Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
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Welcome to the Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities Welcome to the Commission on Disabilities page. We hope that you will find it to be an indispensable resource in meeting your informational needs. As you experience this website, you will find valuable links intended to support you in acquiring the information and assistance you are seeking. After you have had the opportunity to visit our webpage, we hope that you will access the “contact us” feature listed above and provide us with constructive feedback that will enable us to further enhance our webpage. We invite you to learn more about the commission and how you can take part in serving the disability community of Los Angeles County. Thank you for visiting the Commission on Disabilities webpage. ABOUT THE COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES Members of the Commission on Disabilities are appointed by the Board of Supervisors and represent each district for a nonconsecutive two year term. Our mission is to advise the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on a range of issues affecting the lives of people with disabilities and of actions they can take to achieve a barrier free County where people with disabilities have equal access to programs and services. Our commission and committees focus on issues of health, employment, education, transportation, access, and recreation. We also monitor the quality of municipal services, evaluate policy, and recommend improvements to existing laws. We are especially proud of our Tainter Scholarship Program that disperses financial scholarships to graduating high school seniors with disabilities who are pursuing a higher education. Donations to the Tainter Fund are tax deductible and we encourage your participation. The Commission on Disabilities meets every third Wednesday of the month at 1:00 p.m. Meetings are held in room 374-A of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration at 500 West Temple Street in Downtown Los Angeles, California 90012. The public is welcome to attend.

Mission: The Commission on Disabilities meets every third Wednesday of the month at 1:00 p.m. Meetings are held in room 374-A of the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration at 500 West Temple Street in Downtown Los Angeles, California 90012. The public is welcome to attend.

2014 ACCESS AWARDS. Photos by William Kidston Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors andLos Angeles County Commission o...
10/22/2014

2014 ACCESS AWARDS. Photos by William Kidston
Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and
Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
ADA25 Access Awards and Reception
In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25),
the Commission will be honoring those that have promoted equality and accessibility for people with disabilities
Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, 8
th Floor North Balcony
500 West Temple Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012
October is Disability
Awareness Month

2014 ACCESS AWARDS. Photos by William Kidston
Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and
Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
ADA25 Access Awards and Reception
In celebration of the 25th Anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA25),
the Commission will be honoring those that have promoted equality and accessibility for people with disabilities
Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration, 8
th Floor North Balcony
500 West Temple Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012
October is Disability
Awareness Month

Wounded Warrior Project
05/06/2014

Wounded Warrior Project

Photo Friday: Wounded Warrior Project Alumni do some serious sweating during monthly workouts at Under Armour's headquarters in Baltimore, MD.

Challenged Athletes Foundation
02/14/2014

Challenged Athletes Foundation

Celebrating 20 Years That Changed The World!

Since 1994, more than $47 million has been raised and more than 8,200 funding requests from challenged athletes in all 50 states and dozens of countries have been satisfied. Additionally, CAF's outreach efforts reach another 65,000 individuals each year.

For 20 years, CAF has touched thousands of lives, in part by sharing the stories of our history, life-changing events, and the inspirational journeys of the challenged athletes who we support.

Wounded Warrior Project
09/06/2013

Wounded Warrior Project

Photo Friday: Wounded Warrior Project Alumni do some serious sweating during monthly workouts at Under Armour's headquarters in Baltimore, MD.

Judo Coach Willy Cahill Co-Founder of the Blind Judo Foundation Recognized by US Congresswoman...
08/20/2013
Judo Coach Willy Cahill Co-Founder of the Blind Judo Foundation Recognized by US Congresswoman...

Judo Coach Willy Cahill Co-Founder of the Blind Judo Foundation Recognized by US Congresswoman...

Redmond, WA (PRWEB) July 30, 2013 -- US Congresswoman Jackie Speier of California and former student of Coach Cahill entered into the 113th US Congress a Congressional Record recognizing http://www.blindjudofoundation.org [Blind Judo Foundation] CEO and Co-Founder Coach Willy Cahill for his Lifetime...

What is the ADA?
08/19/2013

What is the ADA?

