much more! The primary focus of the Fort Drum Natural Resources Branch is to support and sustain the military mission by: ensuring compliance with state and federal environmental regulations; reviewing proposed actions for potential impacts to our natural resources; monitoring various environmental parameters to maintain healthy ecosystems; promoting and managing hunting, fishing and other types of outdoor recreation; managing for healthy forests to support military training, forest product production and to improve and maintain wildlife habitat; ensuring good stewardship of lands for military training and the public in perpetuity.

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