(5)

Arats Amateur Radio Association (ARATS) is located at Fire Headquarts 495 Zimmerman Street in North Tonawanda NY. Arats is part of North Tonawanda Emergency Services

Mission: The promotion and education of amateur radio.

The Latest Episode of ARRL Audio News is Now Available04/24/2020Listen to the new episode of ARRL Audio News on your iOS...
04/26/2020
ARRL Audio News

The Latest Episode of ARRL Audio News is Now Available
04/24/2020

Listen to the new episode of ARRL Audio News on your iOS or Android podcast app, or online at http://www.blubrry.com/arrlaudionews/. Audio News is also retransmitted on a number of FM repeaters. Click here and then scroll down to see the list.


AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More

Photo Gallery

ARRL's Audio News

Join us tonight at 8:30 pm for the Arats weekly Thursday 2 Meter Neton 146.955 PL 151.4.
04/23/2020

Join us tonight at 8:30 pm for the Arats weekly Thursday 2 Meter Net
on 146.955 PL 151.4.

04/23/2020

What nationality was WWI fighter ace The Red Baron, shot down this week in 1918?
A- French
B-ltalian
C-Austrian or D-German

04/23/2020

NOAA Updates Solar Cycle 25 Prediction
04/22/2020
Frank Donovan, W3LPL, notes that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) has published its official updated prediction of Solar Cycle 25 in new, interactive Solar Cycle Progression graphs. The updated prediction is based on the results of NOAA’s Solar Cycle 25 Prediction Panel.
“SWPC forecasts a solar maximum between 105 and 125, with the peak occurring between November 2024 and March 2026,” Donovan said. “There is broad consensus that solar minimum is ongoing this year — or may have already occurred — and that Cycle 25 will have no major change in the level of solar activity compared to Cycle 24.”
As Donovan explained, for many years the SWPC’s solar cycle predictions have used the Royal Observatory of Belgium’s International Sunspot Number. SWPC’s official solar cycle prediction now uses the SWPC sunspot number. The International Sunspot Number is typically about one-third lower than the SWPC sunspot number.
“While this is SWPC’s official Cycle 25 prediction, it’s important to note there is still divergence among various forecasting methods and members of the space weather forecasting community,” Donovan said. “Most forecasts and forecasters agree that the Cycle 25 is likely to be within ±20% of Cycle 24 and is likely to occur between 2024 and 2027.”
More information is on the Springer Nature website. — Thanks to The Daily DX

AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More

04/23/2020

ARRL Suggests Taking a Creative Approach to Field Day 2020
04/22/2020
This year, ARRL Field Day promises to be a unique iteration of this annual event, with many individuals and groups coming up with new and interesting ways to adjust their approach. As an event, Field Day is structured to be versatile and can be adapted for any situation.
Many groups have asked how they can adjust their Field Day planning to address social-distancing guidelines that may be in effect in many areas of the country, as gathering at their traditional Field Day site may not be feasible or safe. Instead of participating in a group event this year, consider operating as a Class B, C, D, or E station, utilizing your own call sign.
ARRL will include club names for all participating stations in the published results, so the efforts of your club’s members can be acknowledged. While we will not publish an aggregate club score, seeing the name of your club associated with various individual member’s results is certainly a way to highlight your club’s activity.
Myriad opportunities are possible in this year’s Field Day setting. These are just a couple.
Consider having an intra-club competition among members, seeing who can make the most contacts during the event. You can award prizes or distribute certificates at a club meeting. This can be a fun way to bolster the activities of individual club members, even though they cannot all gather together at the same location this year.
Set up a Field Day Challenge with rival clubs in neighboring communities. See how many members of each club get on the air from their own stations and participate in the event. In addition to “bragging rights,” perhaps certificates to the top-scoring individual entries in each category can be presented as part of this inter-club camaraderie.
One club is planning to conduct its Field Day as a 4A club group, with participants spaced to comply with social distancing guidelines within the required 1,000-foot diameter circle and operating individual stations. This club also plans to set up a “Get on the Air” (GOTA) station. The club’s plan is to have the GOTA coach at the Field Day site, while GOTA operators participate via remote link.
Another club is planning to set up a remote-controlled station at its usual Field Day site, with club members taking turns controlling the station from their homes. The club is developing a schedule that outlines when each member of the club will be at the helm via the remote link.
Whatever approach you take to this year’s Field Day, keep up to date with the current guidelines issued by local and state health agencies that may impact your proposed operation.
ARRL invites your stories about the interesting and creative ways you’re planning to use to adapt your Field Day operation. Share these on the ARRL Field Day page.
For the latest news and updates, visit the Field Day webpage. — Thanks to ARRL Contest Program Manager Paul Bourque, N1SFE



AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More
10

04/22/2020

Florida QSO Party Announces Stay-at-Home Adjustments
04/21/2020
The Florida QSO Party (FQP) takes place April 25 – 26, in two 10-hour operating periods — Saturday, 1600 –0159 UTC, and Sunday, 1200 – 2159 UTC. Several changes have been put in place, due to Florida’s stay-at-home mandate.
One major change: Mobile and Expedition categories have been suspended.
Also, club competition has been revised, and multioperator participants may be distributed within a Florida county (or within a state/province/or country for non-Florida entries). In the FQP, everyone works Florida, while Florida works everyone. The object is to work all Florida counties. Exchange report and Florida county or report and state/province/country for non-Florida participants. Bands are 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters, CW, SSB, or both, QRP, low-power, and high-power categories.
To mark the FQP’s 23rd anniversary, eight 1 × 1 special event station suffixes will spell “LOVEBUGS.” Full information is on the FQP website.

AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More
18

10 Meter Net Tonight at 8 pm28.330.00 with Jim N2UHJ.
04/21/2020

10 Meter Net Tonight at 8 pm
28.330.00 with Jim N2UHJ.

04/19/2020

Remotely Administered Amateur Exam Systems Showing Promise
Facing a growing demand for amateur radio exam sessions in a time of social distancing and stay-at-home orders, sponsors of some Volunteer Examiner (VE) teams have risen to the challenge and are developing systems to remotely proctor test sessions.
“Many of our VEs and VE Teams have been working on remotely proctored exam session ideas, employing both video and in-person components — following social distancing protocols,” ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM, said. “We have been receiving interesting and innovative suggestions, and we appreciate the dedication and ingenuity our examiners have shown.”
The Spalding County Amateur Radio Club in Georgia is among those that have come up with plans to remotely administer amateur exams while complying with ARRL VEC testing standards during COVID-19 stay-home mandates and social distancing guidelines. Current systems leverage Zoom video-teleconferencing technology, the “Fill & Sign” feature of Adobe PDFs, reliable email, appropriate computer equipment and internet connection, and no volunteer examiners (VEs) present at individual remote test sites. The Georgia club collaborated and shared ideas with the Emergency Amateur Radio Club (EARC) in Hawaii, which has successfully conducted sessions since 2011 with its own remote testing system, initially with paper exams with a proctor on site and now with fillable PDFs, with no on-site proctor.
The Georgia club obtained ARRL VEC approval to administer video-supervised exams. The club’s David Robinson, K4WVZ, said the first exam session took place this week, with another set for next week, and “many more in the pipeline” going forward.
“We have started with testing just one candidate at a time but are planning to ramp up to multiple candidates — probably two or three — simultaneously,” Robinson told ARRL. “Before we do that, we want a few more single sessions under our belt and a few more Video VEs trained. It also gives us an opportunity to garner lessons learned from each test session and upgrade our procedures accordingly.” Robinson said this week’s session went “exceedingly well,” and the candidate passed the test.
The club’s procedures entail a pre-exam video interview with candidates to ensure they understand all the requirements and procedures. “This also allows us to test the candidate’s ability to work with the video and computer technology before the actual exam,” Robinson explained. “Training sessions were conducted for VEs to make sure they understood their role and how to use the technology.”
Following the exam, the VEs score the test and sign off on the paperwork, with the VE Team Leader submitting the application online and by mail, per ARRL VEC instructions. Application and successful exam are first accepted and then submitted to the FCC for processing.
New England Amateur Radio Inc (NE1AR), an affiliate of New England Sci-Tech, (NESciTech), has taken it one step further, Somma said. It got the approval of ARRL VEC to begin trials of what it describes as “completely online testing with strict rules and protocols for maintaining the integrity of the testing environment.” NE1AR is limiting candidates to one exam per candidate, due to the current candidate backlog and the “difficulty of administering exams online.” Candidates must agree to a list of protocols, which include no visitors (or pets) in the exam room and a cell-phone camera scan of the entire room and exam area “to show that there are no materials or people [in the room] that could aid in taking the exam.” If the VE team suspects the possibility of cheating, the exam may be terminated and the candidate barred from future online exam sessions.
“We began a series of trials on April 1 under ARRL VEC review and have now been asked to help train more VE Teams on the process,” NE1AR President Bob Phinney, K5TEC, told ARRL. “We have now tested 12 applicants and are still working on streamlining the process. We are working with the software developer of the exam delivery system to help them adapt the system for video-supervised testing.” At present, Phinney said, only one person at a time can be tested. Another time-related issue is how long it takes a candidate to go through the NE1AR security protocol. “Sometimes, the setup and follow-up for an exam take far longer than the exam itself, in order that we provide complete integrity of the exam session,” he said.
With pressure continuing to build to provide testing compatible with COVID-19 guidelines and stay-home orders, ARRL VEC Manager Maria Somma, AB1FM, has asked the amateur radio community to be patient. “Please remember that with the introduction of significant new processes such as these, that there should be proof of concept, establishment of protocols and procedures, and beta testing, before expanding to a larger audience,” she said this week. Somma said video-supervised exam sessions require a different skillset than in-person exam administration, and not all teams will be equipped to deliver video exams right away.
“ARRL is pleased to be one of the leaders in providing an opportunity, although limited initially, for video-supervised exams in this time of social distancing and isolation required by the current health situation,” Somma said.

AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More
260

Photo Gallery

The Latest Episode of ARRL Audio News is Now Available04/17/2020Listen to the new episode of ARRL Audio News on your iOS...
04/19/2020
ARRL Audio News

The Latest Episode of ARRL Audio News is Now Available
04/17/2020

Listen to the new episode of ARRL Audio News on your iOS or Android podcast app, or online at http://www.blubrry.com/arrlaudionews/. Audio News is also retransmitted on a number of FM repeaters. Click here and then scroll down to see the list.

AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More

Photo Gallery

ARRL's Audio News

ARRL & Amateur Radio News LineRebroadcasted tonight at 9 pm.146.955
04/18/2020

ARRL & Amateur Radio News Line
Rebroadcasted tonight at 9 pm.
146.955

The May/June Digital Issues of QEX and NCJ are Now Available!04/17/2020The May/June digital editions of QEX and the Nati...
04/18/2020
ARRL Magazines

The May/June Digital Issues of QEX and NCJ are Now Available!
04/17/2020

The May/June digital editions of QEX and the National Contest Journal (NCJ) are now available for reading on your iOS or Android mobile device through the ARRL Magazines app, or with your desktop or laptop computer from the ARRL Magazines page on the web at www.arrl.org/arrl-magazines.
App users please note that you may need to clear the cache in the app’s Settings menu to fully update.
The digital versions of QEX and NCJ are new benefits for all ARRL members. Members now have exclusive access to four magazines, each with their own unique content: QST, On the Air, QEX, and NCJ.



AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More
14

Photo Gallery

Back
Back to Top
Having Trouble?
News & Features >> News
News
ARRL News: Coronavirus COVID-19
ARRL Audio News
Features and Columns
ARRL Periodicals Archive Search
QST
On the Air Magazine
QEX
NCJ
ARRL Letter
News Tips
Doctor
So Now What?
Eclectic
ARRL Magazines

The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the national association for amateur radio, connecting hams around the U.S. with news, information and resources.

The K7RA Solar Update04/17/2020Sunspots are gone again. We are at the bottom of the solar cycle, so conditions should on...
04/18/2020
Welcome to the W7GJ Home Page!

The K7RA Solar Update
04/17/2020
Sunspots are gone again. We are at the bottom of the solar cycle, so conditions should only get better. There is an increase in on-air activity due to the large number of people staying at home because of Covid-19, and this week we seem to be overwhelmed with reports of sporadic E openings.
The last observed sunspot disappeared on April 5, so weekly average daily sunspot numbers declined from 5.1 last week to zero this reporting week, April 9-15. Average daily solar flux went from 70.2 to 69.5.
Geomagnetic indicators remain quiet as well, with average daily estimated planetary A index going from 6.6 to 6.1, and mid-latitude numbers, sourced from a single magnetometer in Virginia, to 5 from 5.3.
Predicted solar flux is 69 on April 17-24, 70 on April 25 through May 8, 68 on May 9-20, and 70 on May 21-31.
Predicted planetary A index is 8 on April 17-18, 12 and 8 on April 19-20, 5 on April 21-25, 10 on April 26-27, 5 on April 28-29, 8 on April 30, 5 on May 1-4, then 12, 5, 8 and 8 on May 5-8, then 5 on May 9-11, 10 on May 12, 8 on May 13-16, 5 on May 17-22, 10 on May 23-24, then 5, 5 and 8 on May 25-27, and 5 on May 28-31.
Geomagnetic activity forecast for April 17 until May 12, 2020 from F.K. Janda, OK1HH:
Geomagnetic field will be
Quiet on April 20-21, May 2-3, 6
Quiet to Unsettled on April 17-18, 22-24, 28-29
Quiet to Active on (April 25, May 1, 5, 7-9, 12)
Unsettled to active on (April 19, 26-27, 30, May 4, 10-11)
Active to Disturbed: nothing!
Solar wind will intensify on April 17-19, (20,) 26-28, May 4-6, 8-10
Remarks:
- Parenthesis means lower probability of activity enhancement.
- The predictability of changes remains lower as there are no indicators.

Edgar Leighton, HI8PLE, wrote on April 11 from Dominican Republic: "The sporadic E season started very well here. There has been a great activity on 144 MHz in the Caribbean. On April 9, 2140 UTC, I worked PJ2BR and on April 11 0027 UTC worked J69DS. On the same day at 1936, I contacted 9Y4D and 9Z4D. Finally, on April 12 at 0113, I worked YY5BRB. All contacts were made using FT8 with 16 element beam and 150 watts.
“I have noticed that the conditions with the Lesser Antilles are steady and last all day and night, then, at dusk some TEP activity on 50 MHz.”

Danny Miller, KB8W (EN57) wrote: "Yesterday, April 14, was the earliest Es/TEP activity that I have ever experienced here in EN57 (in the far NW corner of Michigan's Upper Peninsula).
"I have been active for the past 10 years on 6 meters. I looked back in my logs and find that the first Es activity of the spring season is usually in early May; in 2019 my first contact was on May 10. But I have never even heard anyone via Es in April of any year (I have made contacts via meteor scatter in all months of the year).
“Six meters opened for me at about 1710Z on April 14 when I copied CM2XM (EL83) on 50.313 MHz using FT8. Over the next 10 hours I worked 19 stations in New England, the Gulf Coast and Cuba.
"According to PSKReporter, I was heard at 2202Z by TI2CDA (EJ79) and at 2201Z by HK4GSO (FJ26). Those are the first TEP receptions that I have experienced. I was still hearing signals when I turned off the radio and went to bed at about 0400Z April 15.
“For me, a remarkable day as I run only 50 W to a 5 element Yagi."

William Herzberg, AA8WH, writes from Michigan: "Starting April 14 at about 2246 UTC, 6 meters was open on FT8. I worked NK4DX, in Fort Lauderdale. When 6 died down, I moved down to 12 meters, and worked KN4NN in Crawfordville, Florida and W9OO in Harvey, Illinois. I then moved up to 10 meters and worked WZ9B in Noble, Illinois, N4UXP in Atlanta, Georgia, NT4J in Fuquay Varina, North Carolina, and AB0S in Beloit, Kansas.
“At 0324 UTC, signal strengths were up to S7 on the peaks. I worked N5LFA in Potts Camp, Mississippi, WB4HMA in Nashville, Tennessee, N4JRS in Oakwood, Georgia, and J68HZ on St. Lucia. Ten meters continued to stay open well past 0400 UTC."

