NASA’s Orion Spacecraft

NASA’s Orion Spacecraft NASA's Next Human Exploration Spacecraft -NASA's Spacecraft to serve as the primary crew vehicle for missions beyond LEO
-Capable of conducting regular in-space operations (rendezvous, docking, extravehicular activity) in conjunction with payloads delivered by SLS for missions beyond LEO
-Capability to be a backup system for ISS cargo and crew delivery

09/25/2021

It’s #NationalComicBookDay and we’re celebrating with the official release of “First Woman, NASA’s Promise for Humanity.” 💫

This graphic novel and interactive experience tells the story of fictional character Callie Rodriguez, the first woman on the Moon. https://go.nasa.gov/3CJMMOF

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post
09/23/2021

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post

09/22/2021
Timeline Photos
09/21/2021

Timeline Photos

How does the Gateway compare in size to the International Space Station? The Gateway is about one-sixth the size of the ISS and can support four crew members for 30 – 60 days while NASA’s Orion Spacecraft is docked.

Timeline Photos
09/21/2021

Timeline Photos

Flight Director Maria shares the role of autonomous technology in #BuildtoLaunch Operation Auto-Pilot. In this mission, students use the engineering design approach to create vehicles inspired by the ones used on the moon and mars! Visit to begin this mission #STEAM #NASA https://bit.ly/3hRg85E

09/21/2021

They grow up so fast 🥲

In this view from March 14, 2020, the Orion spacecraft for the Artemis I mission sits in the Thermal Vacuum Chamber at NASA’s Neil A. Armstrong Test Facility. The spacecraft had just completed testing where it was subjected to the extreme temperatures and electromagnetic environment it will experience during Artemis missions.

This month, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center teams finished installing four ogives – the protective panels on the launch abort system assembly that shield the upper portion of the Orion spacecraft during its entry into orbit. Once final checkouts are complete, Orion will be moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building and integrated with NASA’s Space Launch System rocket in preparation for #Artemis I.

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post
09/20/2021

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post

Artemis I will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, Space ...
09/14/2021

Artemis I will be the first integrated flight test of NASA’s deep space exploration system: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the ground systems at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. During this flight, the uncrewed Orion spacecraft will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and travel thousands of miles beyond the Moon, farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown, over the course of about a three-week mission.

See more great images by Orion intern Liam Yanulis on Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasaorion/albums/72157633479431041

09/10/2021

We had the honor of welcoming Scripps National Spelling Bee champion Zaila Avant-garde to NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.

We're thrilled she took the time to meet with our astronauts, and hope to one day have her join the NASA family!

Technicians at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility completed the welding on Orion's pressure vessel which will carry NASA A...
09/10/2021

Technicians at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility completed the welding on Orion's pressure vessel which will carry NASA Astronauts to the Moon on Artemis III. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/next-generation-of-orion-spacecraft-in-production-for-future-artemis-missions

Technicians at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility completed the welding on Orion's pressure vessel which will carry NASA Astronauts to the Moon on Artemis III. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/next-generation-of-orion-spacecraft-in-production-for-future-artemis-missions

At Kennedy Space Canter, all four launch abort system ogive fairings are now installed on the #Artemis I Orion spacecraf...
09/08/2021

At Kennedy Space Canter, all four launch abort system ogive fairings are now installed on the #Artemis I Orion spacecraft. The ogive fairings protect the crew module in case the abort system is activated on the launch pad or during ascent.

At Kennedy Space Canter, all four launch abort system ogive fairings are now installed on the #Artemis I Orion spacecraft. The ogive fairings protect the crew module in case the abort system is activated on the launch pad or during ascent.

09/03/2021

The core stage inter-tank umbilical – one of multiple connections on the mobile launcher that will provide power, communications, and pressurized gases to the rocket – is attached to NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) core stage inside High Bay 3 of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Before NASA’s Orion Spacecraft can be stacked atop the SLS, teams are conducting various tests to ensure the rocket can properly communicate with the ground systems equipment that will be used for launch. The first in an increasingly complex set of missions, Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system prior to crewed flights to the Moon. Through Artemis, NASA will send the first woman and the first person of color to the lunar surface, as well as establish a sustainable presence on and around the Moon.

09/02/2021

The third ogive fairing for NASA’s Orion Spacecraft that will fly on the Artemis I mission is attached to the spacecraft’s launch abort system (LAS) inside the Launch Abort System Facility high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Sept. 1, 2021.

The ogives consist of four protective panels that will shield the crew module from the severe vibrations and sounds it will experience during launch. During Artemis missions, the 44-foot-tall LAS will detach from the spacecraft when it is no longer needed. Launching in 2021, Artemis I will be an uncrewed test of Orion and the Space Launch System rocket as an integrated system ahead of crewed flights to the Moon.

