Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District

Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District Our mission is the surveillance and control of mosquito-borne diseases as well as the abatement of nuisance mosquitoes.

PRESS RELEASEJuly 31, 2020Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District will conduct aerial operations to address persistent...
07/31/2020
Iberia Parish Government, Louisiana

PRESS RELEASE

July 31, 2020

Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District will conduct aerial operations to address persistent mosquito populations Monday (8/3) and Tuesday (8/4) evenings. The District is asking citizens If you must be outdoors --- wear repellent, cover exposed skin and avoid outdoor activity when mosquitoes are most active. Also, remember repellents with 30% DEET or less are labeled for use on children 2 years or older when applied according to instructions and by a parent. If weather conditions are favorable operations will begin near sunset and last approximately one and one-half hours (1.5).

During this period, only hypersensitive individuals or persons that wish to avoid all exposure to chemicals in the designated spray area should refrain from outdoor activities; otherwise, all other citizens can proceed with normal outdoor activities!

Citizens will notice low flying aircraft --- If the aircraft is overhead DO NOT attempt to follow the path of the aircraft. The aircraft is traveling quickly and will be out of the area in a brief period!

Monday (8/3) operations will focus in Laurent / Grand Marais, Rynella, Migues, Lydia, Weeks Island Rd., College Rd., Collins Rd., Cora Ln. and all points in between.

Tuesday (8/4) operations will focus in Jeanerette / St. Joe, specifically Little Valley Rd., Alta Dr., Hubertville Rd., Jeanerette, Linden Rd., E. Hwy 90 and all points in between.

If you have any questions or mosquito-related problems, feel free to contact our office at (337) 365-4933. Please visit us on the web www.iberiaparishgovernment.com and click on “Mosquito Control” --- like us on Facebook for the latest. For more information about West Nile Virus, other mosquito – borne diseases and pesticides for mosquito control please visit www.cdc.gov and www.epa.gov.

Any questions after office hours please contact Herff Jones (337) 380-7140

Louisiana Department of Health
07/02/2020

Louisiana Department of Health

Mosquitoes can transmit several harmful diseases, such as Malaria and Dengue. Here in Louisiana, they can be carriers for West Nile Virus, St. Louis Encephalitis or Chikungunya. At this time, there is no evidence to suggest they can spread COVID-19. Protect yourself and your loved ones by following these helpful tips to prevent mosquito bites: http://ldh.la.gov/index.cfm/page/1930.

REMEMBER!Empty water-holding containers and eliminate other sources of standing water outdoors.Wear light-colored, loose...
06/26/2020

REMEMBER!

Empty water-holding containers and eliminate other sources of standing water outdoors.

Wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing when outdoors in mosquito season.

Use mosquito repellents when outdoors.

Support mosquito control programs.

Myth #5:  Mosquito repellent kills mosquitoes.We in mosquito control vigorously recommend the use of mosquito repellents...
06/26/2020

Myth #5: Mosquito repellent kills mosquitoes.

We in mosquito control vigorously recommend the use of mosquito repellents outdoors. A commonly used repellent is DEET, found in many commercial products in varying concentrations. It works. If used properly, it helps keep mosquitoes off your skin. However, it doesn’t KILL mosquitoes. It simply discourages them.

On the other hand, we in mosquito control do use substances that kill mosquitoes. These are pesticides, not repellents. They are designed to be highly lethal to mosquitoes, while being as harmless as possible to everything else. For example, one of the pesticides we use is called DeltaGard. Its active ingredient, deltamethrin, is a synthetic chemical similar to natural insecticides found in certain plants. Our spray trucks use ultra low volume sprayers to deliver less than one hundredth of an ounce of deltamethrin per acre of land. An acre is equivalent to a square about 200 feet on each side. Think of that for a moment. Less than one hundredth of an ounce of the active ingredient is deposited within a square about 200 feet on each side. That’s how lethal deltamethrin is to mosquitoes.

