Jacksonville Onslow Economic Development

Jacksonville Onslow Economic Development Our Vision: JOED provides comprehensive Economic Development leadership to our Onslow community. Jacksonville Onslow Economic Development, Inc.

(JOED), a 501(c)6 non-profit organization founded in January of 1970. The "Committee of 100" is a partnership of investors comprised of Businesses, Individuals and Government, and operates the JOED office located in the Commerce Center.

(JOED), a 501(c)6 non-profit organization founded in January of 1970. The "Committee of 100" is a partnership of investors comprised of Businesses, Individuals and Government, and operates the JOED office located in the Commerce Center.

Operating as usual

L-R: Coastal Carolina Community College Director of Skills, Trades and Computer Training Sabrina Adalin, JOED Executive ...
09/10/2021

L-R: Coastal Carolina Community College Director of Skills, Trades and Computer Training Sabrina Adalin, JOED Executive Director Mark Sutherland, Military & Federal Construction Operation Manager Cees Justin, and James Maides, owner of Green Recycling and Carolina South Builders.

Moving forward with implementation of the DoD’s Skillbridge internship program in Onslow County, JOED facilitated a meeting between Coastal Carolina Community College staff and two local businesses this Wednesday.

Essential construction industry-specific skill objectives were identified for SkillBridge apprentices’ classroom and On-the-Job (OJT) training: construction estimation, surveying, blueprint reading, excavation, confined space entry, preventive maintenance, class A CDL, diesel/heavy equipment mechanics and maintenance, OSHA 30-hour, safety protocols and 1st Aid/CPR.

“Next steps” include local employers’ registration as industry partners on the DoD SkillBridge website, scheduling classes and instructors, and finalizing OJT locations, equipment and instructional staff.

Both Mr. Justin and Mr. Maides agreed that the combination of education and OJT would produce “work-ready” apprentices, trained in the specific skills their industry demands. They noted that others in this industry would also benefit from the SkillBridge internship program in building their workforce. Another very real benefit is that, with good-paying jobs, we may retain more Transitioning Service Members (TSM) in our community. Finally, the combination of education and training will prepare TSM SkillBridge apprentices seeking promotions into higher positions.

L-R: Coastal Carolina Community College Director of Skills, Trades and Computer Training Sabrina Adalin, JOED Executive Director Mark Sutherland, Military & Federal Construction Operation Manager Cees Justin, and James Maides, owner of Green Recycling and Carolina South Builders.

Moving forward with implementation of the DoD’s Skillbridge internship program in Onslow County, JOED facilitated a meeting between Coastal Carolina Community College staff and two local businesses this Wednesday.

Essential construction industry-specific skill objectives were identified for SkillBridge apprentices’ classroom and On-the-Job (OJT) training: construction estimation, surveying, blueprint reading, excavation, confined space entry, preventive maintenance, class A CDL, diesel/heavy equipment mechanics and maintenance, OSHA 30-hour, safety protocols and 1st Aid/CPR.

“Next steps” include local employers’ registration as industry partners on the DoD SkillBridge website, scheduling classes and instructors, and finalizing OJT locations, equipment and instructional staff.

Both Mr. Justin and Mr. Maides agreed that the combination of education and OJT would produce “work-ready” apprentices, trained in the specific skills their industry demands. They noted that others in this industry would also benefit from the SkillBridge internship program in building their workforce. Another very real benefit is that, with good-paying jobs, we may retain more Transitioning Service Members (TSM) in our community. Finally, the combination of education and training will prepare TSM SkillBridge apprentices seeking promotions into higher positions.

This morning, JOED joined the Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Committee as they begin th...
09/10/2021

This morning, JOED joined the Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Committee as they begin the process of defining their region’s current economic development assets and marketing opportunities. Many questions emerged from the broad conversation: since we know our region will continue to grow, how do we best prepare for it? What demographic trends do we see—in our population and workforce? How will transportation plans and infrastructure developments affect our communities and businesses?

The answers may be revealed in the myriad data sets that each organization collects. The group will reconvene next month with data in hand to begin the analysis process that will cover issues of workforce, education and government services, land use, resilience, infrastructure, transportation, and housing.

