Preserve Granbury

Preserve Granbury Preserving and promoting the historic integrity of our community.

Growth is inevitable and desirable, but destruction of community character is not. The question is not whether your part of the world is going to change, the question is how. - Edward T. McMahon

Mission: Founded in 2005, Preserve Granbury is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that works to preserve and promote the historic integrity of our community.

President Johnson’s PRESERVED Austin office.
06/27/2019
Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum

President Johnson’s PRESERVED Austin office.

#LBJInTheNews via Austin Monthly: On the top floor of a nondescript office building in downtown Austin exists a slice of political history that few have seen.

Looking forward to Ramay - Macatee Civil War Symposium, Sept 21, 2019
06/23/2019

Looking forward to Ramay - Macatee Civil War Symposium, Sept 21, 2019

A Symposium is a formal gathering in an academic setting where participants are experts in their fields. These experts present or deliver their opinions or viewpoints on a chosen topic of discussion. There are the usual discussions on the chosen topic after the experts have presented their speeches. The chief characteristic of a symposium is that it covers a single topic or subject and all the lectures given by experts are completed in a single day.
September 21
http://bit.ly/CivilWarSymposiumTickets

A great PRESERVATION story out of Dallas
06/22/2019
D Magazine

A great PRESERVATION story out of Dallas

Now a designated historic landmark, Bella Villa is ready for new residents.

Today, Mineral Wells and it’s fabled Baker Hotel will begin a massive PRESERVATION project scheduled to be completed in ...
06/20/2019
Developers of Historic Baker Hotel Reveal $65M Restoration Plans

Today, Mineral Wells and it’s fabled Baker Hotel will begin a massive PRESERVATION project scheduled to be completed in 2022. Congratulations on the restoration of this amazing icon!

In its prime, Mineral Wells' Baker Hotel was the place to see and been seen. On Thursday, a $65 million restoration project will begin to bring this piece of Texas history back to life.

Texas PRESERVED County Court Houses
06/19/2019
Texas Association of Counties

Texas PRESERVED County Court Houses

There are more than 20 Romanesque Revival courthouses across Texas. How many have you visited?

This article features Karnes, Bexar, Lavaca and Maverick counties.

One of PRESERVED Granbury's most fun holidays!
06/18/2019

One of PRESERVED Granbury's most fun holidays!

Granbury knows how to celebrate the 4th!
Granbury Chamber of Commerce's Hometown Parade begins at 10:00 am July 4th. Remember it leaves the high school at 10 traveling east on Pearl St., loops the Square and travels back west on Bridge.
Info to join the parade and more about the big celebration
is here - http://www.granburychamber.com/pages/th-of-july

September 21, 2019. Ramay - Macatee Lecture series Civil War Symposium
06/17/2019

September 21, 2019. Ramay - Macatee Lecture series Civil War Symposium

The Ramay/Macatee Speaker Series returns September 21, 2019.
Learn from a “Dream Team” lineup of four nationally known Civil War professors, historians and authors who be speaking at an all day symposium format event.

Steven. E. Woodworth is a professor of history at Texas Christian University, and an acknowledged expert on the Civil War.
Topic: “Storming the Fortress: C.F. Smith’s Charge on the Confederate Right”

Location: The New Granbury Live
Reservations are required so purchase early. http://bit.ly/CivilWarSymposiumTickets

An amazing historic home filled with the stories that make Granbury what it is!  Visit #Bridgestreethistorycenter
06/14/2019

An amazing historic home filled with the stories that make Granbury what it is! Visit #Bridgestreethistorycenter

The Bridge Street History Center is open on Saturdays. Stop by and learn about our lectures and the exciting Civil War Symposium – Ramay/Macatee Speaker Series as well as tour this historical home. Learn about the family and folks who contributed to Granbury as a community. Explore the history where you visit. Just a few blocks east of the Square on Bridge Street Follow us on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bridgestreethistorycenter

Watch it on TV tomorrow morning!
06/08/2019

Watch it on TV tomorrow morning!

YOLO Everyone! The YOLO TX show was in Granbury shooting for an upcoming episode! It will air on June 9 at 9:30 AM on @CW33 Tune in to see Granbury!!

06/08/2019
YOLO TX

YOLO TX featuring our beautiful town Of Granbury - look for it Sunday morning 9:30 on KDAF (cw)

There is an authentic Texas experience awaiting you in Granbury, Texas. Visit Granbury the most historic small town in the nation to enjoy a lively hub of attractions, entertainment, and adventure! 🎶🍷👻

You’re not going to want to miss highlights of this town like Granbury Ghosts and Legends Tour, The New Granbury Live, Granbury Wine Walk, Red (on the granbury square), The Pan Handle , and Nutshell Eatery & Bakery all with the comfort of staying at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites Granbury. #VisitGranbury

Those were the days
06/03/2019

Those were the days

Traces of Texas reader Ricky Williams visited the last extant Republic of Texas sovereign markers and kindly shared these photos with TOT.

In order to show foreigners that they were entering sovereign land, granite markers were driven into the ground along the Republic’s borders. Today there is only one of these boundary markers still on the job.