Because we are able to use so little of a pesticide that specifically targets mosquitoes, we minimize its effects on other wildlife. Our pesticides are designed to break down quickly in the environment. They’re also designed to have low toxicity to humans.

Even though we only spray deltamethrin and other similar pesticides in small amounts, and they break down quickly in the environment, we are still very careful about where we spray. We avoid crawfish ponds and beehives, as well as hypersensitive residents. We want our sprays to kill mosquitoes. We don’t want them to harm anything else.

Myth #4:  All mosquitoes carry disease.As a group, mosquitoes are the most dangerous animals on earth.  Even today they ...
06/25/2020

Myth #4: All mosquitoes carry disease.

As a group, mosquitoes are the most dangerous animals on earth. Even today they are responsible for many thousands of human deaths because of disease transmission. However, most mosquitoes are not disease threats, and most diseases are not transmitted by mosquitoes.

Take COVID-19, for example, the disease that is impacting all our lives so strongly now. It is only natural to wonder if this virus is transmitted by mosquitoes. The good news is that we have no evidence of mosquito transmission for the COVID-19 virus. In fact, coronaviruses in general, like most viruses, do not seem to be transmitted by mosquitoes. In order to be mosquito-transmitted, a virus most be able to make its way from the mosquito’s gut to its salivary gland. Only then can it be injected into the bite site by the mosquito. Most viruses are not able to do this. There are exceptions of course – West Nile, yellow fever, dengue, Zika. These are the viruses that we constantly do battle with in mosquito control.

Most mosquitoes, however, do not transmit these diseases. In Louisiana, our primary West Nile threat is the southern house mosquito. It often feeds on birds, some of which carry this virus. The virus can then make its way from the mosquito’s gut to its salivary gland. The mosquito is now primed to transmit the virus. When it bites a person, the first thing it does is inject saliva. The saliva may contain the virus, transmitting it to the person. In the tropics, the yellow fever mosquito is often the primary threat for transmitting dengue and Zika, as well as yellow fever. The malaria mosquito, on the other hand, transmits – yep, malaria.

The vast majority of mosquito species are mere nuisances, often plaguing us with their bloodthirsty lifeways. Naturally we in mosquito control have to give them our attention. But we also closely monitor the disease-carrying species, targeting them ruthlessly when we see evidence of infection. Medical science will likely come up with a vaccine for COVID-19. However, West Nile fever, a mosquito-borne disease, first arrived in the United States 20 years ago, and there is still no vaccine for this virus. New diseases, some of them mosquito-borne, will continue to crop up over the years. We in mosquito control are always vigilant.

Iberia Parish President's M. Larry Richard's Proclamation for National Mosquito Awareness Week
06/24/2020

Iberia Parish President's M. Larry Richard's Proclamation for National Mosquito Awareness Week

Myth #3:  A mosquito is a mosquito is a mosquito.At first glance, many mosquitoes look and sound much the same to a non-...
06/24/2020

Myth #3: A mosquito is a mosquito is a mosquito.

At first glance, many mosquitoes look and sound much the same to a non-specialist. A skinny body, skinny wings, long spindly legs, and that annoying high-pitched whine in your ear. However, there are more than 3000 different species of mosquitoes on planet earth, with different life histories, activity patterns, and target hosts. There are many mosquitoes that don’t feed on people. There are mosquitoes that feed on earthworms and leeches!

Some mosquitoes are what we call permanent water mosquitoes. They have to have water in which to lay their eggs. The eggs usually float on the surface and hatch quickly. The mosquito wigglers develop in the water, eventually transforming in flying adults. On the other hand there are the so-called floodwater mosquitoes. These mosquitoes CAN’T lay their eggs in the water. The eggs are laid in low swales, dry ditches, and other such sites. The eggs may lie dormant for weeks or even months, waiting for heavy rains to flood these sites. Over time, millions of floodwater mosquito eggs may accumulate on the landscape. When the flood comes, the eggs hatch. The wigglers usually develop quickly. Sometimes their breeding site dries up before they can transform into adults. More often many of them manage to make it to adulthood, and a plague of mosquitoes is underway.

