National Birth Defects Prevention Network

National Birth Defects Prevention Network The NBDPN is a volunteer-based organization that addresses the issues of birth defects surveillance, research and prevention under one umbrella by maintaining a national network of state and population-based birth defects programs.

Members include public health officials, epidemiologists, academics, parents, and others committed to understanding factors that may lead to birth defects, identifying strategies for reducing birth defects, and working to prevent potential secondary disabilities. The NBDPN assesses the impact of birth defects upon children, families, and health care; identifies factors that can be used to develop

Members include public health officials, epidemiologists, academics, parents, and others committed to understanding factors that may lead to birth defects, identifying strategies for reducing birth defects, and working to prevent potential secondary disabilities. The NBDPN assesses the impact of birth defects upon children, families, and health care; identifies factors that can be used to develop

Operating as usual

Remind your family and friends that there’s still time to get their annual flu shot during National Influenza Vaccinatio...
12/09/2021

Remind your family and friends that there’s still time to get their annual flu shot during National Influenza Vaccination Week. Post your photo and share why you got vaccinated, then tag your loved ones to encourage them to do the same! Together, we can Fight Flu.
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

Remind your family and friends that there’s still time to get their annual flu shot during National Influenza Vaccination Week. Post your photo and share why you got vaccinated, then tag your loved ones to encourage them to do the same! Together, we can Fight Flu.
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! This week is another reminder that there is still time to roll your sleeve and...
12/08/2021

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! This week is another reminder that there is still time to roll your sleeve and get your annual flu shot to protect yourself and your loved ones. It’s especially important for people with certain chronic conditions like asthma, heart disease, and diabetes to get vaccinated. Find a vaccination location near you: https://www.vaccines.gov/find-vaccines/
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! This week is another reminder that there is still time to roll your sleeve and get your annual flu shot to protect yourself and your loved ones. It’s especially important for people with certain chronic conditions like asthma, heart disease, and diabetes to get vaccinated. Find a vaccination location near you: https://www.vaccines.gov/find-vaccines/
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

Flu vaccination can reduce the burden of flu illnesses on our medical systems. There’s still time to get vaccinated! Mak...
12/07/2021

Flu vaccination can reduce the burden of flu illnesses on our medical systems. There’s still time to get vaccinated! Make a plan to get vaccinated during National Influenza Vaccination Week. For more information, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/prevention.htm
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

Flu vaccination can reduce the burden of flu illnesses on our medical systems. There’s still time to get vaccinated! Make a plan to get vaccinated during National Influenza Vaccination Week. For more information, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/prevention.htm
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

It’s important for everyone to get a flu vaccine this year — especially people living with certain chronic conditions li...
12/06/2021

It’s important for everyone to get a flu vaccine this year — especially people living with certain chronic conditions like heart disease, asthma or diabetes, who are at higher risk of developing serious flu complications.
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

It’s important for everyone to get a flu vaccine this year — especially people living with certain chronic conditions like heart disease, asthma or diabetes, who are at higher risk of developing serious flu complications.
#NationalInfluenzaVaccinationWeek

During #HandwashingAwarenessWeek, you can prevent the spread of CMV! Cytomegalovirus (pronounced sy-toe-MEG-a-low-vy-rus...
12/04/2021

During #HandwashingAwarenessWeek, you can prevent the spread of CMV! Cytomegalovirus (pronounced sy-toe-MEG-a-low-vy-rus), or CMV, is a virus that infects people of all ages. Over half of adults have been infected with CMV by age 40. Most people infected with CMV show no signs or symptoms. When a baby is born with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, it is called congenital CMV. About one out of every 200 babies is born with congenital CMV infection. About one in five babies with congenital CMV infection will have long-term health problems. For more information about CMV, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/cmv/overview.html
#WashYourHands

During #HandwashingAwarenessWeek, you can prevent the spread of CMV! Cytomegalovirus (pronounced sy-toe-MEG-a-low-vy-rus), or CMV, is a virus that infects people of all ages. Over half of adults have been infected with CMV by age 40. Most people infected with CMV show no signs or symptoms. When a baby is born with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, it is called congenital CMV. About one out of every 200 babies is born with congenital CMV infection. About one in five babies with congenital CMV infection will have long-term health problems. For more information about CMV, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/cmv/overview.html
#WashYourHands

Sometimes it's hard to get kids to wash their hands properly. To teach children about the best way to wash your hands, w...
12/04/2021

