Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial The Offical Homepage for the Civil War Navy's 150th Anniversary Celebration. Visit the Official CWN 150 Blog: www.civilwarnavy150.blogspot.com

This page is intended to provide updated information and discussion on the U.S. Navy. Please visit our official homepage at http://www.history.navy.mil. While this is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. Comments and posts that do not follow t

This page is intended to provide updated information and discussion on the U.S. Navy. Please visit our official homepage at http://www.history.navy.mil. While this is an open forum, it's also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. Comments and posts that do not follow t

06/13/2016
The Future of Civil War History: Chris Kolakowski

Thoughts?

What is the future of Civil War history? On the surface, the question is amusingly phrased, asking for the future of something that has occurred in the past. But below the surface there is a seriou…

The latest and greatest from the recent event at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, by Marcus Robbins.
04/28/2015
"History Matters": The Flag of the CSS Hampton Returns Home

The latest and greatest from the recent event at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum, by Marcus Robbins.

Come--take a mental walk through the past of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Discover a history that predates the United States and supported the establishment of the U.S. Navy. Get to know the people, the skilled tradesmen, who helped build it and discover a place that knows not defeat. Although it has…

Excitement at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum!
04/13/2015

Excitement at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum!

The flag is here! You'll get to see it on exhibit starting on Wednesday evening, April 22, at our After Hours History event. The event is completely free of charge and includes refreshments. It begins at 6pm on April 22, but reservations are required by April 17. Call today! 757-322-3168 or [email protected]
You can read about its capture during the fall of Richmond here: http://hamptonroadsnavalmuseum.blogspot.com/2015/04/150-years-ago-css-hamptons-flag-is.html

Great event upcoming at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum.
03/27/2015

Great event upcoming at the Hampton Roads Naval Museum.

Be the first to see our new CSS Hampton flag exhibit. RSVP today for our next After Hours History event on Wednesday, April 22! The event is completely free of charge and includes refreshments. To RSVP, email [email protected] or call 757-322-3168.

Aboard the sidewheel steamer USS Baltimore, anchored on the James River a century-and-a-half ago, a 33-year naval career...
03/20/2015
Hampton Roads Naval Museum: 150 Years Ago: The Court Martial of William A. Parker

Aboard the sidewheel steamer USS Baltimore, anchored on the James River a century-and-a-half ago, a 33-year naval career hung in the balance. Commander William A. Parker, who had until recently commanded the Fifth Division of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, stood accused of, among other things, "withdrawing from and keeping out of danger to which he should have exposed himself," and "[f]ailing to do his utmost to overtake and capture or destroy a vessel it was his duty to encounter."

Read more about it on the Hampton Roads Naval Museum blog by clicking the link below.

We had so much fun making the cards yesterday for Valentines, we decided to make a few more. Happy Valentines Day from t...
02/14/2015

We had so much fun making the cards yesterday for Valentines, we decided to make a few more. Happy Valentines Day from the CWN 150.

Love is in the air! From the Naval Historical Foundation
02/13/2015

Love is in the air! From the Naval Historical Foundation

February 4, 1865: "The Onondaga I consider a match for the whole rebel fleet . . ."
02/04/2015
February 4, 1865: "The Onondaga I consider a match for the whole rebel fleet . . ."

February 4, 1865: "The Onondaga I consider a match for the whole rebel fleet . . ."

On this day 150 years ago, Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter wrote to Homer C. Blake to commend him for his actions after the Battle Trent's Reach. Porter made it clear that he considered the Onondaga by itself superior to the entire Confederate James River Squadron.CAPE FEAR RIVER, February 4, 1865.

From the Naval Historical Foundation: Bringing you some interesting info very soon about the cultural impact of Robert S...
02/03/2015

From the Naval Historical Foundation: Bringing you some interesting info very soon about the cultural impact of Robert Smalls.

From the Civil War Online: Slamming the Door on the Rebel Fleet.
01/27/2015
January 26, 1865: Slamming the door on the rebel fleet

From the Civil War Online: Slamming the Door on the Rebel Fleet.

On this day 150 years ago, Homer C. Blake, the new commander of the Onondaga and the 5th Division of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, reported on the steps he had taken to ensure that the Confederate James River Squadron would never be able to descend the James River again.U.S.S. ONONDAGA, Ja

The drama between Porter and Butler begins...with no end in sight.
01/02/2015

The drama between Porter and Butler begins...with no end in sight.

Here is some CWN artifact attention from the National Museum of the United States Navy!
12/22/2014

Here is some CWN artifact attention from the National Museum of the United States Navy!

From the Naval Historical Foundation, our CWN 150 partner organization. A little dose of CWN pop culture for your Thursd...
12/18/2014

From the Naval Historical Foundation, our CWN 150 partner organization. A little dose of CWN pop culture for your Thursday morning!

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial's cover photo
12/16/2014

Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial's cover photo

We strive to bring you poignant and meaningful content. Introducing a new social media initiative for the CWN 150: Civil...
12/15/2014

We strive to bring you poignant and meaningful content. Introducing a new social media initiative for the CWN 150: Civil War Navy Vignettes.

