Rockbridge Report: In-Depth Edition

Rockbridge Report: In-Depth Edition We are a team of four Washington and Lee University journalism students investigating "pink-collar crime" in the Rockbridge area. Pink-collar crime, or female embezzlement, has been on the rise in the past 15 years.

Explore our page to learn more about who these women are, how much money they're stealing, and how their victims are coping. Meet the team:
Hendley Badcock, Happy Carlock, Betsy Cribb and Krysta Huber

06/01/2015

Virginia’s sentencing guidelines for embezzlement don’t consider things like motive. But we think very differently about a woman who takes $500 out of greed and a woman who takes $5,000 because she has a sick child, Washington and Lee University Law School Dean Nora Demleitner says. http://ow.ly/NfnOR

05/30/2015
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Marilyn Dudley embezzled more than $157,000 from Collierstown Presbyterian Church last year. Find out how the church is bolstering its bookkeeping methods and working toward forgiveness. http://ow.ly/NfoTw

05/30/2015

“You often times have full confessions,” Lexington attorney David Natkin says about female embezzlement crimes. Find out how many cases the Rockbridge Area has seen in the last 10 years and what charges these women are facing.
http://ow.ly/Nfojp

05/30/2015

Ensuring embezzlers pay back what they stole is one of the biggest issues surrounding the crime. If the offender is unable to pay, there isn’t much that can be done, Washington and Lee University Law School Dean Nora Demleitner says.
http://ow.ly/Nfo1f

05/30/2015

Embezzlement sentencing guidelines can be misleading, Staunton Commonwealth’s Attorney Ray Robertson says. Yet judges often stick to them. Here’s why: http://ow.ly/Nfnt1

05/30/2015

No business owner ever expects to become the victim of embezzlement. But when that happens, what kind of protection do businesses have? And how can people make sure that they don’t become victims again? Learn what victims, law enforcement officials and insurance agents have to say about preventive practices here: http://ow.ly/NflFu

05/30/2015

Victims of embezzlement aren’t the only ones who pay for the crime. Special Agent Accountant Susan Jones of the Virginia State Police says investigations into white-collar crimes can cost thousands of dollars. Learn just how much taxpayers are forking over at http://ow.ly/Nfleq

05/30/2015
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In less than a six-year period, Will Harris, owner and president of North Fork Lumber in Goshen, Va., lost more than $600,000 to embezzlement. Learn his story and find out how his business recovered at http://ow.ly/Nfk4B

05/30/2015

White-collar crime has gotten a makeover in the Rockbridge area: Local attorney David Natkin says 100 percent of the embezzlement cases he has defended in the last five years in Lexington have been committed by women, known as pink-collar criminals. To learn more about pink-collar crime and its effects in the Rockbridge area, visit: http://ow.ly/Nix6i

05/22/2015

White-collar crime has gotten a makeover in the Rockbridge area: Local attorney David Natkin says 100 percent of the embezzlement cases he has defended in the last five years in Lexington have been committed by women, known as pink-collar criminals. To learn more about pink-collar crime and its effects in the Rockbridge area, stay tuned! Our website goes live in just over a week!

Rockbridge Report: In-Depth Edition
05/20/2015

Rockbridge Report: In-Depth Edition

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Washington And Lee University
Lexington, VA

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Despite numbers dropping due to the safety concerns of playing football, the Rockbridge Area Recreational Organization (RARO) head Darrell Plogger remains confident the youth football program will stay strong. Plogger says in the 28 year history of the program this might be the best year yet. RARO has invested in new equipment and remains committed to providing players with an educational and safe environment. "We basically stress fundamentals and sportsmanship," said Plogger. "We want the kids to have a good experience." Check out the full story here.