Then there are the co-called container breeders. Many people have heard about tropical mosquitoes that breed in bromeliads. But these are special cases of a more general lifestyle. Many species of mosquitoes breed in tree holes, and almost all of these will take advantage of artificial containers – buckets, bottles, abandoned tires, bird baths. These include some very dangerous mosquitoes, such as the yellow fever mosquito that carries Zika, dengue, and other viruses in addition to yellow fever.

When the Panama Canal was under construction, back in the late 1800’s, many workers contracted yellow fever and were hospitalized. To brighten up the lives of their patients, the hospitals provided flowers, grown in pots. What they didn’t realize is that the yellow fever mosquito, which spread the disease, was breeding in these water-filled containers. They were unintentionally providing breeding sites for the very source of the disease they were combating!

Container-breeding mosquitoes are often right outside our doors. We need to deprive these mosquitoes of places to breed. They cannot breed without water. Outdoor containers that can hold water must be turned over or covered. Bird baths should be emptied at least twice a week. Gutters should be kept clean. Go on a search and destroy mission in your yard. Look for anything that holds water outdoors, no matter how small. Eliminate these mosquito habitats. Fight the bite.

Myth #2:  Mosquitoes can be as big as a half dollar.The largest mosquito in Louisiana is the so-called cannibal mosquito...
06/23/2020

Myth #2: Mosquitoes can be as big as a half dollar.

The largest mosquito in Louisiana is the so-called cannibal mosquito. It’s about the size of a nickel. In fact, it’s one of the largest mosquitoes in the world. Yet many people are under the impression that Louisiana has even bigger mosquitoes, up to the size of a half dollar at least. The confusion comes about largely because of an insect called the crane fly.

Crane flies have a strong resemblance to mosquitoes. They have skinny bodies, skinny wings, and long, spindly legs. But they aren’t mosquitoes, and they don’t bite. The feed on nectar and are quite harmless. Especially in the cooler months, they can appear in large numbers, flying into homes and worrying residents.

All mosquitoes have a proboscis, a long tube that serves as the mouth. This enables them to suck plant juices, and in the case of females, blood. Crane flies have only a pair of finger-like palps on the tips of their snouts, which are normally folded. And of course, any mosquito-like insect larger than a nickel is not a mosquito.

Some people realize that crane flies are not mosquitoes, but make the mistake of believing that they feed on mosquitoes. Unfortunately, this is not true either. They are not predators at all. There are many mosquito predators out there – frogs, fish, spiders, even turtles - but crane flies are not among them.

In Louisiana we like to joke and exaggerate about mosquitoes – their numbers, their size, their rapaciousness. There are plenty of genuine bloodthirsty mosquitoes to deal with. Let’s hope the poor innocent crane fly can catch a break.

National Mosquito Control Awareness Week is upon us again!  Every day this week we will focus on a mosquito myth.  Mosqu...
06/22/2020

National Mosquito Control Awareness Week is upon us again! Every day this week we will focus on a mosquito myth. Mosquitoes impact our lives greatly. It’s important to separate truth from fiction. So here we go!

Myth #1: All mosquitoes bite.
It’s true that the vast majority of mosquito species suck blood. However, many people are unaware that it’s only the FEMALES of these species that bite. Male mosquitoes feed on nectar and other plant juices. The reason female mosquitoes need blood is that they use the proteins in the blood to manufacture their eggs.

Male mosquitoes are easy to distinguish from females. The antennae of females look rather like skinny tree branches with short side branches. The males have feathery antennae that resemble bottle brushes. Of course, without males there would be no new mosquitoes. In that sense the males are just as dangerous as the females
.
There are a few species of mosquitoes that do not bite. An interesting example is the so-called cannibal mosquito, a very large mosquito that breeds in tree holes and containers. Not only is this mosquito not a problem for us, it actually helps us, because in its wiggler stage it feeds on other mosquito wigglers! This mosquito is in fact sometimes used by control agencies as a biological control on other mosquitoes.

