757th Transportation Battalion (Rail)

757th Transportation Battalion (Rail) 'Home of Army Rail' and the 'Source of Power' HERALDRY

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules (Brick Red), between two bars gemel Or, a pellet fimbriated of the second and surmounted overall by a lion passant guardant of the last.

Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “SOURCE OF POWER” in Black letters. Symbolism
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally used for the Transportation Corps. The double bars simulate railroad tracks, and the black disc simulates a locomotive wheel. Together they represent the organization’s history as a Railway Shop Battalion. The Battalion’s three

Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “SOURCE OF POWER” in Black letters. Symbolism
Brick red and golden yellow are the colors traditionally used for the Transportation Corps. The double bars simulate railroad tracks, and the black disc simulates a locomotive wheel. Together they represent the organization’s history as a Railway Shop Battalion. The Battalion’s three

Operating as usual

USNX 65-00599 United States Navy GE 65-Tonner at Bremerton, WashingtonPhoto by Steve Carter
07/11/2021

USNX 65-00599 United States Navy GE 65-Tonner at Bremerton, Washington

Photo by Steve Carter

USNX 65-00599 United States Navy GE 65-Tonner at Bremerton, Washington

Photo by Steve Carter

USAX 1400 United States Army GP9E at Denver, Colorado by BUFFIEPosted by Kathy Simon
07/11/2021

USAX 1400 United States Army GP9E at Denver, Colorado by BUFFIE

Posted by Kathy Simon

USAX 1400 United States Army GP9E at Denver, Colorado by BUFFIE

Posted by Kathy Simon

US Army 101 is a 2-8-0 steam locomotive that was built for the US Army for use in World War I by Baldwin Locomotive Work...
07/10/2021

US Army 101 is a 2-8-0 steam locomotive that was built for the US Army for use in World War I by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1918 and was under their ownership until it was donated to Korea in 1947.

It was soon discovered that 101 was still property of the Korean Republic. Col. George Simpson, Harold T.I. Shannon, and Harold E. Fuller started talks with the Korean Republic about donating the engine to the National Railroad Museum.

In 1958 Korean Republic President Syngman Rhee donated the locomotive as a gift from the Korean people. On May 30, 1959, General Pershing was presented with a Certificate of Service from the Secretary of the Army.

It is one of only three surviving Pershing Class locomotives, the others being the Southern Pine Lumber Company No. 28(or Texas State Railroad No. 300) and the CFR locomotive No. 140 117 in Romania.

US Army 101 is a 2-8-0 steam locomotive that was built for the US Army for use in World War I by Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1918 and was under their ownership until it was donated to Korea in 1947.

It was soon discovered that 101 was still property of the Korean Republic. Col. George Simpson, Harold T.I. Shannon, and Harold E. Fuller started talks with the Korean Republic about donating the engine to the National Railroad Museum.

In 1958 Korean Republic President Syngman Rhee donated the locomotive as a gift from the Korean people. On May 30, 1959, General Pershing was presented with a Certificate of Service from the Secretary of the Army.

It is one of only three surviving Pershing Class locomotives, the others being the Southern Pine Lumber Company No. 28(or Texas State Railroad No. 300) and the CFR locomotive No. 140 117 in Romania.

USAX 6515 is a three-engine 2,100-horsepower GenSet Road-switcher locomotive built to meet the requirements at Fort Brag...
07/10/2021

USAX 6515 is a three-engine 2,100-horsepower GenSet Road-switcher locomotive built to meet the requirements at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. This U.S. Army locomotive is used to transport wheeled and tracked vehicles and other equipment.

USAX 6515 is a three-engine 2,100-horsepower GenSet Road-switcher locomotive built to meet the requirements at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. This U.S. Army locomotive is used to transport wheeled and tracked vehicles and other equipment.