Lance Collister, W7JG, wrote from Frenchtown, Montana: "April 15 was the best 6-meter activity I have ever seen this early in the season. Unlike the eastern half of the country, out here in western Montana we normally are one or two hops away from linking into any high TEC activity and/or TEP propagation. Usually, it seems a higher Kp index is required to cause 6-meter Es openings to the south from up here. But perhaps because the Kp index had been up to 3 on both April 14 and early on April 15, plus the time of year, had something to do with it. Anyway, the 6-meter band was open from here in western Montana to the southeast for 9 hours, and I worked my first HC (Ecuador) station since I got on 6 meters 24 years ago! In addition to many domestic contacts, these DX stations were all worked on 50.313 using FT8 mode: XE1KK, XE1K, XE1EE, XE1H, TI2CDA,TG9AJR, TG9ANF, HP2DFA, HK3PJ, HC2DR, HC5VF, HC2AO, OA4DOS, LW2DAF, LU5CQC, LU2DPW, and CX6DRA.
"Normally up here, we wouldn't think a big Es opening before the end of May was possible! I am sure it helped that so many people were sequestered at home during the pandemic and able to be by their radios. This may be a once in a lifetime event, but it sure was memorable. I’m looking forward to the great 6-meter moonbounce conditions at the end of this month to pick up another all-time new one!"
Check out Lance's web page at http://www.bigskyspaces.com/w7gj/

Dave Bono, K6OAK, of Fremont, California wrote: "We are in the middle of week 5 of Stay at Home restrictions here in the San Francisco area. I thought I would use the opportunity of being home to make some improvements to my 6BTV ground mounted vertical antenna. So, I checked all my cable connections and added two 33-foot radials and a few shorter ground radials. Then I went into the shack shortly after 2200Z and fired up the Kenwood 590SG to see if there was any improvement. Listening to FT8 there were signals on all bands from 6 to 40 meters! What a difference! I worked a bunch on 10 meters in short order at under 30 watts. I wish I could say it was the radials, but I’m sure it was just a coincidence that the bands opened up after being very stingy for the prior few days and weeks!"

Mike Treister, W9NY, operates from the top of a tall building in Chicago: "To my surprise, 10 meters and 6 meters were full of stations coming in to Chicago the evenings of April 14-15. Using a non-directional poorly matched antenna (G5RV for 20 meters up 450 feet) with 100 watts on SSB I worked several stations around the country on 10 and some on 6 meters including Mexico. Can't wait for those sunspots!”

Martin McCormick, WB5AGZ, wrote: “There was a whopper of a 10-meter opening to Oklahoma on Tuesday, April 14, from around 16:30 Central Daylight Time until it all faded out near midnight. As heard from a discone about 50 feet above the ground, signals on 10 from the East Coast of the US rolled in from the New York City Area down to North Carolina with lots of different signals fading in and out over each other, which is quintessential Sporadic E behavior.
“It all appears to have started rather suddenly at about 16:45 local time. The scanner was hearing business and public safety signals from local sources and then W4BWW in East Tennessee came in out of the blue talking to a station in Kansas, which was inaudible from here, here being about 60 miles South of the Oklahoma/Kansas border. That exchange was probably on 29.6 MHz as it was FM simplex.
“The next signal was a repeater ID in North Carolina in which all one could hear was a female voice saying "North Carolina” at the end.
“After that, it was crazy-town on steroids. There was an MCW ID for a repeater in the 3rd or 4th call area that was too mutilated to read. It later turned out to be N3AUY in Maryland.
“One of the signals in for a good portion of the evening was the WA3PBD repeater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It's full MCW ID is WA3PBD/R PGH and its signal was present, though occasionally blotted out by temporarily stronger signals from other repeaters before coming back in. Another briefly heard system was the KD2WA repeater whose voice ID gives the PL tone as 110.9 Hz in a synthesized male voice.
“I did possibly hear a Florida station, but am not sure if I actually heard him on simplex or he was hitting one of the repeaters. The scanner is set to scan 29.6 through 29.680 in 20 kHz steps and the band opening was good enough to make this a very chaotic experience.
“Newcomers to amateur radio who heard this opening got to hear what 10-meter FM was like in previous sunspot maxima, even though this is the bottom of the barrel for solar activity. Sporadic E is like the Spanish Inquisition mentioned in the ‘Monty Python’ TV series in which the line ‘Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition’ became popularized.
“Also, what anybody hearing all this chaos may not realize is that there was once a time in which the 30 to 50 MHZ band was the work-a-day band for business and public safety communications in the Americas. During the incredible Solar Maximum of 1958, hundreds of cities and small towns alike would jam each other's radio systems with full-quieting foreign traffic as they tried to do routine business. FM signals from the Boston Fire Department were full quieting in Oklahoma and surrounding states on 33.77 MHz on just about any winter day that year. Those band openings spurred the move to higher VHF and UHF frequencies where most mobile business and emergency services now live.”

If you would like to make a comment or have a tip for our readers, email the author at [email protected].

For more information concerning radio propagation, see http://www.arrl.org/propagation and the ARRL Technical Information Service at http://arrl.org/propagation-of-rf-signals. For an explanation of numbers used in this bulletin, see http://arrl.org/the-sun-the-earth-the-ionosphere.
An archive of past propagation bulletins is at http://arrl.org/w1aw-bulletins-archive-propagation. More good information and tutorials on propagation are at http://k9la.us/.
Monthly propagation charts between four USA regions and twelve overseas locations are at http://arrl.org/propagation.
Instructions for starting or ending email distribution of ARRL bulletins are at http://arrl.org/bulletins.
Sunspot numbers for April 9 through 15, 2020 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a mean of 0. 10.7 cm flux was 70.3, 69.2, 70.6, 70.8, 70.3, 68.9, and 68.4, with a mean of 69.5. Estimated planetary A indices were 5, 5, 6, 7, 5, 8, and 7, with a mean of 6.1. Middle latitude A index was 5, 4, 4, 5, 4, 7, and 6, with a mean of 5.

AddThis Sharing Buttons
Share to Facebook

Facebook
Share to Twitter

Twitter
Share to LinkedIn

LinkedIn
Share to Reddit

Reddit
Share to More

More

Photo Gallery

Address

495 Zimmerman Street
North Tonawanda, NY
14120

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Arats posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Arats:

ARATS-Amateur Radio Association of the Tonawanda’s. Our E.O.C. is located in the Basement of the North Tonawanda Fire Dept.

Welcome to our site and thank you for visiting our page, our club is located in North Tonawanda New York with 40 paid members. Our Board of Directors holds meetings on the second Saturday of every month and our monthly meetings are held every third Wednesday at 7:30 pm, meetings are held at Tonawanda City Hall. Our EOC is located at the North Tonawanda Fire HQ. 495 Zimmerman Street, North Tonawanda NY. We provide emergency communications for the North Tonawanda Fire Dept. and our Police Dept. Our mission statement is the promotion of amateur radio as well as the education and good will to our members and our community. We are always looking for new members so if you are interested in becoming a licensed Amateur Radio Operator please call one of our board members, for more information please visit www.arrl.com.

Arats 10 Meter Net Tuesday Nights at 8 pm 28.330.oo USB

Arats 2 Meter Net Thursday Nights at 8:30 pm, 146.955 PL 151.5 - Off Set.


Comments

Concord, Ohio
Received several awesome pointers at last night's meeting. Hand held model recommendation. UB 70cm repeater frequency, ECHOLINK google search tip, generous free J pole antenna , and proper feed line ohm resistance, All in a two or three minute pleasant conversation.Thank you Lou K2EAI.
I have started the WNY/Finger Lakes DMR Users Group on Facebook for those interested in getting into DMR. It is meant for those just starting out. There is lso a DMR Net on Sunday evenings at 8pm on the KD2FRD repeater (443.600+ CC1 TS1) and also on the 31369 Brandmeister TG. Feel free to join in! https://www.facebook.com/groups/2021763894530022/
I will miss all my friends for the meeting tonight. I will be missing you and thinking of you. Have fun. 73 Mark. ( not well enough to make it tonight )
Not sure if I can make it to Saturday's Board meeting.