National Punctuation Day

National Punctuation Day A celebration of the lowly comma, correctly used quotation marks, and other uses of periods, semicolons, and the ever-mysterious ellipses. Begun in 2004, National Punctuation Day is featured in Chase's Calendar of Events.

It's celebrated September 24. National Punctuation Day was founded in 2004 to draw attention to the importance of proper punctuation. It's a day for librarians, educators, and parents — people who are interested in teaching and promoting good writing skills to their students and their children. It's also a day to remind business people that they are often judged by how they present themselves.

Operating as usual

Sandra Boynton promoted National Punctuation Day!
09/25/2021

Sandra Boynton promoted National Punctuation Day!

Sandra Boynton promoted National Punctuation Day!

It’s NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY! How are you celebrating?
09/24/2021

It’s NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY! How are you celebrating?

It’s NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY! How are you celebrating?

National Punctuation Day #18 is tomorrow, September 24. How will you celebrate?
09/23/2021

National Punctuation Day #18 is tomorrow, September 24. How will you celebrate?

National Punctuation Day #18 is tomorrow, September 24. How will you celebrate?

PICK AN ACTIVITY TO CELEBRATENATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY 2021The 18th annual National Punctuation Day® is this Friday, Sept...
09/18/2021

PICK AN ACTIVITY TO CELEBRATE
NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY 2021

The 18th annual National Punctuation Day® is this Friday, September 24! This year NPD welcomes students and teachers back to their classrooms! Stay safe and enjoy learning!

TEACHERS: Here are a few ideas to celebrate NPD in the classroom. Have FUN!

• Have your students take pictures of incorrectly punctuated signs in your community (street signs, businesses, menus, etc.). Ask them to explain why these signs are incorrectly punctuated. Have a contest where the class picks the funniest sign.

• Have your students write a short essay of no more than 250 words on a specific topic. For example, “What’s the most important thing you learned during the Covid-19 pandemic.” Essays must use all 13 punctuation marks on the National Punctuation Day website at least once. Give prizes to the three best paragraphs. Perhaps your students can vote.

• Have your students make costumes showcasing their favorite punctuation mark and ask them to explain why that punctuation mark is their favorite. Have students vote for the best costume and explanation.

• Have students bake cakes, pies, and cookies decorated with their favorite punctuation mark — or in the shape of their favorite punctuation mark. Have a contest with prizes for the winners of the tastiest baked items.

• There are several grammar and punctuation songs online. Perhaps some of your students can learn and perform these songs. Award prizes for the best performances.

HAPPY NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY!

PICK AN ACTIVITY TO CELEBRATE
NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY 2021

The 18th annual National Punctuation Day® is this Friday, September 24! This year NPD welcomes students and teachers back to their classrooms! Stay safe and enjoy learning!

TEACHERS: Here are a few ideas to celebrate NPD in the classroom. Have FUN!

• Have your students take pictures of incorrectly punctuated signs in your community (street signs, businesses, menus, etc.). Ask them to explain why these signs are incorrectly punctuated. Have a contest where the class picks the funniest sign.

• Have your students write a short essay of no more than 250 words on a specific topic. For example, “What’s the most important thing you learned during the Covid-19 pandemic.” Essays must use all 13 punctuation marks on the National Punctuation Day website at least once. Give prizes to the three best paragraphs. Perhaps your students can vote.

• Have your students make costumes showcasing their favorite punctuation mark and ask them to explain why that punctuation mark is their favorite. Have students vote for the best costume and explanation.

• Have students bake cakes, pies, and cookies decorated with their favorite punctuation mark — or in the shape of their favorite punctuation mark. Have a contest with prizes for the winners of the tastiest baked items.

• There are several grammar and punctuation songs online. Perhaps some of your students can learn and perform these songs. Award prizes for the best performances.

HAPPY NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY!

When do you use a semicolon?
06/21/2021

When do you use a semicolon?

When do you use a semicolon?

01/13/2021
NORTH CAROLINA TEACHER WINS 2020 NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY CONTESTThis year’s National Punctuation Day contest offered an...
12/28/2020

NORTH CAROLINA TEACHER WINS 2020 NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY CONTEST

This year’s National Punctuation Day contest offered an opportunity for teachers to describe the challenges they are facing in our new-world remote environment.

Teachers were asked to explain their best methods of teaching virtually, including the challenges remote teaching presents and how they’ve overcome them.

The most intriguing response received was from Leigh Ann Coffey, who teaches AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) and ESL (English as a Second Language) in grades K-12 at Blue Ridge School and Early College in Cashiers, NC.

Rather than detail the problems and issues of teaching remotely, Leigh Ann wrote about her opportunity to learn new and more efficient methods for teaching.

Her essay, “These Challenging Times,” is the 2020 NPD winner. Here’s what she wrote:

“How often have we heard the phrase ‘these challenging times’ this year? While most advertisers are referring to the struggles of navigating the changes brought about by Covid-19, it’s inspiring to remember that a challenge isn’t always a bad thing.

“There’s no denying that the challenges teachers have faced while adjusting to remote learning have been difficult, trying, and generally un-fun; however, this has also been an amazing opportunity to learn new and more efficient methods for teaching.