Heber Valley Railway 1218 spent its final years of military service at the Tooele Army Depot South Area (also known as t...
07/09/2021

Heber Valley Railway 1218 spent its final years of military service at the Tooele Army Depot South Area (also known as the Deseret Chemical Depot) until its retirement in 1993. The Tooele Army Depot South Area was one of the nations largest stockpiles of chemical weapons until 2012 when as the Deseret Chemical Depot the last of the stockpile on site was destroyed. The engine was in active duty in Heber until 2004 when it was stored, having been supplanted by other ex-Army engines such as a MRS-1 and a RS-4-TC.

Posted by Jacob Lyman

Heber Valley Railway 1218 spent its final years of military service at the Tooele Army Depot South Area (also known as the Deseret Chemical Depot) until its retirement in 1993. The Tooele Army Depot South Area was one of the nations largest stockpiles of chemical weapons until 2012 when as the Deseret Chemical Depot the last of the stockpile on site was destroyed. The engine was in active duty in Heber until 2004 when it was stored, having been supplanted by other ex-Army engines such as a MRS-1 and a RS-4-TC.

Posted by Jacob Lyman

07/09/2021

"Our warfighting capability relies upon rail,” said Col. Lillard D. Evans, deputy commander, Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command. “The positive relationships we maintain with our commercial rail partners is key to our success in moving, deploying and sustaining the armed forces to deliver readiness at speed."

Forty-and-eights style boxcar, Fort EustisForty-and-eights (French: Quarante et huit, typically written 40/8 or 40&8) we...
07/09/2021

Forty-and-eights style boxcar, Fort Eustis

Forty-and-eights (French: Quarante et huit, typically written 40/8 or 40&8) were French 4-wheel covered goods wagons designed to hold 40 men or eight horses. Introduced in the 1870s, they were drafted into military service by the French Army in both World Wars. They were also used by the occupying Germans in World War II, followed by the Allies.

Photo by William J. Grimes

Forty-and-eights style boxcar, Fort Eustis

Forty-and-eights (French: Quarante et huit, typically written 40/8 or 40&8) were French 4-wheel covered goods wagons designed to hold 40 men or eight horses. Introduced in the 1870s, they were drafted into military service by the French Army in both World Wars. They were also used by the occupying Germans in World War II, followed by the Allies.

Photo by William J. Grimes

07/09/2021
Marine Corps Logistics Base, Yermo, Calif.
07/09/2021

Marine Corps Logistics Base, Yermo, Calif.

Marine Corps Logistics Base, Yermo, Calif.

United States Army No. 1843 is a Fairbanks-Morse H12-44 locomotive built in 1953. It is a 1,200 horsepower 120 ton yard ...
07/09/2021

United States Army No. 1843 is a Fairbanks-Morse H12-44 locomotive built in 1953. It is a 1,200 horsepower 120 ton yard switcher. Fairbanks-Morse locomotives used an unorthodox opposed-piston design engine. F-M left the locomotive market in 1963 and focused on other areas of its business.

This locomotive was used most recently at the Seneca Army depot in Romulus, N.Y., (near Geneva) where it handled 30 to 100 cars per week on 42 miles of track at the base. In 1993, it was declared surplus by the Army and a group of museum members purchased the unit.

United States Army No. 1843 is a Fairbanks-Morse H12-44 locomotive built in 1953. It is a 1,200 horsepower 120 ton yard switcher. Fairbanks-Morse locomotives used an unorthodox opposed-piston design engine. F-M left the locomotive market in 1963 and focused on other areas of its business.

This locomotive was used most recently at the Seneca Army depot in Romulus, N.Y., (near Geneva) where it handled 30 to 100 cars per week on 42 miles of track at the base. In 1993, it was declared surplus by the Army and a group of museum members purchased the unit.

United States Army locomotive No. 2630 leads a train of WWII-era military vehicles
07/09/2021

United States Army locomotive No. 2630 leads a train of WWII-era military vehicles

United States Army locomotive No. 2630 leads a train of WWII-era military vehicles

Army 235 on the Isle of Wight Steam Railway
07/08/2021

Army 235 on the Isle of Wight Steam Railway

Army 235 on the Isle of Wight Steam Railway

07/08/2021
United States Army FM H12-44 # USA 1846 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky
07/07/2021

United States Army FM H12-44 # USA 1846 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky

United States Army FM H12-44 # USA 1846 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky

U.S. Army locomotive used as part of rail operations - June 2021, Fort McCoy, Wis.Photo By Scott Sturkol
07/07/2021

U.S. Army locomotive used as part of rail operations - June 2021, Fort McCoy, Wis.