Consistent with our JOED’s vision “to provide comprehensive economic development leadership to our Onslow community” we are pleased to be a part of the team and look forward to supporting Chairman Scott Franko and the Committee’s work in every way possible.

This morning, JOED joined the Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Committee as they begin the process of defining their region’s current economic development assets and marketing opportunities. Many questions emerged from the broad conversation: since we know our region will continue to grow, how do we best prepare for it? What demographic trends do we see—in our population and workforce? How will transportation plans and infrastructure developments affect our communities and businesses?

The answers may be revealed in the myriad data sets that each organization collects. The group will reconvene next month with data in hand to begin the analysis process that will cover issues of workforce, education and government services, land use, resilience, infrastructure, transportation, and housing.

Consistent with our JOED’s vision “to provide comprehensive economic development leadership to our Onslow community” we are pleased to be a part of the team and look forward to supporting Chairman Scott Franko and the Committee’s work in every way possible.

Congratulations to Mine Safety Appliances on the Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting for an $11.5 million investment into m...
09/10/2021

Congratulations to Mine Safety Appliances on the Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting for an $11.5 million investment into modernizing the existing plant and the construction of its new 85,000 square foot Jacksonville warehousing facility!

This Wednesday MSA was joined by the local community for a Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting ceremony in its new state of the art warehousing facility. In 1979, Mine Safety Appliance considered Jacksonville due to its location and workforce. MSA has been one of Onslow County’s longest serving employers, currently employing over 150 employee associates. The Jacksonville MSA facility produces respiratory and fall protection products as well as MSA Cairns fire helmets. A famous photo taken at Ground Zero after 9/11 shows President George W. Bush with a fireman wearing an MSA Cairns fire helmet and respirator manufactured in the Jacksonville, NC facility.

The event’s attendees included employees (some of whom have been employed there since the facility opened), corporate officials, and an address by Kenny Flowers, NC Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Rural Development.

Speaking on behalf of Governor Roy Cooper and Commerce Secretary Machelle Baker Sanders, Mr. Flowers congratulated MSA on 42 years in Jacksonville and recognized the importance of their investment in rural North Carolina. He emphasized the necessity of relationships in rural areas in creating long-term economic development impacts. North Carolina is the top manufacturing state in the US, and investments like these will continue to grow our region.

MSA has a remarkable history: John T. Ryan Sr. and George H. Deike were horrified by a 1912 mine explosion in West Virginia, that killed 80 miners. Two years later, after enlisting the help of Thomas Edison, the men had designed safety lamps that would decrease fatalities from mine explosions by 75% over the next 25 years. Living up to its name, The Safety Company, MSA expanded its product lines over the years to meet the changing needs of industry. Thirteen product categories serve these industries: construction, fire service, general industry, mining, oil and gas, utilities, government, and healthcare.

The COVID pandemic created opportunities for MSA to advocate for protecting the nation’s supplies of personal protection equipment. Stephanie L. Sciullo, MSA’s Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, Corporate Social Responsibility & Public Affairs outlined the company’s recent efforts:

“We are one of several American manufacturing companies that make reusable, elastomeric respirators. This type of respirator is certified by NIOSH, recommended by the CDC, and currently authorized by the FDA for use against COVID-19 in healthcare settings. Last year, we advocated for this class of respirators to be included in the Strategic National Stockpile. Research shows they are cost effective and durable for long term stockpiling, and they offer a hedge against unexpected supply chain shortages. Working alongside N95s, reusable respirators will play an important role in strengthening the nation’s future emergency preparedness.”

She added that the respirators made at MSA Jacksonville last year helped numerous healthcare workers avoid concerns about not having enough respiratory protection equipment, and that this effort created and sustained jobs in Onslow County. Sam King, MSA Jacksonville’s Production Manager noted the hard work and dedication of MSA’s production associates throughout the pandemic.

Congratulations to Mine Safety Appliances on the Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting for an $11.5 million investment into modernizing the existing plant and the construction of its new 85,000 square foot Jacksonville warehousing facility!

