Gulf Coast Section SEPM

Gulf Coast Section SEPM The Gulf Coast Section is the largest section of SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

Operating as usual

06/02/2021
Timeline Photos
05/18/2021

Timeline Photos

Dear All

The #TMSoc Nannofossil Group is hosting the next 'Cocco Catch-Up' which will take place on Wednesday 9th June 2021. This will be hosted virtually, starting at 12:30 UTC (13:30 in the UK).

This event offers an informal opportunity to present and discuss ongoing work, recent progress and new ideas, without the confines/commitment of producing a formal ‘conference-ready’ talk. These occasions have been highly productive in the past and we hope that it will stimulate some useful discussion within our Nannofossil community.

More details and expressing interest in the following link – https://www.tmsoc.org/cocco-catch-up/

Timeline Photos
05/11/2021

Timeline Photos

The International Nannoplankton Association (INA) and the Aurora, Science Communications, invite you to the next #Nannotalk (of vol. 2) - 'Effects of trace metal release from volcanic eruptions on coccolithophore growth and calcification' by Giulia Faucher.

Join our Youtube/Zoom channels on the 21st of May 2021 at 14h UTC and ask Giulia about her research.

'Seawater trace metals have a pivotal influence on ocean productivity since they are required by phytoplankton for numerous cellular processes and influence the structure of natural communities. Deposition of airborne ash from volcanic eruptions has the potential to inject a significant number of bioavailable metals into seawater, affecting marine primary productivity and increasing or decreasing phytoplankton biomass in the open ocean.'

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzvtI1fp2nAK7p7zBi9Q0UQ
Zoom room: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83087667792

Timeline Photos
04/29/2021

Timeline Photos

A new virtual conference for Geoscience Students!

The Geological Society of London @geolsoc is hosting GASS (Geologist's Association Student Symposium) once more, this year!

The theme is 'Geoscience in wider society: What difference will your research make?' and will take place on the 20th-21st of May :)

04/22/2021

Check out another video of #Nannotalks (vol. 1) that is being released today! 😃

Geological problem solving using integrated biostratigraphy: quantitative charts as an essential tool by Dr. Marcie Phillips, University of Texas, Austin (USA).

📆 Tune in following the link below and make sure you do not miss a new video ;)

https://youtu.be/Ss3KYzE8Vrw

04/15/2021

#Nannotalks (vol. 1) are still being released with a new video coming out! :D

Episode II, Chapter III (Paleoceanography): Middle Eocene to Late Oligocene climate variability: a new integrated calcareous nannofossil and magnetostratigraphic record from the Equatorial Indian Ocean by Giuliana Villa, Professor at University of Parma (Italy)

📆 Tune in to the YouTube channel below - https://youtu.be/Ss3KYzE8Vrw

04/13/2021

The next video of #Nannotalks is released tomorrow, Tuesday, at 10 am COT (16 hrs CET). Make sure you do not miss it, folks ;)

Chapter III, Episode 1 - 'Late Miocene calcareous nannofossil succession in the W Mediterranean: the paleoceanographic and biochronological connection' by José-Abel Flores, Professor at University of Salamanca, Spain.

Link can be found here - https://youtu.be/eR77RmqW2hg

120 Years of Earthquakes and Their Tsunamis: 1901-2020
04/13/2021
120 Years of Earthquakes and Their Tsunamis: 1901-2020

120 Years of Earthquakes and Their Tsunamis: 1901-2020

This animation shows every recorded earthquake in sequence as they occurred from January 1, 1901, through December 31, 2020, at a rate of 1 year per second. ...

Timeline Photos
04/02/2021

Timeline Photos

#ForamFriday with Antarcticella pauciloculata! This species is a planktic (floating) foraminifera that evolved after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, but it's ancestor was likely a benthic (bottom-dwelling) foram! This foram was restricted to living in the Southern Hemisphere.

03/22/2021

Next video of #Nannotalks series is being released tomorrow, Tuesday 23rd March, at 10 am COT (16hrs CET) on this channel - https://youtu.be/OKxCw1MO0Gs

Tune and watch the first episode of Chapter II: Orbital cycles, climates, and coccolithophores by Luc Beaufort, Aix-Marseille University (France).