“The primary meaning of ‘challenge’ is not a hardship, but rather a call to demonstrate skill or strength. In that sense, Covid-19 has summoned teachers to show off their amazing abilities in a way we’ve never seen before. This challenge has made us all better, more capable contenders as we engage in a new battle for the education of our children.

“In trying to ensure that all students, regardless of technology concerns, parental work situations, or health conditions have access to education, many teachers have been forced to strip their lessons down to what’s essential (another pandemic buzzword). But what about students who need a challenge?

“I teach Academically and Intellectually Gifted (AIG) students, and for them, remote learning is pretty boring. Therefore, I decided to stimulate their brains by sending educational videos with thought-provoking questions about topics that ordinarily aren’t taught in general educational settings in order to provide them with a broader scope of knowledge and interest.

“So, what new skills have ‘these challenging times’ pushed us to learn?”

*************************************************************

ABOUT LEIGH ANN: I started teaching ESL in 2015. I originally planned to teach high school English, but the ESL position was available, so I took it. I soon fell in love with everything about teaching ESL, from getting to teach all age groups to the wonderful cultural experiences it has afforded me. I also am a major "word nerd," so I love that I am constantly learning new things about English that I would never think about as a native speaker.

I began teaching AIG in 2019 in addition to ESL after spending three years as an itinerate teacher at three different schools. Rather than teaching ESL at multiple schools, I am now able to be both the ESL and AIG teacher at the school where I originally began.

Teaching AIG has also allowed me to share my love of language with students as we dive deeper into the subjects that often are skimmed over in the mainstream curriculum.

NORTH CAROLINA TEACHER WINS 2020 NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY CONTEST

This year’s National Punctuation Day contest offered an opportunity for teachers to describe the challenges they are facing in our new-world remote environment.

Teachers were asked to explain their best methods of teaching virtually, including the challenges remote teaching presents and how they’ve overcome them.

The most intriguing response received was from Leigh Ann Coffey, who teaches AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) and ESL (English as a Second Language) in grades K-12 at Blue Ridge School and Early College in Cashiers, NC.

Rather than detail the problems and issues of teaching remotely, Leigh Ann wrote about her opportunity to learn new and more efficient methods for teaching.

Her essay, “These Challenging Times,” is the 2020 NPD winner. Here’s what she wrote:

“How often have we heard the phrase ‘these challenging times’ this year? While most advertisers are referring to the struggles of navigating the changes brought about by Covid-19, it’s inspiring to remember that a challenge isn’t always a bad thing.

“There’s no denying that the challenges teachers have faced while adjusting to remote learning have been difficult, trying, and generally un-fun; however, this has also been an amazing opportunity to learn new and more efficient methods for teaching.

“The primary meaning of ‘challenge’ is not a hardship, but rather a call to demonstrate skill or strength. In that sense, Covid-19 has summoned teachers to show off their amazing abilities in a way we’ve never seen before. This challenge has made us all better, more capable contenders as we engage in a new battle for the education of our children.

“In trying to ensure that all students, regardless of technology concerns, parental work situations, or health conditions have access to education, many teachers have been forced to strip their lessons down to what’s essential (another pandemic buzzword). But what about students who need a challenge?

“I teach Academically and Intellectually Gifted (AIG) students, and for them, remote learning is pretty boring. Therefore, I decided to stimulate their brains by sending educational videos with thought-provoking questions about topics that ordinarily aren’t taught in general educational settings in order to provide them with a broader scope of knowledge and interest.

“So, what new skills have ‘these challenging times’ pushed us to learn?”

*************************************************************

ABOUT LEIGH ANN: I started teaching ESL in 2015. I originally planned to teach high school English, but the ESL position was available, so I took it. I soon fell in love with everything about teaching ESL, from getting to teach all age groups to the wonderful cultural experiences it has afforded me. I also am a major "word nerd," so I love that I am constantly learning new things about English that I would never think about as a native speaker.

I began teaching AIG in 2019 in addition to ESL after spending three years as an itinerate teacher at three different schools. Rather than teaching ESL at multiple schools, I am now able to be both the ESL and AIG teacher at the school where I originally began.

Teaching AIG has also allowed me to share my love of language with students as we dive deeper into the subjects that often are skimmed over in the mainstream curriculum.

12/17/2020

🎅

10/24/2020

The deadline for this year's National Punctuation Day® essay contest is only 7 DAYS AWAY.

That's right! The deadline for entries is Saturday, October 31.

This year's contest is a teachers-only event. It honors the people who are keeping our language — and young minds — alive and active in an unprecedented education environment: OUR TEACHERS!

THE RULES
In an essay of no more than 250 words, explain your best methods of teaching virtually. Include the challenges remote teaching presents and how you’ve overcome them.

SUBMITTING THE ESSAYS
1. E-mail them to [email protected].
2. In the subject header write 2020 NPD ESSAY CONTEST.
3. Include your name, address, phone number, school name and location, and grade you teach.

Once again: The deadline for entries is October 31.