08/30/2021

✔️ The second ogive fairing has been installed on the launch abort system for Orion Spacecraft's #Artemis I mission! The ogives consist of four protective panels that'll shield the crew module during launch.

More photos: https://go.nasa.gov/3kFkrBA

08/27/2021

LIVE IN FIVE: International Space Station Astronauts Megan McArthur and Thomas Pesquet, along with experts from Northrop Grumman Corporation will discuss the importance of the Habitation and Logistics Module, the initial crew cabin for #Artemis astronauts visiting the Gateway: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

08/24/2021

Technicians and engineers with Exploration Ground Systems and Jacobs connect the ogive fairings for Orion’s Artemis I mission to the launch abort system (LAS) inside the Launch Abort System Facility high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Aug. 20, 2021.

The ogives are four protective panels that will shield the crew module from the severe vibrations and sounds it will experience during launch. During Artemis missions, the 44-foot-tall LAS will detach from the spacecraft when it is no longer needed. Launching in 2021, Artemis I will be an uncrewed test of the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket as an integrated system ahead of crewed flights to the Moon.

The team at Kennedy Space Center started installing the ogive fairings on the Artemis I Orion spacecraft. The fairings p...
08/19/2021

The team at Kennedy Space Center started installing the ogive fairings on the Artemis I Orion spacecraft. The fairings protect the crew module from sound and vibration in case the abort system is activated on the pad or during ascent.

Timeline Photos
08/18/2021

Timeline Photos

“I remember laying in a hospital bed thinking that I’d never get to fly fighter jets, or fly into space. But, as I researched all the things NASA does, I realized my future could still be in our space program.”

Cody Kelly enhances safety for #Artemis astronauts journeying to and from the Moon as NASA’s Search and Rescue Office’s deputy mission manager for national affairs. https://go.nasa.gov/380Nw4t

Timeline Photos
08/17/2021

Timeline Photos

The first piece of flight hardware for #Artemis II, the first crewed NASA Artemis mission and the second flight of the SLS rocket, is in Florida. The Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage provides the in-space propulsion needed to send NASA’s Orion Spacecraft and its crew on a precise trajectory to the Moon. MORE >> https://go.nasa.gov/3snkrtC

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post
08/15/2021

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post

08/12/2021

SPOTTED 👀 Inside of the Orion Spacecraft stage adapter, you'll find small satellites, called CubeSats, secured and ready to go for the #Artemis I flight!

The ring-shaped stage adapter will be connected to NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage, and the Orion spacecraft will be secured on top: https://go.nasa.gov/3iIvytG

Timeline Photos
08/10/2021

Timeline Photos

Flight software: installed ✅

The flight software will help steer, fly, track, and guide NASA's Space Launch System during the #Artemis I launch and ascent to space. Next up: final checkouts and tests to certify the software for the mission. https://go.nasa.gov/3xFSMox

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post
08/04/2021

Photos from NASA's Exploration Ground Systems's post

Photos from NASA's Space Launch System's post
08/03/2021

Photos from NASA's Space Launch System's post

07/26/2021

Photo from the recent installation of the secondary payloads into the Orion Stage Adapter (OSA) in the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) High Bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. These Artemis I CubeSats from NASA, international partners, academia, and industry will execute a variety of experiments.

The team at NASA's Kennedy Space Center has attached the launch abort tower to the Orion spacecraft. We will attach ogiv...
07/23/2021

The team at NASA's Kennedy Space Center has attached the launch abort tower to the Orion spacecraft. We will attach ogive fairings to encapsulate the crew module ahead of moving the spacecraft to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking atop the SLS rocket.

The team at NASA's Kennedy Space Center has attached the launch abort tower to the Orion spacecraft. We will attach ogive fairings to encapsulate the crew module ahead of moving the spacecraft to the Vehicle Assembly Building for stacking atop the SLS rocket.

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NASA’S ORION SPACECRAFT

For the first time in a generation, NASA is building a deep space human spacecraft that will usher in a new era of exploration into deep space. Orion will operate in a challenging environment far from Earth. It will be the most capable spacecraft in the world, with a versatile design containing the systems and safety features to serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain astronauts during increasingly long and challenging missions thousands of miles from Earth, and provide safe re-entry under deep space return velocities.

NASA is building a sustainable presence on and around the Moon as part of the Artemis Program. The journey begins with the Orion spacecraft – NASA’s next generation spaceship that will launch atop the world’s most powerful rocket to take astronauts on a journey of exploration to the Moon and on to Mars. Orion is part of NASA’s backbone for deep space exploration, along with the Space Launch System rocket and the lunar Gateway.

To protect astronauts on these long-duration missions and return them safely to Earth, Orion engineers have woven innovative technology, advanced systems and state-of-the-art thermal protection into the fabric of the spacecraft. The team behind Orion has built upon the past 50 years of space exploration experience in human spaceflight, launch operations, robotic precursor missions, in-space construction and mission management.

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