Carte de visit of LT J.B. Smith, a naval officer killed aboard USS Congress during the Battle of Hampton Roads. (NHHC Ph...
11/21/2014

Carte de visit of LT J.B. Smith, a naval officer killed aboard USS Congress during the Battle of Hampton Roads. (NHHC Photo Archive)

The newest #NoShaveNavy card comes from the XO of CSS Alabama: CDR John M. Kell! Check them all out here! ow.ly/DGGRQ
11/17/2014

The newest #NoShaveNavy card comes from the XO of CSS Alabama: CDR John M. Kell! Check them all out here! ow.ly/DGGRQ

New #NoShaveNavy card #13 is here from the Naval Historical Foundation. Check it out! ow.ly/DGGRQ
11/13/2014

New #NoShaveNavy card #13 is here from the Naval Historical Foundation. Check it out! ow.ly/DGGRQ

The Naval Historical Foundation is still doing the #NoShaveNavy cards all month - Every card thus far involves the Civil...
11/12/2014

The Naval Historical Foundation is still doing the #NoShaveNavy cards all month - Every card thus far involves the Civil War navies..see them all at ow.ly/DGGRQ

American Civil War Museum
10/27/2014

American Civil War Museum

Read the report of Lieutenant W.B. Cushing, who led a successful assault on the C.S.S. Albemarle on this day in 1864 (pictured in a sketch from the Naval Historical Center).

Albemarle Sound, North Carolina, October, 30, 1864.

SIR:
I have the honor to report that the rebel ironclad Albemarle is at the bottom of the Roanoke River. On the night of the 27th, having prepared my steam launch, I proceeded up toward Plymouth with 13 officers and men, partly volunteers from the squadron.

The distance from the mouth of the river to the ram was about 8 miles, the stream averaging in width some 200 yards, and lined with the enemy's pickets. A mile below the town was the wreck of the Southfield, surrounded by some schooners, and it was understood that a gun was mounted there to command the bend. I therefore took one of the Shamrock's cutters in tow, with orders to cast off and board at that point if we were hailed. Our boat succeeded in passing the pickets, and even the Southfield, within 20 yards, without discovery, and we were not hailed until by the lookouts on the ram. The cutter was then cast off and ordered below, while we made for our enemy under a full head of steam.

The rebels sprung their rattle, rang the bell, and commenced firing, at the same time repeating their hail and seeming much confused.

The light of fire ashore showed me the ironclad made fast to the wharf, with a pen of logs around her about 30 feet from her side.

Passing her closely, we made a complete circle so as to strike her fairly, and went into her bows on. By this time the enemy's fire was fairly severe, but a dose of canister at short range served to moderate their zeal and disturb their aim. Paymaster Swan, of the Otsego, was wounded near me, but how many more I know not. Three bullets struck my clothing, and the air seemed full of them.

In a moment we had struck the logs, just abreast of the quarter port, breasting them in some feet, and our bows resting on them. The torpedo boom was then lowered and by a vigorous pull I succeeded in diving the torpedo under the overhang and exploding it at the same time that the Albemarle's gun was fired. A shot seemed to go crashing through my boat, and a dense mass of water rushed in from the torpedo, filling the launch and completely disabling her.

The enemy then continued his fire at 15 feet range, and demanded our surrender, which I twice refused, ordering the men to save themselves, and removing my own coat and shoes. Springing into the river, I swam, with others, into the middle of the stream, the rebels failing to hit us.

The most of our party were captured, some were drowned, and only one escaped besides myself, and he in another direction. Acting Master's Mate Woodman, of the Commodore Hull, I met in the water half a mile below the town, and assisted him as best I could, but failed to get him ashore.

Completely exhausted, I managed to reach the shore, but was too weak to crawl out of the water until just at daylight, when I managed to creep into the swamp, close to the fort. While hiding a few feet from the path, two of the Albemarle's officers passed, and I judged from their conversation that the ship was destroyed.

Some hours traveling in the swamp served to bring me out well below the town, when I sent a negro in to gain information and found that the ram was truly sunk.

Proceeding through another swamp, I came to a creek and captured a skiff, belonging to a picket of the enemy, and with this, by 11 o'clock the next night, had made my way out to the Valley City.

Acting Master's Mate William L. Howorth, of the Monticello, showed, as usual, conspicuous bravery. He is the same officer who has been with me twice in Wilmington harbor. I trust he may be promoted, when exchanged, as well as Acting Third Assistant Engineer Stotesbury, who, being for the first time under fire, handled his engine promptly and with coolness. All the officers and men behaved in the most gallant manner. I will furnish their names to the Department as soon as they can be procured.

The cutter of the Shamrock boarded the Southfield, but found no gun. Four prisoners were taken there.

The ram is now completely submerged, and the enemy have sunk three schooners in the river to obstruct the passage of our ships.

I desire to call the attention of the admiral and Department to the spirit manifested by the sailors on the ships in these sounds. But few men were wanted, but all hands were eager to go into the action, many offering their chosen shipmates a month's pay to resign in their favor.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. CUSHING,
Lieutenant, U.S. Navy.

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Norfolk, VA
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US Navy engineer saw it all: Charleston blockade, 54th Mass. and George B. McClellan.