Abilities Expo
08/19/2013

Abilities Expo

President Obama called on the Senate to "Get it done" and ratify the UN Disability Treaty. Do you think we'll get the votes? Click for the story: http://goo.gl/YjLhWK

Special Olympics World Summer Games will hit L.A. in 2015
08/19/2013
Special Olympics World Summer Games will hit L.A. in 2015

Special Olympics World Summer Games will hit L.A. in 2015

The 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games will be the largest sporting event to hit Los Angeles since the 1984 Olympics — a logistical enterprise that seems impossible when you walk into the organizing committee's office downtown.

What is the ADA?
08/14/2013

What is the ADA?

Good news, New England! Auti Angel will lead the dance workshop at the Boston Abilities Expo, September 20-22 at the BCE...
08/14/2013

Good news, New England! Auti Angel will lead the dance workshop at the Boston Abilities Expo, September 20-22 at the BCEC! www.abilitiesexpo.com/boston (Photo by Chariot Mobility Inc.)

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/30/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

http://www.abilitiesexpo.com/losangeles/ Abilities Expo is a CELEBRATION of what you CAN DO
Imagine everything you need, all under one roof! For more than 30 years, Abilities Expo has been the go-to source for the Community of people with disabilities, their families, seniors, veterans and healthcare professionals. Every event opens your eyes to new technologies, new possibilities, new solutions and new opportunities to change your life. Where else can you discover ability-enhancing products and services, play a few adaptive sports, learn new dance moves, attend informative workshops and only scratch the surface of what Abilities Expo has to offer? Register for free today.

"CLICK HERE" http://www.abilitiesexpo.com/losangeles/   Abilities Expo Feb 28-Mar 2, 2014 is a CELEBRATION of what you C...
07/30/2013

"CLICK HERE" http://www.abilitiesexpo.com/losangeles/ Abilities Expo Feb 28-Mar 2, 2014 is a CELEBRATION of what you CAN DO. Imagine everything you need, all under one roof! For more than 30 years, Abilities Expo has been the go-to source for the Community of people with disabilities, their families, seniors, veterans and healthcare professionals. Every event opens your eyes to new technologies, new possibilities, new solutions and new opportunities to change your life. Where else can you discover ability-enhancing products and services, play a few adaptive sports, learn new dance moves, attend informative workshops and only scratch the surface of what Abilities Expo has to offer? Register for free today.

"CLICK HERE" http://www.abilitiesexpo.com/losangeles/ Abilities Expo Feb 28-Mar 2, 2014 is a CELEBRATION of what you CAN DO. Imagine everything you need, all under one roof! For more than 30 years, Abilities Expo has been the go-to source for the Community of people with disabilities, their families, seniors, veterans and healthcare professionals. Every event opens your eyes to new technologies, new possibilities, new solutions and new opportunities to change your life. Where else can you discover ability-enhancing products and services, play a few adaptive sports, learn new dance moves, attend informative workshops and only scratch the surface of what Abilities Expo has to offer? Register for free today.

http://www.losangeles.networkofcare.org/                                        The City and County of Los Angeles welco...
07/30/2013

http://www.losangeles.networkofcare.org/ The City and County of Los Angeles welcome you to the Network of Care Web site. This Web site has services and resources for:
Seniors
Adults with disabilities
Caregivers and
Service providers
This comprehensive, Internet-based resource is for the elderly and people with disabilities, as well as their caregivers and service providers.

"CLICK HERE" http://www.losangeles.networkofcare.org/ The City and County of Los Angeles welcome you to the Network of Care Web site. This Web site has services and resources for:
Seniors
Adults with disabilities
Caregivers and
Service providers
This comprehensive, Internet-based resource is for the elderly and people with disabilities, as well as their caregivers and service providers.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/30/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

http://accessla.org/ http://accessla.org/ Access is the service name of the ADA Complementary Paratransit service for functionally disabled individuals in Los Angeles County.

http://accessla.org/   http://accessla.org/ Access is the service name of the ADA Complementary Paratransit service for ...
07/30/2013

http://accessla.org/ http://accessla.org/ Access is the service name of the ADA Complementary Paratransit service for functionally disabled individuals in Los Angeles County.