Timeline Photos
01/29/2021

Timeline Photos

#ForamFriday with Pearsonites anapetes! This planktic #foraminifera lived for a very short time during the Eocene. It occupied surface layers within tropical to subtropical regions of the world #ocean.

Chasing the effects of dust deposition on coccolithophores living across the Atlantic Ocean — CHASE
01/18/2021
Chasing the effects of dust deposition on coccolithophores living across the Atlantic Ocean — CHASE

Chasing the effects of dust deposition on coccolithophores living across the Atlantic Ocean — CHASE

We present you CHASE, a new project that aims to expand existing knowledge on the transatlantic export productivity of coccolithophores gained from DUSTCO towards an environmentally broader perspective, spanning tropical, subtropical, temperate, subpolar and polar waters across the entire Atlantic O

IRIS Earthquake Science
12/29/2020

IRIS Earthquake Science

Are you a US based undergraduate interested in working on a seismological research project this summer? If so, consider applying for an a paid summer internship in the IRIS Summer Internship Program.

The application deadline is February 1.

https://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/about

International Nannoplankton Association
12/26/2020

International Nannoplankton Association

On behalf of the International Nannoplankton Association, we wish you Merry Christmas full of health and smiles, and a Happy and Safer New Year! 😀

Photo courtesy - Mariem Saavedra

AAPG Women's Network
11/09/2020

AAPG Women's Network

AAPG Women's Network hosts Dr. Lisa Goggin, senior geologist and research scientist at Chevron, in her live online Distinguished Lecture presentation, Computational Stratigraphy: Exploring the Limits of Seismic Interpretation Techniques.

The DL talk will air 4 Nov. | 11:30 a.m. CST, moderated by Rebecca Caldwell, research geoscientist, Chevron.

FREE registration: http://ow.ly/jatv50C9pxR
Brought to you by the AAPG/AAPG Foundation Distinguished Lecture program. #WomenGeoscientists #ComputationalStratigraphy #AAPG #femalegeologist #geology #oilandgas #seismic

Geologists' Association
10/31/2020

Geologists' Association

An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years
09/11/2020
An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years

An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years

Deep-sea benthic foraminifera preserve an essential record of Earth's past climate in their oxygen- and carbon-isotope compositions. However, this record lacks sufficient temporal resolution and/or age control in some places to determine which climate forcing and feedback mechanisms were most import...

Ancient Earth
08/31/2020
Ancient Earth

Ancient Earth

Earth looked very different long ago. Search for addresses across 750 million years of Earth's history.

International Nannoplankton Association
08/25/2020

International Nannoplankton Association

Can coccolith morphology serve as a reliable proxy to reconstruct environmental conditions of the past?

Find useful answers at the paper of Faucher et al. 2020 😁

https://cp.copernicus.org/articles/16/1007/2020/

07/23/2020
IRIS Earthquake Science

IRIS Earthquake Science

Watch the waves from the M7.8 Alaska earthquake roll across seismic stations in North America!

This animation, called a Ground Motion Visualization (GMV), shows the motion of the ground as detected on seismometers across North America - each dot is a seismic station and when the ground moves up it turns red and when it moves down it turns blue.

Waves generated by an earthquake travel around and through the earth, but they get smaller (attenuate) as they move away from the earthquake location, just like ripples in a pond. Once the earthquake waves are far enough away from the location where the earthquake occurred they can no longer be felt by people, BUT they can still be detected by sensitive seismic instruments. That's what this animation is showing - the waves from the M7.8 earthquake traveling both through the earth and across earth's surface - in the continental US the earthquake the waves are much too small to feel but not too small to measure. The scale is along the bottom. It is in micrometers (microns). For reference, the diameter of a human hair is ~50-75 microns.

The star shows the location of the earthquake. The green triangle is the station recording the seismogram shown along the bottom. The red line between the 2 is the "great circle path".

*Some of the instruments look like they are experiencing shaking before the seismic waves arrive. This is due to the setting of the animation and the calibration of the seismic instrument.

**The video is not reflecting the actual speed of the waves; it has been sped up. The time is shown along the bottom

This particular GMV is a brand new beta product generated using the vertical component of our Ground Motion Visualization (GMV). To produce a better coverage, the video is based on all available stations from any FDSN data center, using the fedcatalog service (http://service.iris.edu/irisws/fedcatalog/1/). The video uses the available BHZ, LHZ, or HHZ channel to produce the video, therefore provides a better coverage.