It’s nice to have an ally in the mosquito world, and it’s a big, beautiful mosquito as well. The cannibal mosquito is a real gem. Thank you, cannibal mosquito!

These are impacting many parts of south Louisiana.
04/10/2020

These are impacting many parts of south Louisiana.

Black flies are terrible right now in many areas of East Baton Rouge Parish. These tiny flies are daytime biters particularly in late morning. Spraying adults is not an effective control strategy. Not only do the females bite, but they try to crawl in your ears, nose and eyes. Very annoying.

West Baton Rouge Mosquito Control
12/12/2019

West Baton Rouge Mosquito Control

2019 LMCA Education Committee
12/12/2019

2019 LMCA Education Committee

The association is proud to have Dennis carry our mission forward for the years ahead.
11/08/2019

The association is proud to have Dennis carry our mission forward for the years ahead.

Big news for our district! Director Dennis Wallette, has been elected Vice President of the American Mosquito Control Association! This national association has over 1500 members representing more than 50 countries. He will serve one year as Vice-President, one year as President-Elect, and the following year will become President of the association.

Dennis has over 30 years of experience in mosquito control and is in his 17th year as Director of Tangipahoa Parish Mosquito Abatement. He is a Southeastern Louisiana University alumnus and has a Masters degree in Entomology from Louisiana State University.

Congratulations, Dennis! We are proud of your accomplishment and for representing our district and our state!

Louisiana Mosquito Control Association
10/24/2019

Louisiana Mosquito Control Association

Deadlines are fast approaching!

Louisiana Mosquito Control Association
10/24/2019

Louisiana Mosquito Control Association

The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Louisiana Mosquito Control Association will be here before you know it. Check the link below for full information on registration, hotel block, and paper and poster submission.

http://lmca.us/2019-LMCA%20Annual%20Meeting.htm

PRESS RELEASESeptember 26, 2019Mosquito surveillance has indicated a marked increase in floodwater mosquitoes.  The Dist...
09/26/2019
Iberia Parish Government, Louisiana

PRESS RELEASE

September 26, 2019

Mosquito surveillance has indicated a marked increase in floodwater mosquitoes. The District will conduct additional aerial operations Friday (9/27) evening to address these populations. If you must be outdoors --- wear repellent, cover exposed skin and avoid outdoor activity when mosquitoes are most active. Residents throughout the Parish are urged to follow these simple guidelines recommended by the CDC.

Friday (9/27) – operations will target Daspit, Sugar Mill, Sugar Oaks, Vida Shaw, Loreauville and all points in between.

If you have any questions or mosquito-related problems, feel free to contact our office at (337) 365-4933. Like us on Facebook and join us on the web at www.iberiaparishgovernment.com click on “Mosquito Control” for more information.

Questions after hours call Herff Jones at (337) 380-7140.

09/13/2019

The Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District submitted 93 mosquito samples from surveillance traps to The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine LADDL for genetic testing and all samples were reported negative for virus activity. This is encouraging news, but not a signal to relax. The District will continue their hard work. Citizens must wear repellent as the label directs and "Tip & Toss"!

Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District is a sustaining member of the American Mosquito Control Association and takes ...
08/19/2019
World Mosquito Day to Raise Awareness of the Importance of Mosquito Control - American Mosquito Control Association

Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District is a sustaining member of the American Mosquito Control Association and takes great pride in its association with the premier source of scientific information related to mosquitoes and the diseases they carry.

Sacramento, CA. – In honor of World Mosquito Day, observed annually on August 20, the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) is working to increase awareness of the importance of mosquito control and encourages the public to visit the AMCA Web site, www.mosquito.org, for important mosquito i...

Address

611 Old Central Taxiway
New Iberia, LA
70560-2200

Opening Hours

Monday 08:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:30 - 16:30
Thursday 08:30 - 16:30
Friday 08:30 - 16:30

Telephone

(337) 365-4933

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Iberia Parish Mosquito Abatement District posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in New Iberia

Show All