Photo By Scott Sturkol

U.S. Army locomotive used as part of rail operations - June 2021, Fort McCoy, Wis.

Photo By Scott Sturkol

07/05/2021
07/05/2021
07/05/2021
07/02/2021

Storms moving through the area didn't slow down this train as 1663 pulls boxcars along the James River Line.

Fifth Army commander Lieutenant General Mark Clark recognized the contributions of the soldier-railroaders in Italy when...
07/02/2021

Fifth Army commander Lieutenant General Mark Clark recognized the contributions of the soldier-railroaders in Italy when he presented them with a plaque in 1944 that read in part: “The services performed by the Allied Force Military Railway Service have contributed materially to the military operation of the Fifth Army.”

Fifth Army commander Lieutenant General Mark Clark recognized the contributions of the soldier-railroaders in Italy when he presented them with a plaque in 1944 that read in part: “The services performed by the Allied Force Military Railway Service have contributed materially to the military operation of the Fifth Army.”

United States Navy65-00631 third (65-00631) [EMD SW1200]- Middletown, NJ - 9/30/2013Eric Kreszl photo
07/02/2021

United States Navy

65-00631 third (65-00631) [EMD SW1200]- Middletown, NJ - 9/30/2013

Eric Kreszl photo

United States Navy

65-00631 third (65-00631) [EMD SW1200]- Middletown, NJ - 9/30/2013

Eric Kreszl photo

Posted by Jonathan Flood, Military Railway Heritage
06/30/2021

Posted by Jonathan Flood, Military Railway Heritage

Posted by Jonathan Flood, Military Railway Heritage

Posted by DS Dan, Switchers and Critters
06/30/2021

Posted by DS Dan, Switchers and Critters

Posted by DS Dan, Switchers and Critters

Rail operations still going strong at Fort McCoy
06/27/2021
Rail operations still going strong at Fort McCoy

Rail operations still going strong at Fort McCoy

Fort McCoy’s rail capabilities remain strong, as highlighted by a recent rail-loading exercise.Soldiers with the 107th Support Maintenance Company (SMC...

B 2044 United States Army ALCO MRS-1 at Providence, Rhode Island by EDWARD J. OZOG
06/24/2021

B 2044 United States Army ALCO MRS-1 at Providence, Rhode Island by EDWARD J. OZOG

B 2044 United States Army ALCO MRS-1 at Providence, Rhode Island by EDWARD J. OZOG

This multi-gauge road switcher trained military railroad personnel, served on frozen Canadian tundra and hot western des...
06/23/2021

This multi-gauge road switcher trained military railroad personnel, served on frozen Canadian tundra and hot western deserts, and was painted in four different paint schemes — all of them black! Built by Electro-Motive Division of GM, LaGrange, IL; March 1952

This six-axle MRS-1 (Military Road Switcher) was built for the Army Transportation Corps during the Korean War with multi-gauge trucks (56 1/2″, 60″,63″,66″) for possible wartime use in the Soviet Union, with its wide-gauge railways. EMD built 13 MRS-1 units (the museum owns two); ALCo/GE built 83 (the museum owns one). Builder’s #2123 was numbered USA #1820. It weighs 240,000 lbs. (120 tons), is 57′ 5″ long over coupler faces, 9′ 8″ wide, and 13′ 6″ high. It has 40″ wheels in a C-C arrangement, and a peaked long hood and cab roof for low clearance operation. It’s powered by a 16-cylinder 567B engine with 1,600 hp at 800 rpm; has D27 traction motors on all six axles; D12 generators; 60:17 gear ratio; tractive effort of about 72,000 lbs. at 30% adhesion; top speed of 77 mph; a 1,200-gallon fuel tank, and is multiple-unit (MU) capable. Many parts are the same as those in EMD’s GP/SD-7s. It was jet black with white lettering and emblems.