This Wednesday MSA was joined by the local community for a Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting ceremony in its new state of the art warehousing facility. In 1979, Mine Safety Appliance considered Jacksonville due to its location and workforce. MSA has been one of Onslow County’s longest serving employers, currently employing over 150 employee associates. The Jacksonville MSA facility produces respiratory and fall protection products as well as MSA Cairns fire helmets. A famous photo taken at Ground Zero after 9/11 shows President George W. Bush with a fireman wearing an MSA Cairns fire helmet and respirator manufactured in the Jacksonville, NC facility.

The event’s attendees included employees (some of whom have been employed there since the facility opened), corporate officials, and an address by Kenny Flowers, NC Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Rural Development.

Speaking on behalf of Governor Roy Cooper and Commerce Secretary Machelle Baker Sanders, Mr. Flowers congratulated MSA on 42 years in Jacksonville and recognized the importance of their investment in rural North Carolina. He emphasized the necessity of relationships in rural areas in creating long-term economic development impacts. North Carolina is the top manufacturing state in the US, and investments like these will continue to grow our region.

MSA has a remarkable history: John T. Ryan Sr. and George H. Deike were horrified by a 1912 mine explosion in West Virginia, that killed 80 miners. Two years later, after enlisting the help of Thomas Edison, the men had designed safety lamps that would decrease fatalities from mine explosions by 75% over the next 25 years. Living up to its name, The Safety Company, MSA expanded its product lines over the years to meet the changing needs of industry. Thirteen product categories serve these industries: construction, fire service, general industry, mining, oil and gas, utilities, government, and healthcare.

The COVID pandemic created opportunities for MSA to advocate for protecting the nation’s supplies of personal protection equipment. Stephanie L. Sciullo, MSA’s Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, Corporate Social Responsibility & Public Affairs outlined the company’s recent efforts:

“We are one of several American manufacturing companies that make reusable, elastomeric respirators. This type of respirator is certified by NIOSH, recommended by the CDC, and currently authorized by the FDA for use against COVID-19 in healthcare settings. Last year, we advocated for this class of respirators to be included in the Strategic National Stockpile. Research shows they are cost effective and durable for long term stockpiling, and they offer a hedge against unexpected supply chain shortages. Working alongside N95s, reusable respirators will play an important role in strengthening the nation’s future emergency preparedness.”

She added that the respirators made at MSA Jacksonville last year helped numerous healthcare workers avoid concerns about not having enough respiratory protection equipment, and that this effort created and sustained jobs in Onslow County. Sam King, MSA Jacksonville’s Production Manager noted the hard work and dedication of MSA’s production associates throughout the pandemic.

JOED recently visited with Phil Prescott, Business Services Representative for Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Bo...
09/02/2021

JOED recently visited with Phil Prescott, Business Services Representative for Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board (ECWDB) about the challenge businesses face in filling their workforce. ECWDB serves as the designated administrative/fiscal agent for the Federal and State workforce development funds appropriated by the North Carolina Department of Commerce to operate employment and training services in a nine-county region. Those nine counties include Duplin, Craven, Carteret, Greene, Jones, Lenoir, Onslow, Pamlico, and Wayne.

Mr. Prescott told us, “We have been experiencing a decline in our region's number of available workers since the early 2000s. Many factors are contributing to this decline. Our in-migration, while positive, is primarily comprised of retirees. The birth rates for our region barely maintain the population numbers. Small family farms where work ethic, hands-on skills, and most importantly, soft skills were taught have been consumed by corporations. As a result, the workforce lacks skills taught in the to***co patch, potato fields, and the willingness to perform manual labor”

He also noted the most compelling generational change—technology. “Today's workforce has more technology in their hand than was used to guide the Apollo Mission to the Moon. They are more connected and tech-savvy than their parents. This electronic obsession becomes a barrier for some young people and conflicts with a lot of workplace rules. It creates a chasm between today's talent and business. Workplace policies designed to give HR Managers flexibility to engage with those individuals would be an advantage. High turnover rates expose the inability of the employer to match talent with their jobs effectively. Maintaining an excellent corporate image in their community is essential to recruitment in a competitive environment."