http://accessla.org/ Access is the service name of the ADA Complementary Paratransit service for functionally disabled individuals in Los Angeles County. Access transportation service is available for any ADA paratransit eligible individual to any location within ¾ of a mile of any fixed bus operated by the Los Angeles County public fixed route bus operators and within ¾ of a mile around METRO Rail stations during the hours that the systems are operational. Complementary paratransit service is not required to complement commuter rail and commuter bus services, since the ADA does not require that these services provide complementary paratransit service. The service area is divided into service areas and extends into portions of the surrounding counties of San Bernardino, Orange and Ventura that are served by Los Angeles County Fixed-route bus lines.
General Information
Access is a curb-to-curb shared-ride service.
Several riders will be transported at one time in the same vehicle.
It is not cab service, emergency medical or social service transportation, and is not door-to-door or a private transportation service.
Access provides service within ¾ mile of fixed-route bus and rail line in Los Angeles County.
Access operates on the same schedule as most buses. Regular service is offered from 4:00 AM to 12:00 AM, 7 DAYS A WEEK.
As a shared ride service your travel time will be similar to that of a fixed-route bus, not a car or taxi.
Your one-way fare is based on the distance you travel with a maximum fare of $3.25 (except to/from and in Antelope and Santa Clarita Valleys).
IMPORTANT: Access may not be able to transport a wheelchair or mobility device larger than 30” wide and 48” long and weighing more than 600 lbs when occupied.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Commissioner Biographies: Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

CONGRATULATIONS! Commission on Disabilities Scholarship Recipients. Photos by William Kidston.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

"Disable does not mean Unable"

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Janet A. Neal, President, Winslow C. Reitnouer, 1st Vice President, John B, Troost, 2nd Vive President, Wendy Welt Narro, Treasurer, Congratulations.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors (LAC BOS) is the five-member nonpartisan governing board of Los Angeles County, California. Members of the board of supervisors are elected by district. They were as of December 2, 2008: District 1: Gloria Molina District 2: Mark Ridley-Thomas District 3: Zev Yaroslavsky District 4: Don Knabe District 5: Michael D. Antonovich The five-member Board of Supervisors is the governing body of the County of Los Angeles. Created by the state Legislature in 1852, the Board has executive, legislative and quasi-judicial roles. Members are elected by voters in their respective districts and are limited to three four-year terms.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

The regular meetings of the Board of Supervisors are held every Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. in the Board's Hearing Room located at 500 West Temple Street, Room 381B, Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration in Los Angeles. The regular meeting of the Board held on the fourth Tuesday of each month is primarily for the purpose of conducting legally required public hearings on zoning matters, fee increases, special district proceedings, property transactions, etc. On Tuesdays following a Monday holiday the meetings begin at 1:00 p.m.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Los Angeles County, also known as L.A. County, officially the County of Los Angeles, is a county in the U.S. state of California. Los Angeles County was one of the original counties of California, created at the time of statehood in 1850. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the county has a population of 9,818,605, making it the most populous county in the United States. Los Angeles County alone is more populous than 42 individual U.S. states. The county seat is the city of Los Angeles, the largest city in California and the second-largest city in the United States. Los Angeles County also includes two offshore islands, San Clemente Island and Santa Catalina Island. The county is home to 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas. At 4,083 square miles (10,570 km), it is larger than the combined areas of the states of Rhode Island and Delaware. The county is home to over a quarter of all California residents and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the country.

