Master Gardeners of Loudoun County, Virginia

Master Gardeners of Loudoun County, Virginia We are Virginia Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners, assisting the homeowner community with unbiased, research-based horticultural information.
Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, genetic information, marital, family, or veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg.
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Consider helping the native and solitary bees, such as the Orchard Mason Bee with a "bee house"."Bee houses (or bee hote...
03/11/2020
Bee Houses for Native Solitary Bees

Consider helping the native and solitary bees, such as the Orchard Mason Bee with a "bee house".

"Bee houses (or bee hotels) are similar to bird houses, but instead of attracting birds, they attract native solitary bee species. Unlike honey bees, these solitary bees are extremely docile and up to three times more effective as pollinators. No, you won’t get any honey, but you will enjoy better flowers, thriving plants, and healthier vegetables in your garden!"

https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/ENTO/ENTO-151/ENTO-151-pdf.pdf
https://www.almanac.com/content/bee-houses-solitary-bees

Learn how to maintain a backyard bee house for native, solitary bees—like mason bees—which can improve your garden's crop and flower yields significantly.

03/10/2020
Virginia Cooperative Extension

Virginia Cooperative Extension

Washing your hands is the best way to prevent the #coronavirus. Here's how to do it properly.
#COVID19 #coronavirusoutbreak #2019nCoV

Curious what a cold snap could do to those flowering spring bulbs that are already emerging?  "Injury to flower buds or ...
03/05/2020
Frost and Cold Injury - Annuals, Bulbs, Groundcovers, Perennials, and Vines | University of Maryland Extension

Curious what a cold snap could do to those flowering spring bulbs that are already emerging?

"Injury to flower buds or blossoms during the late winter or early spring season can be from frost or freeze injury. Late spring frost kills young buds and tender new growth in early spring resulting in fewer flowers and later leaf development. Diagnosis is easy because frozen tissue turns blackish brown. Blasted or damaged blooms result from freezing of flower buds in early spring before or during flowering. Although the flower display for the year may be damaged by freezing temperatures, there is no long-term damage to the plant."

https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/426/426-201/426-201_pdf.pdf

https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/frost-and-cold-injury-annuals-bulbs-groundcovers-perennials-and-vines

Loudoun vegetable gardeners, here is a guide on what you can plant this month!
03/05/2020

Loudoun vegetable gardeners, here is a guide on what you can plant this month!

Calling all vegetable gardeners: it's time to get back out there! All of Virginia's USDA zones can begin planting in March!

🍅 For more detailed information (including exact dates) according to your USDA zone, check our planting guide. If you start seeds for vegetables like tomatoes or peppers indoors, be sure to check your recommended transplant dates so you can start your seeds in advance.

🍅 Virginia’s Home Garden Vegetable Planting Guide: https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-331/426-331.html

CHART TEXT:
What to plant in February:
*=transplant

Zone 6a:
Collards, kale
Mustard
Onion (bulbing)
Peas, Garden
Radish
Spinach

Zone 6b:
Asparagus
Beets
broccoli*
cabbage*
Carrots
cauliflower*
Chard,Swiss
Collards, Kale
Kohlrabi
lettuce, head*
Lettuce, Baby Salad
Mustard
Onion, Bulbing
Peas, Garden
Potatoes
Radish
Spinach
Turnips

Zone 7a:
Asparagus
Beets
broccoli*
cabbage*
Carrots
cauliflower*
Chard,Swiss
Collards, Kale
Kohlrabi
leeks*
lettuce, head*
Lettuce, Baby Salad
Mustard
Onion, Bulbing
Peas, Garden
Potatoes
Radish
Spinach
Turnips

Zone 7b:
Asparagus
Beets
broccoli*
cabbage*
Carrots
cauliflower*
Chard,Swiss
Collards, Kale
Kohlrabi
leeks*
lettuce, head*
Lettuce, Baby Salad
Mustard
Onion, Bulbing
Peas, Garden
Potatoes
Radish
Spinach
Turnips

Zone 8a:
Asparagus
Beets
broccoli*
cabbage*
Carrots
cauliflower*
Chard,Swiss
Collards, Kale
Kohlrabi
leeks*
lettuce, head*
Lettuce, Baby Salad
Mustard
Onion, Bulbing
Peas, Garden
Potatoes
Radish
Spinach
tomatoes*
Turnips

We have spotted these beauties, have you?
02/23/2020
Snowdrops

We have spotted these beauties, have you?

Snowdrops are one of the first flowers to emerge in late winter. Learn more about the origin and care of this popular bulb.

Virginia Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Program
02/17/2020

Virginia Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Program

This Thursday, 10 am! Join the state office for a webinar on school gardening featuring Virginia Cooperative Extension agent Andrea Davis! Andrea will talk about best practices and practical tips for running school garden programs.