After a break-in on the Belt Railway of Chicago, USA #1820 went to Canada for cold-weather evaluation on Canadian National Railway’s Hudson Bay branch from The Pas to Churchill, Manitoba, from November 1952 to April 1953, returning to the BRC. In June 1953 it was sent to the U.S. Army Transportation School at Fort Eustis, Newport News, Va., where it was painted black with yellow trim and white lettering: “United States Army” on its long hood sides, “1820” on its ends and short hood sides, and winged-wheel emblem and “Transportation Corps” on its cabsides. The deck sides later received diagonal yellow and black stripes. About 1962 it ran into a train of coal cars. It was repaired, but still has a ten-foot frame twist. It was repainted in January 1970, with short hood numbers removed, and cabside lettering and emblems replaced by “1820”. In 1971 it was sent to the National Transportation Group, Rail Service Division’s storage site at Hill Air Force Base near Clearfield, Ut. (south of Ogden and under command of the Tooele Army Depot 63 miles southwest). A photo of USA #1820 illustrated EMD MRS-ls in The Second Diesel Spotters Guide in 1973.

In 1981, the museum sought two low-mileage MRS-1 locomotives. Only the EMD type were available, as ALCo/GE units were then classed as “strategic material”. In early 1982, USA #1820 was donated to the PSRMA with some components missing (including brake handles), after release as surplus by the Army Rail Item Manager in St. Louis, Mo.. It cost $500, paid to California’s Surplus Property Department, plus charges to have its journals repacked and air brake tests made. It was taken free of charge with EMD MRS-1 USAF #1809 (also donated) by the UP, Santa Fe, and SD&AE to San Ysidro, Ca., and brought up to Campo in July/August 1983 on the museum’s first “Great Freight”.

USA #1820 was acquired partly to provide parts for the restoration of USAF #1809. Some parts were used for that in 1984, and its cab was nearly removed in 1988. In 1992-93, museum volunteers began restoration of USA #1820 to operating condition.

Repainted in its 1953 scheme of black with yellow trim and white lettering and emblems, USA #1820 will be used as additional and backup power on museum trains.

1993 Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association. W. Schneider

This multi-gauge road switcher trained military railroad personnel, served on frozen Canadian tundra and hot western deserts, and was painted in four different paint schemes — all of them black! Built by Electro-Motive Division of GM, LaGrange, IL; March 1952

This six-axle MRS-1 (Military Road Switcher) was built for the Army Transportation Corps during the Korean War with multi-gauge trucks (56 1/2″, 60″,63″,66″) for possible wartime use in the Soviet Union, with its wide-gauge railways. EMD built 13 MRS-1 units (the museum owns two); ALCo/GE built 83 (the museum owns one). Builder’s #2123 was numbered USA #1820. It weighs 240,000 lbs. (120 tons), is 57′ 5″ long over coupler faces, 9′ 8″ wide, and 13′ 6″ high. It has 40″ wheels in a C-C arrangement, and a peaked long hood and cab roof for low clearance operation. It’s powered by a 16-cylinder 567B engine with 1,600 hp at 800 rpm; has D27 traction motors on all six axles; D12 generators; 60:17 gear ratio; tractive effort of about 72,000 lbs. at 30% adhesion; top speed of 77 mph; a 1,200-gallon fuel tank, and is multiple-unit (MU) capable. Many parts are the same as those in EMD’s GP/SD-7s. It was jet black with white lettering and emblems.

After a break-in on the Belt Railway of Chicago, USA #1820 went to Canada for cold-weather evaluation on Canadian National Railway’s Hudson Bay branch from The Pas to Churchill, Manitoba, from November 1952 to April 1953, returning to the BRC. In June 1953 it was sent to the U.S. Army Transportation School at Fort Eustis, Newport News, Va., where it was painted black with yellow trim and white lettering: “United States Army” on its long hood sides, “1820” on its ends and short hood sides, and winged-wheel emblem and “Transportation Corps” on its cabsides. The deck sides later received diagonal yellow and black stripes. About 1962 it ran into a train of coal cars. It was repaired, but still has a ten-foot frame twist. It was repainted in January 1970, with short hood numbers removed, and cabside lettering and emblems replaced by “1820”. In 1971 it was sent to the National Transportation Group, Rail Service Division’s storage site at Hill Air Force Base near Clearfield, Ut. (south of Ogden and under command of the Tooele Army Depot 63 miles southwest). A photo of USA #1820 illustrated EMD MRS-ls in The Second Diesel Spotters Guide in 1973.