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities
07/26/2013

Los Angeles County Commission on Disabilities

Facts About the Americans with Disabilities Act Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment. The ADA covers employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations. The ADA’s nondiscrimination standards also apply to federal sector employees under section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, and its implementing rules. An individual with a disability is a person who: Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; Has a record of such an impairment; or Is regarded as having such an impairment. A qualified employee or applicant with a disability is an individual who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the job in question. Reasonable accommodation may include, but is not limited to: Making existing facilities used by employees readily accessible to and usable by persons with disabilities. Job restructuring, modifying work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position; Acquiring or modifying equipment or devices, adjusting or modifying examinations, training materials, or policies, and providing qualified readers or interpreters. An employer is required to make a reasonable accommodation to the known disability of a qualified applicant or employee if it would not impose an “undue hardship” on the operation of the employer’s business. Reasonable accommodations are adjustments or modifications provided by an employer to enable people with disabilities to enjoy equal employment opportunities. Accommodations vary depending upon the needs of the individual applicant or employee. Not all people with disabilities (or even all people with the same disability) will require the same accommodation. For example: A deaf applicant may need a sign language interpreter during the job interview. An employee with diabetes may need regularly scheduled breaks during the workday to eat properly and monitor blood sugar and insulin levels. A blind employee may need someone to read information posted on a bulletin board. An employee with cancer may need leave to have radiation or chemotherapy treatments. An employer does not have to provide a reasonable accommodation if it imposes an “undue hardship.” Undue hardship is defined as an action requiring significant difficulty or expense when considered in light of factors such as an employer’s size, financial resources, and the nature and structure of its operation. An employer is not required to lower quality or production standards to make an accommodation; nor is an employer obligated to provide personal use items such as glasses or hearing aids. An employer generally does not have to provide a reasonable accommodation unless an individual with a disability has asked for one. if an employer believes that a medical condition is causing a performance or conduct problem, it may ask the employee how to solve the problem and if the employee needs a reasonable accommodation. Once a reasonable accommodation is requested, the employer and the individual should discuss the individual's needs and identify the appropriate reasonable accommodation. Where more than one accommodation would work, the employer may choose the one that is less costly or that is easier to provide. Title I of the ADA also covers: Medical Examinations and Inquiries Employers may not ask job applicants about the existence, nature, or severity of a disability. Applicants may be asked about their ability to perform specific job functions. A job offer may be conditioned on the results of a medical examination, but only if the examination is required for all entering employees in similar jobs. Medical examinations of employees must be job related and consistent with the employer’s business needs. Medical records are confidential. The basic rule is that with limited exceptions, employers must keep confidential any medical information they learn about an applicant or employee. Information can be confidential even if it contains no medical diagnosis or treatment course and even if it is not generated by a health care professional. For example, an employee’s request for a reasonable accommodation would be considered medical information subject to the ADA’s confidentiality requirements. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Employees and applicants currently engaging in the illegal use of drugs are not covered by the ADA when an employer acts on the basis of such use. Tests for illegal drugs are not subject to the ADA’s restrictions on medical examinations. Employers may hold illegal drug users and alcoholics to the same performance standards as other employees. It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on disability or for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under the ADA. Federal Tax Incentives to Encourage the Employment of People with Disabilities and to Promote the Accessibility of Public Accommodations The Internal Revenue Code includes several provisions aimed at making businesses more accessible to people with disabilities. The following provides general – non-legal – information about three of the most significant tax incentives. (Employers should check with their accountants or tax advisors to determine eligibility for these incentives or visit the Internal Revenue Service's website, www.irs.gov, for more information. Similar state and local tax incentives may be available.) Small Business Tax Credit (Internal Revenue Code Section 44: Disabled Access Credit) Small businesses with either $1,000,000 or less in revenue or 30 or fewer full-time employees may take a tax credit of up to $5,000 annually for the cost of providing reasonable accommodations such as sign language interpreters, readers, materials in alternative format (such as Braille or large print), the purchase of adaptive equipment, the modification of existing equipment, or the removal of architectural barriers. Work Opportunity Tax Credit (Internal Revenue Code Section 51) Employers who hire certain targeted low-income groups, including individuals referred from vocational rehabilitation agencies and individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) may be eligible for an annual tax credit of up to $2,400 for each qualifying employee who works at least 400 hours during the tax year. Additionally, a maximum credit of $1,200 may be available for each qualifying summer youth employee. Architectural/Transportation Tax Deduction (Internal Revenue Code Section 190 Barrier Removal): This annual deduction of up to $15,000 is available to businesses of any size for the costs of removing barriers for people with disabilities, including the following: providing accessible parking spaces, ramps, and curb cuts; providing wheelchair-accessible telephones, water fountains, and restrooms; making walkways at least 48 inches wide; and making entrances accessible.

Address

500 W Temple St, Rm B-50
Los Angeles, CA
90012

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