Sometimes it's hard to get kids to wash their hands properly. To teach children about the best way to wash your hands, watch this video with them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJG72sycQB8 #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

Sometimes it's hard to get kids to wash their hands properly. To teach children about the best way to wash your hands, watch this video with them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qJG72sycQB8 #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

On this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, let us all commit to work together to tackle the obstacles, inju...
12/03/2021

On this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, let us all commit to work together to tackle the obstacles, injustices, and discrimination that persons with disabilities experience. Promoting inclusion for persons with disabilities means recognizing and protecting their rights. This vision will only be achieved through active consultation with persons with disabilities and their representative organizations.
#IDPWD21

On this International Day of Persons with Disabilities, let us all commit to work together to tackle the obstacles, injustices, and discrimination that persons with disabilities experience. Promoting inclusion for persons with disabilities means recognizing and protecting their rights. This vision will only be achieved through active consultation with persons with disabilities and their representative organizations.
#IDPWD21

Why do we celebrate International Day of Persons with Disabilities?The annual observance of the International Day of Dis...
12/03/2021

Why do we celebrate International Day of Persons with Disabilities?

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 47/3. The observance of the Day aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities

Not all disabilities are visible. We must spread awareness and understanding of disabilities that are not immediately apparent, such as mental illness, chronic pain or fatigue, sight or hearing impairments, diabetes, brain injuries, neurological disorders, learning differences and cognitive dysfunctions, among others.

We must also consider how COVID-19 has impacted those who live with disabilities, and that there is opportunity to make changes to have a more supportive and inclusive society.

To learn more, visit: https://idpwd.org/

#IDPWD21

Why do we celebrate International Day of Persons with Disabilities?

The annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons was proclaimed in 1992, by the United Nations General Assembly resolution 47/3. The observance of the Day aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights, and well-being of persons with disabilities

Not all disabilities are visible. We must spread awareness and understanding of disabilities that are not immediately apparent, such as mental illness, chronic pain or fatigue, sight or hearing impairments, diabetes, brain injuries, neurological disorders, learning differences and cognitive dysfunctions, among others.

We must also consider how COVID-19 has impacted those who live with disabilities, and that there is opportunity to make changes to have a more supportive and inclusive society.

To learn more, visit: https://idpwd.org/

#IDPWD21

Some facts about hand washing:• 80% of communicable diseases can be transferred by touch (person-to-person contact).• Wa...
12/03/2021

Some facts about hand washing:
• 80% of communicable diseases can be transferred by touch (person-to-person contact).
• Washing your hands a few times a day can reduce diarrhea rates by 40%.
• Touching your face with dirty hands spreads sicknesses pneumonia, a cold, and the flu.
• Pneumonia is the number one cause of childhood death, and is preventable by regular hand washing.
• The ideal amount of time to wash your hands is 30 seconds, but 15 is recommended at the very least.
• Most bacteria on our hands is under our fingernails, so when you’re washing, be sure to scrub underneath them.
• Damp hands are 1,000 times more likely to spread bacteria than dry hands, yet only 20% of people dry their hands after they wash them.
• Reusable cloth towels have millions of bacteria in their fibers. Using disposable paper towels is the cleanest way to dry your hands.
• Studies show that people who wash their hands have 24% less sick days because of respiratory illness, and 51% fewer sick days due to a sick stomach.
• Make it a point to wash your hands several times a day. #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

Some facts about hand washing:
• 80% of communicable diseases can be transferred by touch (person-to-person contact).
• Washing your hands a few times a day can reduce diarrhea rates by 40%.
• Touching your face with dirty hands spreads sicknesses pneumonia, a cold, and the flu.
• Pneumonia is the number one cause of childhood death, and is preventable by regular hand washing.
• The ideal amount of time to wash your hands is 30 seconds, but 15 is recommended at the very least.
• Most bacteria on our hands is under our fingernails, so when you’re washing, be sure to scrub underneath them.
• Damp hands are 1,000 times more likely to spread bacteria than dry hands, yet only 20% of people dry their hands after they wash them.
• Reusable cloth towels have millions of bacteria in their fibers. Using disposable paper towels is the cleanest way to dry your hands.
• Studies show that people who wash their hands have 24% less sick days because of respiratory illness, and 51% fewer sick days due to a sick stomach.
• Make it a point to wash your hands several times a day. #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