➡️Pre Register here: https://virginiatech.zoom.us/meeting/register/vpMocempqTouSiHjlX6YYjhXSiP2Khtr3Q

"you and I are nature’s best hope. Our actions count, and they add up to counteract a fragmented landscape and other cha...
02/15/2020
how conservation starts in your yard: doug tallamy on 'nature's best hope' - A Way To Garden

"you and I are nature’s best hope. Our actions count, and they add up to counteract a fragmented landscape and other challenges to the survival of so many critically important native creatures and the greater environment we all share"

‘NATURE’S BEST HOPE’ is the title of University of Delaware professor Doug Tallamy’s new book, and the subtitle reads like [read more…]

Are you ready for spring 🌼🌿🍅?Get a jump on your gardening by starting seeds indoors.https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-...
02/11/2020

Are you ready for spring 🌼🌿🍅?

Get a jump on your gardening by starting seeds indoors.
https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/426/426-316/426-316.html

"Starting seeds indoors is about as much fun as a food gardener can have in late winter! The idea is to grow baby plants (a.k.a. transplants or starts) for 2-8 weeks (depending on the vegetable and rate of plant growth) and then plant outdoors where the crops will mature and be harvested."

http://ow.ly/GDp850xUkAE

Registration is now open for our 11th Annual Garden Symposium!  Click link to register:
02/01/2020
Annual Gardening Symposium — Loudoun County Master Gardeners

Registration is now open for our 11th Annual Garden Symposium! Click link to register:

Ginger Woolrich, Landscape architect, garden consultant, and writer. Woody Natives: Making Quick, and Confident Decisions Woolridge is co-author with Tony Dove of Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for the Eastern United States: The Guide to Creating a Sustainable Landscape, published in 2018.  Thi...

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Dennis Dimick – retired journalist and photography editor with the Nat...
01/27/2020

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Dennis Dimick – retired journalist and photography editor with the National Geographic. With a focus on the collision between human aspiration and the planet, his National Geographic work included orchestrating major magazine projects on energy, climate change, soil conservation, global freshwater, world population, and the future of food security. Dimick lectures on the emerging Human Age or Anthropocene epoch. http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/events/annual-symposium/

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Sam Droege – wildlife biologist at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Cent...
01/21/2020

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Sam Droege – wildlife biologist at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, part of the US Geological Survey. He is widely published in journals and has been the editor of numerous government publications on birds and insects. His work cataloging and photographing bees has been featured by NPR, The Weather Channel, and the National Wildlife Federation, as well as in numerous publications including Wired, the Wall Street Journal, and Popular Science.http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/events/annual-symposium/

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Ira Wallace – a seed saver, an educator, and the essential intellectua...
01/16/2020

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight: Ira Wallace – a seed saver, an educator, and the essential intellectual and physical energy behind Southern Exposure Seed Exchange—one of the country’s best known and most respected sources for heirloom and open-pollinated seeds organic seeds. Wallace serves on the boards of the Organic Seed Alliance, the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association and the Virginia Association for Biological Farming. She also writes about heirloom vegetables and seed saving for magazines and blogs including Mother Earth News, and Fine Gardening. http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/events/annual-symposium/

Immense focus has been devoted on increasing the Monarch butterfly host plant, milkweed.  Milkweed, anything in the Ascl...
01/15/2020
New study: nectar plants more important than milkweed for Monarch butterfly migration

Immense focus has been devoted on increasing the Monarch butterfly host plant, milkweed. Milkweed, anything in the Asclepias family, is necessary in the early stages of the migration when the Monarchs are reproductive. But what about later in the game, when Monarchs are NOT reproductive? They require nectar to fuel their flight. Agrawal and his colleagues suggest that late season nectar plants and perhaps interconnected habitats–ie, pollinator corridors–would make their continuous route south more doable.

It’s not just about the milkweed: new study says nectar plants may be more important in helping save the Monarch butterfly migration.

Identifying Trees by Their Bark
01/08/2020
Identifying Trees by Their Bark

Identifying Trees by Their Bark

Woody plants can be identified upon close examination of their bark. Variations in color and texture of bark, as well as other characteristics, provide helpful clues to a plant’s identity. Read on …

Loudoun County, let's make 2020 a healthier New Year by bettering our lawn and garden practices to improve the Chesapeak...
01/08/2020

Loudoun County, let's make 2020 a healthier New Year by bettering our lawn and garden practices to improve the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Have questions?
Loudoun County Extension Master Gardeners have a Help Desk located in the Virginia Cooperative Extension Loudoun County Office, 750 Miller Dr. SE, Suite F-3, Leesburg, VA. We are staffed Monday to Friday, March through November, and Monday to Thursday, December through February, between 9 a.m. and noon to take your telephone calls (703.771.5150)

Did you know? The Chesapeake Bay watershed stretches approximately 524 miles from Cooperstown, New York, to Norfolk, Virginia. It includes parts of six states—Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia—and the entire District of Columbia. #NationalTriviaDay

01/07/2020

Annual Garden Symposium March 21, 2020 Spotlight:Ginger Woolridge – a trained landscape architect and garden consultant, Woolridge is co-author with Tony Dove of Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for the Eastern United States: The Guide to Creating a Sustainable Landscape. This authoritative catalog of 85 native species highlights the attributes of native plants and their importance in the food web. The book was praised by Doug Tallamy as “an important new tool to our native plant libraries.”