Mr. Prescott advises, “Understanding the underlying issues of the turnover rate in operations is necessary. Those could include: ‘are you going to lose benefits if you keep working?’ It may make sense from a childcare need, income, and other government services for that individual to work fewer hours. It is hard for a production manager to send people home when they are short-staffed, but sometimes a different scheduling strategy might work for the individual and allow them to continue to work.”

Addressing future workforce impacts, Mr. Prescott told us, “The outsourcing and exporting of manufacturing jobs created a void between entry-level employment and jobs that could sustain a family. Our state marketing efforts have focused on the Travel and Tourism industry sectors versus the blue-collar industries. It appears that there is a shift in that strategy, and there is a greater focus on the manufacturing and technology industries. Training for the existing workforce is critical. We need to increase our partnership with the economic development community, so there is a clear understanding of the skillsets required to fill the jobs that will be available. That is why we appreciate our partnership with JOED. It is imperative that JOED and the ECWDB continue to collaborate on solutions to challenges of the shifting workforce and industry landscape.”

JOED recently visited with Phil Prescott, Business Services Representative for Eastern Carolina Workforce Development Board (ECWDB) about the challenge businesses face in filling their workforce. ECWDB serves as the designated administrative/fiscal agent for the Federal and State workforce development funds appropriated by the North Carolina Department of Commerce to operate employment and training services in a nine-county region. Those nine counties include Duplin, Craven, Carteret, Greene, Jones, Lenoir, Onslow, Pamlico, and Wayne.

Mr. Prescott told us, “We have been experiencing a decline in our region's number of available workers since the early 2000s. Many factors are contributing to this decline. Our in-migration, while positive, is primarily comprised of retirees. The birth rates for our region barely maintain the population numbers. Small family farms where work ethic, hands-on skills, and most importantly, soft skills were taught have been consumed by corporations. As a result, the workforce lacks skills taught in the to***co patch, potato fields, and the willingness to perform manual labor”

He also noted the most compelling generational change—technology. “Today's workforce has more technology in their hand than was used to guide the Apollo Mission to the Moon. They are more connected and tech-savvy than their parents. This electronic obsession becomes a barrier for some young people and conflicts with a lot of workplace rules. It creates a chasm between today's talent and business. Workplace policies designed to give HR Managers flexibility to engage with those individuals would be an advantage. High turnover rates expose the inability of the employer to match talent with their jobs effectively. Maintaining an excellent corporate image in their community is essential to recruitment in a competitive environment."

Mr. Prescott advises, “Understanding the underlying issues of the turnover rate in operations is necessary. Those could include: ‘are you going to lose benefits if you keep working?’ It may make sense from a childcare need, income, and other government services for that individual to work fewer hours. It is hard for a production manager to send people home when they are short-staffed, but sometimes a different scheduling strategy might work for the individual and allow them to continue to work.”

Addressing future workforce impacts, Mr. Prescott told us, “The outsourcing and exporting of manufacturing jobs created a void between entry-level employment and jobs that could sustain a family. Our state marketing efforts have focused on the Travel and Tourism industry sectors versus the blue-collar industries. It appears that there is a shift in that strategy, and there is a greater focus on the manufacturing and technology industries. Training for the existing workforce is critical. We need to increase our partnership with the economic development community, so there is a clear understanding of the skillsets required to fill the jobs that will be available. That is why we appreciate our partnership with JOED. It is imperative that JOED and the ECWDB continue to collaborate on solutions to challenges of the shifting workforce and industry landscape.”

Address

1099 Gum Branch Road
Jacksonville, NC
28540

General information

Our Services 1. Confidential site selection and relocation assistance for prospective industry 2. Client specific demographic and community research 3. Building/land inventory with professional site visits 4. Comprehensive introduction to the Onslow County community 5. On-going assistance and support for existing businesses and industry 6. Established network of individuals, business, government, and civic leaders fostering economic development

Opening Hours

Monday 8:30am - 5:30pm
Tuesday 8:30am - 5:30pm
Wednesday 8:30am - 5:30pm
Thursday 8:30am - 5:30pm
Friday 8:30am - 5:30pm

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