Predeployment Training Equipment - PDTE FSGA

Predeployment Training Equipment - PDTE FSGA Pre-deployment Equipment Training Team (PDTE) Integrated Logistics Support & Services (ILSS 2)

The Pre-deployment Equipment Training Team (PDTE) is a pool of low-density, high demand, standard and non-standard equipment required to supplement AC and RC units' MTOEs as required in the Mission Essential Equipment List (MEEL). PDTE is authorized by the HQDA Army Requirements and Resourcing Board for pre-position at selected installations to support pre-deployment training requirements for equipment that would otherwise not be available to deploying units, and duplicates the equipment they will use in theatre. The PDTE pool is not designed or sized to satisfy all equipment requirements and augments unit shortages where there is a disparity between the deploying units' MTOE and its MEEL. Points of Contact: Program Manager (912) 767 - 5170 Operations Manager (912) 767 - 1685 Logistics Analyst (912) 767 - 5342 Component Hand Receipt Holder (912) 767 - 5826 Readiness/Fleet Manager (912) 767 - 8696 Master Supply Technician (912) 767 - 4447 Administrative Assistance (912) 767- 5152

Mission: The Pre-deployment Equipment Training Team (PDTE) is a pool of low-density, high demand, standard and non-standard equipment required to supplement AC and RC units' MTOEs as required in the Mission Essential Equipment List (MEEL).

05/09/2014

This day in Military History:
May 8, 2003 – The US and its allies asked the UN Security Council to legitimize their occupation of Iraq and sought permission to use revenue from the world’s second-largest oil reserves to rebuild the war-battered country.

May 8, 2003 – In northern Iraq 3 U.S. soldiers were killed when their helicopter crashed into the Tigris River.

05/02/2014

This day in Military History:
May 2, 1945 – At noon the German surrender becomes effective. The long, difficult and controversial campaign in Italy is over. Allied forces reach Trieste, Milan and Turin during the course of the day, while others are advancing north toward Brenner Pass where they will link up with US 7th Army forces from the north. Approximately 1 million German soldiers lay down their arms as the terms of the German unconditional surrender, signed at Caserta on April 29, come into effect. Many Germans surrender to Japanese soldiers-Japanese Americans. Among the American tank crews that entered the northern Italian town of Biella was an all-Nisei (second-generation) infantry battalion, composed of Japanese Americans from Hawaii. Early that same day, Russian Marshal Georgi K. Zhukov accepts the surrender of the German capital. The Red Army takes 134,000 German soldiers prisoner.

Safety Topic:
05/02/2014

Safety Topic:

May is National Military Apperciation Month:
05/02/2014

May is National Military Apperciation Month:

05/01/2014


May is National Stroke Awareness Month:

Strokes can affect people of all ages and backgrounds. Learn how to safeguard yourself against stroke.

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. In 2008 alone, more than 133,000 Americans died from stroke—or one person every four minutes—died from stroke, making it the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.

A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a blockage stops the flow of blood to the brain or when a blood vessel in or around the brain bursts. Although many people think of stroke as a condition that affects only older adults, strokes can and do occur in people of all ages. In fact, nearly a quarter of all strokes occur in people younger than age 65.

Each year, almost 800,000 strokes occur in the United States. Strokes often lead to serious, life-changing complications that include
•Paralysis or weakness on one side of the body.
•Problems with thinking, awareness, attention, learning, judgment, and memory.
•Problems understanding or forming speech.
•Difficulty controlling or expressing emotions.
•Numbness or strange sensations.
•Pain in the hands and feet.
•Depression.

To help protect yourself and your loved ones, learn what steps you can take to prevent a stroke and how to spot a stroke if one occurs.


Lowering Your Risk for Stroke

Demographic factors such as family history, age, sex, and race/ethnicity can all play a role in an individual’s stroke risk. Regardless of your background, however, there are several things you can do to lower your chances of having a stroke.

For example, cigarette smoking contributes to one in every five strokes in the United States. Smoking—and even exposure to second-hand smoke—can thicken the blood and make it more likely to clot. Thicker blood flow can lead to increased plaque buildup in your arteries and damage to the blood vessels leading to the brain, which can cause or worsen a stroke. So, quit smoking—or better yet, don’t start.