March 21, 2020.  Save the Date!
12/30/2019

March 21, 2020. Save the Date!

Save the Date!  Garden Symposium March 21,2020
12/16/2019

Save the Date! Garden Symposium March 21,2020

"Years of stress and predisposing factors, coupled with last year’s unusually wet weather, have resulted in sudden brown...
12/14/2019
Is something killing Virginia’s oak trees?

"Years of stress and predisposing factors, coupled with last year’s unusually wet weather, have resulted in sudden browning and death of some Virginia oaks"

For years Adam Downing, a forestry and natural resources agent with Virginia Cooperative Extension, has passed a big, healthy white oak tree on his drive to work. This summer he noticed as two-thirds of the tree’s foliage turned brown in just a few days and the tree looked like it was dying. Withi...

Virginia Cooperative Extension, Loudoun County is proud to announce thirteen new graduates into the Extension Master Gar...
12/13/2019

Virginia Cooperative Extension, Loudoun County is proud to announce thirteen new graduates into the Extension Master Gardener program. Completing the classroom training with over 60 hours of instruction, and the internship of 75 hours all in 2019, the new Master Gardeners stand ready to continue to educate Loudoun on best management practices to keep pollutants from the Chesapeake Bay.

Videos: Solutions to help the environment
12/12/2019
Videos: Solutions to help the environment

Videos: Solutions to help the environment

Virginia Tech strives to address the world’s most difficult problems. Hear from six researchers on their work to solve environment and climate change issues.

Happy World Soil Day!Pick up a soil sample kit at your local extension office or Master Gardener volunteers with the Hea...
12/05/2019

Happy World Soil Day!

Pick up a soil sample kit at your local extension office or Master Gardener volunteers with the Healthy Virginia Lawns program (HVL) can visit your property, complete a site analysis of your yard, measure the area of turfgrass and collect a representative soil sample. The sample is mailed to Virginia Tech where it is tested and a comprehensive analysis produced. Sign up now for Spring 2020!

http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/programs/healthy-virginia-lawns/

Happy World Soil Day!
A friendly reminder that EVERYONE can help make a difference to protect this valuable, natural resource!

Save the Date!  March 21, 2020
12/02/2019

Save the Date! March 21, 2020

Save The Date!  Annual Gardening Symposium March 21, 2020
11/25/2019

Save The Date! Annual Gardening Symposium March 21, 2020

2019 Virginia Farm to Table Conference to be held Dec. 5-6
11/14/2019
2019 Virginia Farm to Table Conference to be held Dec. 5-6

2019 Virginia Farm to Table Conference to be held Dec. 5-6

If you’re interested in local and regional food and agriculture and want to be inspired to implement values that enhance your business, organization, and community, plan to attend the 2019 Virginia Farm to Table Conference.

VCE Northern Shenandoah Valley Agriculture and Natural Resources
11/05/2019

VCE Northern Shenandoah Valley Agriculture and Natural Resources

Spotted Lanternfly has now been found in Clarke County, Virginia. First discovered in Frederick County, Virginia, in 2018, the invasive insect pest has since spread to Winchester, and now Clarke County, Virginia.

We are nearing the end of the 2019 SLF adults. The below freezing night temperatures will kill the adults. Egg masses are the overwintering life stage.

"Keep a keen eye out for egg masses. It is thought that the main way this insect is going to spread large distances is through unintentional human transport. As stated, SLF will lay their eggs on many surfaces other than trees. This could mean firewood, a backyard grill, garden equipment and debris, patio furniture, waste bins, hunting stands and blinds, pallets, and even a car or truck. If you live in or visit an area that is infested with SLF be sure to inspect your vehicle and objects stored outside to prevent unintentional spread. If egg masses are found, scrape them off the surface and destroy them. A stick, credit card, screwdriver, putty or pocket knife, etc. can be used as a scraper. Eggs can be dropped into rubbing alcohol, hand sanitizer, burned, or simply crushed with your shoe. Homeowners are encouraged to inspect their vehicles and cargo for any life stage of SLF before leaving Winchester or Frederick County." (https://www.pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/ENTO/ento-322/ENTO-322.pdf)

More info from on SLF can be found here: https://ext.vt.edu/agriculture/commercial-horticulture/spotted-lanternfly.html

If you find Spotted Lanternfly, please report here: https://ask.extension.org/groups/1981/ask

Northern Shenandoah Valley Master Gardener Association

Address

750 Miller Drive, Ste F-3
Leesburg, VA
20175

General information

Virginia Cooperative Extension is an educational outreach program of Virginia's land grant universities: Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, and a part of the national Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture. Every state has a Cooperative Extension office and now 48 states have a Master Gardener Program. The Master Gardener Program was established to assist the Extension office in meeting the enormous increase in requests from homeowners for horticultural information and advice.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 12:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 12:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 12:00
Thursday 09:00 - 12:00
Friday 09:00 - 12:00

Telephone

(703) 771-5150

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