The winner will receive an assortment of branded National Punctuation Day® gifts, including a commemorative pen, ruler, question mark-shaped stress toy, and bookmarks. And, possibly some other wonderful gifts if the entry is impossibly clever, brilliant, and dazzling.

To all of the teachers reading this: WE RESPECT YOU AND THANK YOU! Send in your essays!

The National Punctuation Day® essay contest is only two days old and already we've had an entry. It's from Leigh Ann Cof...
09/26/2020

The National Punctuation Day® essay contest is only two days old and already we've had an entry. It's from Leigh Ann Coffey, who teaches AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) and ESL (English as a Second Language) in grades K-12 at Blue Ridge School and Early College in Cashiers, NC.

It's a terrific essay. The judges at NPD headquarters are looking forward to seeing more essays from teachers. The submission deadline is October 31.

The National Punctuation Day® essay contest is only two days old and already we've had an entry. It's from Leigh Ann Coffey, who teaches AIG (Academically and Intellectually Gifted) and ESL (English as a Second Language) in grades K-12 at Blue Ridge School and Early College in Cashiers, NC.

It's a terrific essay. The judges at NPD headquarters are looking forward to seeing more essays from teachers. The submission deadline is October 31.

IT'S NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY®National Punctuation Day® celebrates its 17th anniversary today with a salute to the peopl...
09/24/2020

IT'S NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY®

National Punctuation Day® celebrates its 17th anniversary today with a salute to the people who are keeping our language — and young minds — alive and active in an unprecedented education environment: OUR TEACHERS!

So, with National Punctuation Day®’s appreciation for their extraordinary efforts, this year's contest is a teachers-only event.

TEACHERS: In an essay of no more than 250 words, explain your best methods of teaching virtually. Include the challenges remote teaching presents and how you’ve overcome them.

SUBMITTING THE ESSAYS
1. E-mail them to [email protected].
2. In the subject header write 2020 NPD ESSAY CONTEST.
3. Include your name, address, phone number, school name and location, and grade you teach.

The deadline for entries is October 31.

The winner will receive an assortment of branded National Punctuation Day® gifts, including a commemorative pen, ruler, question mark-shaped stress toy, and bookmarks. And, possibly some other wonderful gifts if the entry is impossibly clever, brilliant, and dazzling.

My teacher friends tell me these circumstances have been stressful. To all of the teachers reading this: WE RESPECT YOU AND THANK YOU!

IT'S NATIONAL PUNCTUATION DAY®

National Punctuation Day® celebrates its 17th anniversary today with a salute to the people who are keeping our language — and young minds — alive and active in an unprecedented education environment: OUR TEACHERS!

So, with National Punctuation Day®’s appreciation for their extraordinary efforts, this year's contest is a teachers-only event.

TEACHERS: In an essay of no more than 250 words, explain your best methods of teaching virtually. Include the challenges remote teaching presents and how you’ve overcome them.

SUBMITTING THE ESSAYS
1. E-mail them to [email protected].
2. In the subject header write 2020 NPD ESSAY CONTEST.
3. Include your name, address, phone number, school name and location, and grade you teach.

The deadline for entries is October 31.

The winner will receive an assortment of branded National Punctuation Day® gifts, including a commemorative pen, ruler, question mark-shaped stress toy, and bookmarks. And, possibly some other wonderful gifts if the entry is impossibly clever, brilliant, and dazzling.

My teacher friends tell me these circumstances have been stressful. To all of the teachers reading this: WE RESPECT YOU AND THANK YOU!

Only 1 day until National Punctuation Day, September 24! How will you celebrate?
09/23/2020

Only 1 day until National Punctuation Day, September 24! How will you celebrate?

Only 1 day until National Punctuation Day, September 24! How will you celebrate?

On 2 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
09/22/2020

On 2 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

On 2 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

Only 3 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!PHOTO: Punctuation Meatloaf contest from several years ago.
09/21/2020

Only 3 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

PHOTO: Punctuation Meatloaf contest from several years ago.

Only 3 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

PHOTO: Punctuation Meatloaf contest from several years ago.

Only 4 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
09/20/2020

Only 4 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

Only 4 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

Only 5 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
09/19/2020

Only 5 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

Master the comma and write more effectively starting today with this FREE Comma Mini Course by my punctuation colleague ...
09/18/2020
Grammar Lion: Comma Mini Course

Master the comma and write more effectively starting today with this FREE Comma Mini Course by my punctuation colleague Ellen Field.

Ellen has been an online grammar instructor for more than 19 years; more than 43,000 students have enrolled in her courses. She holds a master's degree in writing from the Johns Hopkins University and has taught college courses online and in the traditional classroom, including creative writing, developmental writing, and English composition.

Ellen has worked as a newspaper reporter and copy chief, personal essayist, website reviewer, and writing coach.

https://www.grammar-lion.com/courses/comma-mini-course.

Enroll now for FREE in Ellen Feld’s demo online grammar course. She

Only 6 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
09/18/2020

Only 6 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

Only 7 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
09/17/2020

Only 7 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!

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Comments

Only 4 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
Only 4 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
Only 6 days until National Punctuation Day, September 24!
I forgot to send this yesterday!
Commas really DO save lives!