In 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services launched the Million Hearts™ initiative to prevent a million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. A primary focus is on the ABCS to prevent cardiovascular disease, including stroke, and contribute to overall health:
•Know your ABCS of health: ◦Appropriate Aspirin therapy: Ask your doctor if taking aspirin is right for you.
◦Blood pressure control: Keeping your blood pressure under control reduces your risk of heart attack and stroke. More than half of the world’s stroke deaths are caused by elevated blood pressure levels.
◦Cholesterol management: Get your cholesterol checked regularly and manage it with diet and physical activity or with medication, if needed.
◦Smoking cessation: Get help at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

•Exercise regularly.
•Eat a healthy diet that’s low in sodium.
•Maintain a healthy weight.
•Prevent or control diabetes.
•Limit your alcohol intake (fewer than two drinks per day for men, or one drink per day for women).

Recognizing the Signs of Stroke

When responding to a stroke, every minute counts. The sooner a patient receives medical treatment, the lower the risk for death or disability. If you or someone you know exhibits the following signs or symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately.
•Numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of the body.
•Confusion, trouble speaking, or difficulty understanding.
•Trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
•Trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance and coordination.
•Severe headache with no known cause.

Remember, getting immediate medical attention for stroke is crucial to preventing disability and death, so don’t delay—dial 9-1-1.

To learn more about reducing your risk for stroke, visit Million Hearts™ , a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over 5 years.

Safety Tip:
05/01/2014

Safety Tip:

Timeline Photos
04/30/2014

Timeline Photos

Safety Topic:
04/30/2014

Safety Topic:

04/30/2014

PDTE welcomes Mrs. Loretta Rose team.

03/21/2014

March Is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month:
The colon is the longest part of the large intestine and the lowest part of the digestive system. Inside the colon, water and salt from solid wastes are extracted before the waste moves through the rectum and exits the body through the anus.
What is colon cancer?

Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by out-of-control cell growth, and colon cancer forms when this uncontrolled cell growth initiates with cells in the large intestine. Most colon cancers originate from small, noncancerous (benign) tumors called adenomatous polyps that form on the inner walls of the large intestine. Some of these polyps may grow into malignant colon cancers over time if they are not removed during colonoscopy. Colon cancer cells will invade and damage healthy tissue that is near the tumor causing many complications.

After malignant tumors form, the cancerous cells may travel through the blood and lymph systems, spreading to other parts of the body. These cancer cells can grow in several places, invading and destroying other healthy tissues throughout the body. This process itself is called metastasis, and the result is a more serious condition that is very difficult to treat.

What is pain? What causes pain?
Colon cancer is not necessarily the same as rectal cancer, but they often occur together in what is called colorectal cancer. Rectal cancer originates in the rectum, which is the last several inches of the large intestine, closest to the anus.

In the United States, about 112,000 people are diagnosed with colon cancer each year.

What causes colon cancer?
Cancer is ultimately the result of cells that uncontrollably grow and do not die. Normal cells in the body follow an orderly path of growth, division, and death. Programmed cell death is called apoptosis, and when this process breaks down, cancer results. Colon cancer cells do not experience programmatic death, but instead continue to grow and divide. Although scientists do not know exactly what causes these cells to behave this way, they have identified several potential risk factors.

Safety Tip:
03/21/2014

Safety Tip:

Safety Tip:
03/20/2014

Safety Tip:

03/20/2014

March Is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month:
Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon or rectum) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Every year, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and more than 50,000 people die from it.

Little Known Black History Fact:February 27 - Figure skater Debi Thomas becomes the first African American to win a meda...
02/27/2014

Little Known Black History Fact:
February 27 - Figure skater Debi Thomas becomes the first African American to win a medal (bronze) at the winter Olympic Games in 1988.

Johnson served as a musician in  Co. C. of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Colonel Shaw referred to ...
02/21/2014

Johnson served as a musician in Co. C. of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Colonel Shaw referred to Private Alexander Johnson, a 16-year-old recruit from New Bedford, Massachusetts, as the “original drummer boy.” He was with Shaw when the colonel died at Fort Wagner and carried important messages to other officers during the battle.

Alexander H. Johnson enlisted at the age of 16 as a drummer boy in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry. He was the first black musician to enlist during the Civil War, and is depicted as the drummer leading the column of troops on the memorial honoring Colonel Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts in front of the Massachusetts state house in Boston. Alex was adopted by William Henry Johnson, the second black lawyer in the United States and close associate of Frederick Douglass. Johnson’s original surname was Howard and his mother was a Perry. His grandfather was Peter Perry, a native Hawaiian whaler who married an Indian woman.

After the war, Alex Johnson was a member of both the Grand Army of the Republic General George H. Ward Post #10 and of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War in Worcester, Massachusetts. He is frequently mentioned in the book We All Got History by Nick Salvatore. Alexander Johnson died 19 March 1930, at the age of 82, just a few weeks after the 67th anniversary of his enlistment in the 54th

LTC John A. Lewis U.S. Army (RET.) - SAVANNAH - LTC John Alan Lewis, U. S. Army (Ret.), 58, of Savannah, Georgia and hus...
02/21/2014

LTC John A. Lewis U.S. Army (RET.) - SAVANNAH - LTC John Alan Lewis, U. S. Army (Ret.), 58, of Savannah, Georgia and husband of Carol Brooks Lewis, died Wednesday morning, February 19, 2014, at his home and under the care of Hospice Savannah. Born in Greenville, South Carolina, he was a son of the late Leslie A. Lewis and the late Maribel Hill Lewis. John was a communicant of St. James Catholic Church. He was an honor graduate from Class of 1978 at The Citadel. John retired from the United States Army as a Lieutenant Colonel after serving his country for 25 years in various assignments throughout his career. After his retirement, he worked with Chatham Steel, Serco, Honeywell, and most recently with FedServices as a civilian contractor. John was a past board member of The National Museum of The Mighty Eighth Air Force. He also served as Editor of The Contrails and was a member of the Mighty Eighth Air Force Historical Society Birthplace Chapter. John was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, son and brother. Surviving are his wife of 30 years, Carol Brooks Lewis of Savannah; one daughter, Amanda Lewis of Savannah; one son, Kevin Lewis of Atlanta; one granddaughter, Kaiden; three sisters, Ann Genoble and her husband, Ralph, of Franklin, Tennessee, Kay Mittnik of Newberry, South Carolina, and Caroline Mayer and her husband, Steve, of Delafield, Wisconsin, and a number of nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends from 6 until 7:30 Friday evening at Gamble Funeral Service - 410 Stephenson Avenue, with the Rosary service being held at 7:30 in the funeral home chapel. The Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 o'clock Saturday morning at St. James Catholic Church conducted by Father Mark J. Ross. Interment, with full military honors, will be in Bonaventure Cemetery. Remembrances: The Humane Society for Greater Savannah - 7215 Sallie Mood Drive, Savannah, Georgia 31406-3922 or St. James Catholic School - 8412 Whitfield Avenue, Savannah, Georgia 31406-6198 or St. Vincent's Academy - 207 East Liberty Street, Savannah, Georgia 31401 or Benedictine Military School - 6502 Seawright Drive, Savannah, Georgia 31406. Please share your thoughts about John and his life at www.gamblefuneralservice.com. Savannah Morning News February 21, 2014 Please sign our Obituary Guest Book at savannahnow.com/obituaries.

02/21/2014

February 20 - Death of Frederick Douglass (78), Douglass was the leading Black spokesman for almost fifty years. He was a major abolitionist and a lecturer and editor. Charles Wade Barkley, basketball player, born Leeds, AL, February 20, 1963.

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day:February 19 - Vonetta Flowers became the first black gold medalist in the h...
02/19/2014

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day:
February 19 - Vonetta Flowers became the first black gold medalist in the history of the Winter Olympic Games. She and partner Jull Brakken won the inagural women's two-person bobsled event in 2002 at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Little Known Black History Fact: On this DayFebruary 13 - The first Black professional basketball team "The Renaissance"...
02/13/2014

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day
February 13 - The first Black professional basketball team "The Renaissance" organized 1923.

Little Known Black History Fact: On this DayFebruary 12 - Birthday of William Felton Russell, better known as "Bill" Rus...
02/12/2014

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day
February 12 - Birthday of William Felton Russell, better known as "Bill" Russel, he was player-coach of the Boston Celtics basketball team in 1968 and 1969. Russell was born in Monroe, Louisiana in 1934.

Bill Russell is the ultimate champion in the history of professional basketball. As the Celtics' center from 1956-69, he led the franchise to 11 titles, providing superb defense while averaging a staggering 22.5 rebounds per game. He was known for his memorable battles with -- and frequent victories over -- Wilt Chamberlain. But his legacy is hardly limited to basketball. He was a prominent member of the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in February. Scroll through this gallery to look at the life of a remarkable man.

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day February 11 - Today in 1996, Penn's Baccalaureate Speaker was the Right Rev...
02/11/2014

Little Known Black History Fact: On this Day
February 11 - Today in 1996, Penn's Baccalaureate Speaker was the Right Reverend Barbara Clementine Harris, a Philadelphian who was the first woman ever to become a bishop in the Anglican Communion.

02/10/2014

February 10 - 1964, After 10 days of debate and voting on 125 amendments, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by a vote of 290-130. The bill prohibited any state or local government or public facility from denying access to anyone because of race or ethnic origin. It further gave the U.S. Attorney General the power to bring school desegregation law suits.

Happy Birthday to Cindy Lominac:
02/07/2014

Happy Birthday to Cindy Lominac:

Little Know Black Histoy Facts: February 7 - Negro History week originated by Carter G.Woodson is observed for the first...
02/07/2014

Little Know Black Histoy Facts: February 7 - Negro History week originated by Carter G.Woodson is observed for the first time in 1926.

Carter G. Woodson was the son of former slaves James and Eliza Riddle Woodson. His father had helped the Union soldiers during the Civil War, and afterwards he moved his family to West Virginia where a high school for blacks was being built. Coming from a large, poor family, Carter could not regularly attend school, but through self-instruction he was able to master the fundamentals of common school subjects by the time he was 17.

In 1895, at the age of 20, Woodson entered Douglass High School where he received his diploma in less than two years. From 1897 to 1900, he began teaching in Fayette County, and he later became the principal of his own alma mater. Woodson finally received his bachelor's degree from Berea College in Kentucky. From 1903 to 1907 he was a school supervisor in the Philippines. He then attended the University of Chicago where he received his master's in 1908, and in 1912, he received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University.

In 1915, Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland co-founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH). The organization was the platform that launched Woodson's mission to raise awareness and recognize the importance of Black history. He believed that publishing scientific history about the black race would produce facts that would prove to the world that Africa and its people had played a crucial role in the development of civilization. Thus he established a scholarly journal, The Journal of Negro History, a year after he formed the ASNLH.

Seeing the need to spread the news about Black history to the general public as well as scholars, Woodson and the ASNLH pioneered the celebration of "Negro History Week" in 1926, which has since been extended to the entire month of February. Even with the monumental duties connected with the association, Woodson still found time to write extensive and scholarly works such as “The History of the Negro Church” (1922), "The Mis-Education of the Negro" (1933) and many other books that continue to have wide readership today. Woodson's other far-reaching activities included the organization in 1920 of the Associated Publishers, the oldest African American publishing company in the United States.

Woodson is buried at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery in Suitland-Silver Hill, Md. His Washington, D.C., home has been preserved as the Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site.

Address

834 W 6th St, Bldg 1509
Fort Stewart, GA
31314

General information

Hours of operation: Normal business hours for the PDTE site are Monday through Friday 0730 to 1630 hours or by appointment with prior coordination. The office is located at 843 W. 6th Street, Bldg. 1509, Fort Stewart Georgia, 31314. For more information about PDTE, please can contact: Points of Contact: Program Manager (912) 767 - 5170 Operations Manager (912) 767 - 1685 Logistics Analyst (912) 767 - 5342 Component Hand Receipt Holder (912) 767 - 5826 Readiness/Fleet Manager (912) 767 - 8696 Master Supply Technician (912) 767 - 4447 Administrative Assistance (912) 767- 5152

Opening Hours

Monday 07:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 07:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 07:30 - 16:30
Thursday 07:30 - 16:30
Friday 07:30 - 16:30

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Predeployment Training Equipment - PDTE FSGA posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Fort Stewart government services

Show All