Respiratory syncytial virus, or #RSV, is the leading cause of hospitalization for babies younger than one year old. Hand...
12/02/2021

Respiratory syncytial virus, or #RSV, is the leading cause of hospitalization for babies younger than one year old. Handwashing can reduce the spread of RSV, and protect babies from serious illness.
Learn more about RSV: https://www.infanthealth.org/rsv-1 #HandwashingAwarenessWeek

Respiratory syncytial virus, or #RSV, is the leading cause of hospitalization for babies younger than one year old. Handwashing can reduce the spread of RSV, and protect babies from serious illness.
Learn more about RSV: https://www.infanthealth.org/rsv-1 #HandwashingAwarenessWeek

The best times to wash your hands are before, during and after preparing food, after using the toilet, before and after ...
12/02/2021

The best times to wash your hands are before, during and after preparing food, after using the toilet, before and after caring for someone who is sick and after blowing your nose, sneezing or coughing. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

The best times to wash your hands are before, during and after preparing food, after using the toilet, before and after caring for someone who is sick and after blowing your nose, sneezing or coughing. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. #HandwashingAwarenessWeek #WashYourHands

It's #HandwashingAwarenessWeek! A quick rinse under warm water isn’t enough to get your hands clean. Follow these 5 step...
12/02/2021

It's #HandwashingAwarenessWeek! A quick rinse under warm water isn’t enough to get your hands clean. Follow these 5 steps when you wash your hands.
1. Wet your hands with clean running water.
2. Lather the hands with soap and rub them together.
3. Scrub your hands for 20 seconds.
4. Rinse your hands with clean running water.
5. Dry your hands with a clean towel.
#WashYourHands

It's #HandwashingAwarenessWeek! A quick rinse under warm water isn’t enough to get your hands clean. Follow these 5 steps when you wash your hands.
1. Wet your hands with clean running water.
2. Lather the hands with soap and rub them together.
3. Scrub your hands for 20 seconds.
4. Rinse your hands with clean running water.
5. Dry your hands with a clean towel.
#WashYourHands

REMINDER the webinar is happening tomorrow! Find registration information below.  The National Birth Defects Prevention ...
12/01/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a meeting: Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Clinical Aspects and Implications of Newborn Screening. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the meeting.

REMINDER the webinar is happening tomorrow! Find registration information below.

The National Birth Defects Prevention Network and the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) Newborn Screening Technical assistance and Evaluation Program (NewSTEPs) are pleased to announce a joint webinar on the Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Clinical Aspects and Implications of Newborn Screening on Thursday December 2, 2021 at 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm ET.

Description:
This webinar provides an opportunity to hear from CCHD clinicians and learn from their review of the various detection methodologies and algorithms for CCHD, definitions of CCHD in the public health context and ways to improve CCHD detection and patient outcomes.

Please use this link (https://aphl.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJErcuyhrDsrHdXN-1Dq5eep3907TX-0WHWN) to register in advance for this webinar.

Objectives:
At the conclusion of this webinar, the participant will be able to:

Describe the importance of detecting CCHD
Describe the various methodologies and algorithms of CCHD detection and their limitations
Define CCHD newborn screening in the public health context
Identify strategies for improving CCHD detection and patient outcomes

Speakers:
Gerard Martin, M.D., FAAP, FACC, FAHA, Pediatric Cardiologist, C.R. Beyda Professor of Cardiology, Children’s National Hospital
Matthew Oster, M.D., MPH, Pediatric Cardiologist, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
John Hokanson, M.D. Pediatric Cardiologist, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

This resource is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant # U22MC24078. This information or content and conclusions are those of the authors and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the US Government.

Please contact Sari Edelman at [email protected] if you have any questions regarding this webinar.

Welcome! You are invited to join a meeting: Critical Congenital Heart Disease: Clinical Aspects and Implications of Newborn Screening. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the meeting.

Life can be so overwhelming - so make sure to take some time to care for yourself! 1. Take breaks to relax and unwind th...
11/30/2021

Life can be so overwhelming - so make sure to take some time to care for yourself!

1. Take breaks to relax and unwind through yoga, music, gardening, or new hobbies.
2. Find new ways to safely connect with family and friends, get support, and share feelings.
3. Take care of your body and get moving to lessen fatigue, anxiety, or sadness.
4. Treat yourself to healthy foods and get enough sleep.