In 1981, the museum sought two low-mileage MRS-1 locomotives. Only the EMD type were available, as ALCo/GE units were then classed as “strategic material”. In early 1982, USA #1820 was donated to the PSRMA with some components missing (including brake handles), after release as surplus by the Army Rail Item Manager in St. Louis, Mo.. It cost $500, paid to California’s Surplus Property Department, plus charges to have its journals repacked and air brake tests made. It was taken free of charge with EMD MRS-1 USAF #1809 (also donated) by the UP, Santa Fe, and SD&AE to San Ysidro, Ca., and brought up to Campo in July/August 1983 on the museum’s first “Great Freight”.

USA #1820 was acquired partly to provide parts for the restoration of USAF #1809. Some parts were used for that in 1984, and its cab was nearly removed in 1988. In 1992-93, museum volunteers began restoration of USA #1820 to operating condition.

Repainted in its 1953 scheme of black with yellow trim and white lettering and emblems, USA #1820 will be used as additional and backup power on museum trains.

1993 Pacific Southwest Railway Museum Association. W. Schneider

06/14/2021
Recently arrived at the Derwent Valley Light Railway, a WW2 veteran built for the War Department in 1942 and shipped out...
06/14/2021

Recently arrived at the Derwent Valley Light Railway, a WW2 veteran built for the War Department in 1942 and shipped out to the British Army Middle East Force for the rest of the war, sold to Shell after WW2 then subsequently to the NYMR where it worked in the Civil Engineering Dept before being stored out of use at New Bridge yard, hopefully see it fully restored soon.

Posted by Paul Scrimshaw

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General information

Lineage Information as of 9 February 2007 Constituted 1 July 1933 in the Organized Reserves as the 664th Engineer Battalion Organized by 1937 in Michigan Redesignated 21 February 1941 as the 757th Engineer Battalion Redesignated 1 April 1942 as the 757th Engineer Railway Shop Battalion Converted and redesignated 16 November 1942 as the 757th Railway Shop Battalion, Transportation Corps Ordered into active military service 3 June 1943 at the Army Service Forces Unit Training Center, New Orleans, Louisiana Inactivated 7 December 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey Redesignated 23 March 1948 as the 757th Transportation Railway Shop Battalion (Organized Reserves redesignated 25 March 1948 as the Organized Reserve Corps; redesignated 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve) Activated 8 April 1948 with Headquarters at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Inactivated 25 October 1951 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Activated 25 August 1952 with Headquarters at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Redesignated 1 January 1955 as the 757th Transportation Battalion Battalion broken up 31 January 1968 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as follows: Headquarters and Headquarters Company as Headquarters, 757th Transportation Battalion (Companies A, B, C, and D as the 1150th, 1151st, 1152d, and 1153d Transportation Companies, respectively--hereafter separate lineages) Reorganized and redesignated 15 March 1972 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 757th Transportation Battalion Inactivated 16 December 1980 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Redesignated 16 May 1985 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 757th Transportation Battalion and activated at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Location changed 1 July 1987 to West Allis, Wisconsin; on 16 September 1993 to Milwaukee, Wisconsin Reorganized and redesignated 16 September 1998 as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 757th Transportation Battalion Location changed 16 September 1993 to Milwaukee, Wisconsin Detachment ordered into active military service 2 January 2003 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin; remainder of battalion ordered into active military service 10 February 2003 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin Battalion (less Detachment) released from active military service 4 June 2003 and reverted to reserve status; Detachment released from active military service 1 November 2003 and reverted to reserve status

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