Dating back to 1840, this last of the known markers is 10 miles southeast of Deadwood, Texas (yes, it really is called Deadwood) on Farm-to-Market Road 31. Its role is unofficial now, except to let you know when you’ve left Louisiana, and give you a little history of the old Republic and the disputed border along the Sabine River. There were many of these stone markers at the time, but this one, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, is the only one that hasn’t either disappeared or sunk into the river.

The granite pillar is nine inches square, and sticks up about four feet from the ground. An accompanying plaque notes that it’s actually ten feet long, which means it’s buried several more feet—a feature that has kept it from being stolen, at least on one reported occasion. Three sides are engraved, providing all the necessary details: Merid. Boundary, Established A.D., 1840* on one side, and sides two and three simply say U.S. and R.T., just to make sure you knew which side you were on. It is the only know international boundary marker inside of the United States.

Thank you, Ricky. This is such a cool deal!

Update on Alamo Preservation
05/31/2019

Update on Alamo Preservation

Current Preservation Work: Building and Wall Scans
Scans of each of the historic structures can give us a wealth of information.
First, the scans will create a perfectly to scale map of the structures, which in itself is useful but can also be used as a starting point to monitor any changes in the structure.
Secondly, the scans show us where voids are located in the walls, as well as moisture and salt content. By tracking the moisture and salt levels, preservationists will be able to determine which is responsible for deterioration in each area.

#PreservationMonth #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoryHappensHere

Some San Antonio information ....
05/31/2019

Some San Antonio information ....

During the Texas Revolution, San Antonio was the site of several key battles, including the Siege of Béxar and the famous Battle of the Alamo.

At the time, Military Plaza was an open training ground where troops assembled and drilled in formation. It was also the scene of a momentous transfer of power at the conclusion of the Texas Revolution in 1836.

After Mexican dictator Santa Anna had triumphed at the Siege of the Alamo in March 1836, Mexico firmly controlled the city. Even after the decisive Texian victory at San Jacinto on April 21, the Mexicans continued to occupy it. Not until June did the Béxar garrison actually surrender.

Fittingly, the person to accept the Mexican surrender was Juan Seguín, a Tejano born in San Antonio—and by then, the city’s highest military commander.

Military Plaza offers the modern visitor the chance to experience a wide variety of architectural styles covering more than 200 years.

Notice the Italian Renaissance Revival architecture of City Hall as you make your way to the Main Plaza (also known as Plaza de Armas), with the restored Romanesque Revival style Bexar County Courthouse and the grand San Fernando Cathedral (pictured), one of the nation's oldest active cathedrals.

Many of the original buildings are now restaurants, banks, and government offices. The historic plaza, just a short distance from The San Antonio River Walk, is still a thriving center of life in San Antonio, a popular destination with locals and tourists alike.

An important read after the total loss of the Ambassador Hotel in Dallas and the importance of PRESERVATION.
05/29/2019
The Dallas Morning News

An important read after the total loss of the Ambassador Hotel in Dallas and the importance of PRESERVATION.

If we can find any silver lining in these losses, it should come as a reminder of just how much we value the works of architecture that define our cities, a lesson we too often forget.

05/28/2019
WFAA

The oldest existing hotel property in Dallas, completely destroyed

WATCH LIVE: An aerial view of the vacant Ambassador Hotel in Dallas destroyed in a fire, earlier Tuesday morning.

Remembering ...
05/27/2019

Remembering ...

Lovely Memorial Day Ceremony this morning. Thank you to all the organizers and committees who made this possible.
📷 Michelle Winters

Remembering ...
05/27/2019

Remembering ...

Today as we enjoy and have fun with festivals, shopping, and eating burgers let us all remember those who gave their lives and the ultimate sacrifice. Be sure and stop by @granburyfieldofflags and reflect on this day. Beautiful photo provided by @edgarmillerimages

Haven’t read this, but I plan to.  I’ve read enough about Jacksboro Hwy to know there’ll be good stories in this book.
05/25/2019

Haven’t read this, but I plan to. I’ve read enough about Jacksboro Hwy to know there’ll be good stories in this book.

Do any of y'all ever order a used book from Amazon that takes 4 weeks to ship, completely forget about it and then, when it arrives, view it somehow as an anonymous gift from generous, benevolent fates? You can tell by the wrapping that it's a book and you ask yourself which one it is but you can't remember, which is why the unveiling is such a delight, like a little mini-Christmas that you just had for yourself. After you unwrap it you silently congratulate yourself for your brilliance in choosing THIS particular title, knowing that you will be edified in some way that your friends will not be ------ a delicious little thrill. This morning "Gamblers and Gangsters: Fort Worth's Jacksboro Highway in the 1940s and 1950s" by Ann Arnold showed up. Can't wait to dive in.

Preserve Granbury has a new venue this year!  We are sponsoring MoonShine at Sunset!  Hold your spot soon.  We will have...
05/20/2019

Preserve Granbury has a new venue this year! We are sponsoring MoonShine at Sunset! Hold your spot soon. We will have 35 tables (8 Chairs each table). More information coming soon! There will be limited seating! Save the date now!

Have you ever been to Barton Springs?
05/20/2019

Have you ever been to Barton Springs?

Clear and icy, Barton Springs has drawn Indians, pioneers, and now tourists and residents to this swimming hole in present-day Austin. The waters are brought from the limestone strata to the surface by the Balcones Fault, which bisects Central Texas.

The average flow is 27 million gallons daily. During 1730–31, Spanish friars located three missions here. Colorful settler William "Uncle Billy" Barton patented the land about 1837, naming two of the springs for his daughters Parthenia and Eliza.

His two tame baby buffalos soon began to attract sightseers to his place, in spite of constant danger from Indian attacks. As the place gained in popularity, one astute Austin merchant installed a merry-go-round and rented bathing suits to swimmers. In 1871, he and several others built ice-making machines at the springs.

In addition, flour mills, sawmills, and a quarry appeared along the creek banks. About 1875, the riverboat "Sunbeam" ran excursions to Barton's at $.50 per round trip.

At one point, a ferry was located here on a main road to Austin. Between 1901 and 1913, merchant A. J. Zilker bought the land, and beginning in 1918 he deeded it to the people of Austin for use as a park.

Another beautifully preserved Texas landmark
05/16/2019

Another beautifully preserved Texas landmark

Historic James Dunn Houston House in Gonzales, Texas.

Cattle baron James Dunn Houston built his Victorian house in 1898 in Gonzales, Texas. The mansion construction started three years earlier in 1895. The house has fifteen main rooms, five bathrooms and several halls and walkways. Each of the main rooms has it's own uniquely designed fireplace. The house foyer still has two canvas wall murals that were bought in New Orleans when the house was constructed. The house is located at 619 St. Lawrence St.

Photo by Bonnie Gresham Davidson.

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas
05/16/2019
The Daughters of the Republic of Texas

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas

Four years ago, the Daughters placed a Historic Sites marker on this landmark. Was really exciting to see the RT on one side of the boundary marker and US on the other side.

Carnton
05/08/2019

Carnton

The day after the Battle of Franklin, the bodies of four Confederate generals, Patrick Cleburne, Otho Strahl, Hiram Granbury, and John Adams, were taken to the back porch at Carnton where their men paid respects to their fallen leaders. Two other generals, John C. Carter and States R. Gist, were mortally wounded in the battle. Because the bodies of two other officers were taken to Carnton as well, this has added many to mistakenly assume that all six generals were taken the Carnton on December 1. This is clearly impossible, as John C. Carter was still very much alive, dying from his wounds on December 10, 1864 at the Harrison House.

This photo shows members of the McGavock family gathered on Carnton's back porch in 1905, years after the Battle of Franklin. Learn more about the post-war history of Carnton in the newest episode of TENN in 20: Official Podcast of the Battle of Franklin Trust. Episodes are available on all major podcast apps, and from our website here: boft.org/podcast

Waiting for it to start
05/04/2019

Waiting for it to start

There are several excellent seats for tonight's Cash and Cline show. But don't wait.
www.thenewgranburylive.com

Texas Highways Magazine
05/01/2019

Texas Highways Magazine

Thanks to reader Katheryn Jager for sharing this photo of Presidio la Bahía in Goliad. She came upon the scene while driving in search of wildflowers. "The contrast of the chapel’s muted stone walls against blue skies and a tapestry of wildflowers below was simply breathtaking," she says. #TrueTexas

Did you vote today?  Granbury is now #2
04/30/2019
Visit Granbury

Did you vote today? Granbury is now #2

Granbury is in the running to be America’s Favorite Historic Small Town! Go to the link and vote for Granbury!

new statues at the Alamo
04/29/2019

new statues at the Alamo

It's an exciting day at the Alamo!
Today we have a crew carefully placing 6 bronze sculptures in Cavalry Courtyard.
The first two placed this morning were William B. Travis and John William Smith, they'll be followed by David Crockett, Susanna Dickinson, James Bowie, and Josè Antonio Navarro.
We'll share closeups of the sculptures along with the artist information when the sculptures are securely in place.

04/29/2019
Keystone Star Hotel

Amazing restoration / remodel in Lampasas - Keystone Star Hotel - take a look at their F B page to see how far they've come and what an amazing job they're doing.

It was definitely a work weekend at the Keystone Star Hotel! Here's a video to give you a glimpse. The orange color you see on the flooring is a filler that is used to plug nail holes and gaps.

Frank and Joe begin staining the upstairs flooring today. It will get two coats of stain, two coats of polyurethane, and a final coat once all other interior work is completed. Not sure you remember how bad the flooring was but Frank and Joe have performed miracles replacing bad pieces, plugging huge holes that had been cut into the original flooring, removing black tar and paint, and making it look new. We'll post more photos once the stain is down.

Sam Summers is continuing to work through an extensive punch list of doors and trim.

In addition, all of the furniture that was moved in to stage for the homes tour in December was moved out on Sunday because (drum roll) the 2800 feet of 1800s, 2 1/4", oak flooring is being installed in all of the downtairs rooms, including the bedrooms, today! It will acclimate for a week or so before getting the finishing touches so we will bring you photos soon.

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Granbury, TX
76048

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