To learn more, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/stress-coping/care-for-yourself/index.html

Life can be so overwhelming - so make sure to take some time to care for yourself!

1. Take breaks to relax and unwind through yoga, music, gardening, or new hobbies.
2. Find new ways to safely connect with family and friends, get support, and share feelings.
3. Take care of your body and get moving to lessen fatigue, anxiety, or sadness.
4. Treat yourself to healthy foods and get enough sleep.

To learn more, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/stress-coping/care-for-yourself/index.html

It is natural to feel stress, anxiety, grief, and worry in life, and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning t...
11/27/2021

It is natural to feel stress, anxiety, grief, and worry in life, and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning to cope with these emotions in a healthy way will make you, people you care about, and those around you become more resilient. If you are struggling to cope, there are many ways to get help. Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.

It is natural to feel stress, anxiety, grief, and worry in life, and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning to cope with these emotions in a healthy way will make you, people you care about, and those around you become more resilient. If you are struggling to cope, there are many ways to get help. Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row.

Some babies born too early need to spend time in a hospital's newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Premature babies stay ...
11/26/2021

Some babies born too early need to spend time in a hospital's newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Premature babies stay in the NICU until their organs develop enough to not need medical support. Caring for a baby in the NICU can be scary and confusing, and families need the support of community! To learn about supports and resources for NICU families, visit: https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/the-nicu.aspx #PrematurityAwarenessMonth #ItsNotFine

Some babies born too early need to spend time in a hospital's newborn intensive care unit (NICU). Premature babies stay in the NICU until their organs develop enough to not need medical support. Caring for a baby in the NICU can be scary and confusing, and families need the support of community! To learn about supports and resources for NICU families, visit: https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/the-nicu.aspx #PrematurityAwarenessMonth #ItsNotFine

Address

Houston, TX
77043

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when National Birth Defects Prevention Network posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to National Birth Defects Prevention Network:

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Public & Government Services in Houston

Show All

Comments

This course is an opportunity for all infertility specialists, obstetricians and gynaecologists to enhance their techniques in diagnosis and treatment For more details visit https://bit.ly/2IAtajR
What criteria has your state used for adding/deleting conditions to your registry? Wisconsin criteria. A Birth defect should: • Conform to the statutory definition of a birth defect – a structural deformation, disruption or dysplasia, or a genetic, inherited, or biochemical disease that occurs prior to or at birth. • Usually be identifiable by 2 years of age . • Be a major anomaly (having medical, surgical or developmental significance). • Be of ‘sufficient’ frequency (birth prevalence) – an estimated prevalence of 1/30,000 births.
Hi,I wanted to hear from states if they developed criteria used to determine what birth defects they enter into their registry. Due to statute changes, WI can be more flexiable. Current WI Policy - a birth defect should: • Conform to the statutory definition of a birth defect – a structural deformation, disruption or dysplasia, or a genetic, inherited, or biochemical disease that occurs prior to or at birth. • Usually be identifiable by 2 years of age (the limit of the statute). • Be a major anomaly (having medical, surgical or developmental significance). • Be of ‘sufficient’ frequency (birth prevalence) – an estimated prevalence of 1/30,000 births was selected; this would mean that 2 or more occurrences each year in Wisconsin would be expected, and be consistent as possible with data being collected elsewhere in the country. In addition, the list does not include most conditions identified by current newborn screening since ascertainment of these is virtually complete anyway. Thanks for your responses and help. Please reply to: [email protected] if you have such a policy.
Protect the pregnancies of childcare providers/volunteers: https://www.facebook.com/nationalcmv/posts/986541968166490
For all involved in some aspect of research, here is a newsflash from "Kids First 2.0": The Kids First program would like to share with you a funding opportunity in the area of Birth Defects research supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) #RFA-DD18-001: Birth Defects Study To Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS) II was published/announced on 12/21/2017. If interested in applying, please check the website (https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html) for the full NOFO description and application documents. The opportunity number and link to the NOFO is below as well. Please note this is not an NIH or Kids First program funding opportunity. Opportunity title: Birth Defects Study To Evaluate Pregnancy exposureS (BD-STEPS) II Opportunity number: CDC-2018-FCAST-0118 Link: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=297928
It's CMV awareness month! Could you please post about the most common congenital infection?
Can you sharesome information on congenital CMV since June is CMV Awareness Month?