To see more GMV's visits http://ds.iris.edu/spud/gmv/17971022

International Nannoplankton Association
07/06/2020

International Nannoplankton Association

After the successful completion of the first two Nannotalks, we are now pleased to let you know that the next virtual conference will take place tomorrow, 7th of July. 😄

Speakers:

Jorijntje Henderiks (University of Uppsala) - Small is beautiful (and why cell size matters)

and

Luc Beaufort (Aix-Marseille University) - Orbital cycles, climates, and coccolithophores

Feel free to watch online the talks on YouTube channel 😃(https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzvtI1fp2nAK7p7zBi9Q0UQ?view_as=subscriber)

Time of the Conference: EDT 10:00-11:00 / CEST 16:00-17:00

Geologists' Association
07/03/2020

Geologists' Association

06/30/2020
International Nannoplankton Association

International Nannoplankton Association

We are pleased to announce that during July 6-11, 2020 we will be streaming online seminars on calcareous nannoplankton every day. The International Nannoplankton Association (INA) in collaboration with the Aurora Science Communications want to invite you to be part of the project “Nannotalks”, whose objective is to promote knowledge of this fascinating microscopic group with students near and far, with colleagues in other fields, and with the general public. You can stream the talks live on YouTube.

First conference on July 6th

EST Time (New York) 10:00
CET Time (Central Europe) 16:00
GMT-5 (Colombia) 9:00

Important information:

• Keep your microphone muted!
• Please use the chat feature to ask any questions. Questions will be collected by the moderator and answered after the talk by the speaker.
• Every talk is planned to be ~20 minutes + 10 minutes of discussion.
• Due to the limited time, we encourage you to contact each researcher for unanswered questions.

Follow us on YouTube for more information.

YouTube
https://youtu.be/rJBGRBYZcdE

INA YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPC_IU-B0L3ZO7SNv4gdlZQ/

List of speakers:
http://ina.tmsoc.org/meetings/Nannotalks2020.html

Fossils are often formed by mineral replacement, and can be by various minerals; a few decades ago, a few rare specimens...
05/23/2020

Fossils are often formed by mineral replacement, and can be by various minerals; a few decades ago, a few rare specimens of emerald-replaced gastropod fossils were found by emerald miners in Colombia. Only a handful of these were ever found. Pic by Fabreminerals. @fossillocator (Twitter)

Want to visit the Book Cliffs, Utah from the comfort of your armchair??? Check out V3Geo today!https://v3geo.com/model/2...
05/21/2020

Want to visit the Book Cliffs, Utah from the comfort of your armchair??? Check out V3Geo today!

https://v3geo.com/model/28

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Mount Saint Helen eruption, the picture below shows the resulting lahars of t...
05/20/2020

To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Mount Saint Helen eruption, the picture below shows the resulting lahars of the eruption, clearing as far as 30-60 miles in extent.

These highly viscous density mudflows carry objects such as large boulders and logs, where the high drag and buoyancy forces can clear forests or any man made objects. During the explosion about 3 billion cubic yards of material was deposited, initiating these massive lahars (volcanoes.usgs.gov).

Look at those layers 👀
05/19/2020

Look at those layers 👀

Something quite spectacular to see in Argentina, South America...the hill of seven colors near Jujuy Province.

True at so many levels.
05/18/2020

True at so many levels.

Death Valley National Park has a diverse and complex geologic history. Since its formation, the area that comprises the ...
05/16/2020

Death Valley National Park has a diverse and complex geologic history. Since its formation, the area that comprises the park has experienced at least four major periods of extensive volcanism, three or four periods of major sedimentation, and several intervals of major tectonic deformation where the crust has been reshaped. Two periods of glaciation (a series of ice ages) have also had effects on the area, although no glaciers ever existed in the ranges now in the park.
#geology #science #geologyscienceofficial #usa #deathvalleynationalpark

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38th Annual GCSSEPM Foundation Perkins Rosen Research Conference. December 1–3, 2021
Great talk last night at the ECH Awards Banquet (Engineering, Science, & Technology Council of Houston). Dr. Patricia H. Reiff, Rice University, "Magnetism, MMS, and the Solar Eclipse 2017". Neat link mentioned in her talk: