State Archives of NC Photos

State Archives of NC Photos This page features highlights from our vast holdings of over three million photographs.
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The State Archives of North Carolina collects, preserves, and makes available for public use historical and evidential materials relating to North Carolina. This page features highlights from our vast holdings of over three million photographs, part of the Audiovisual Materials Unit. For more information on the AV Materials Unit, see http://archives.ncdcr.gov/Public/Collections/Non-Government/Audiovisual-Materials. The Archives is part of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, which includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette's Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the N.C. Symphony, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology. To learn more about the NC DNCR, please see https://www.ncdcr.gov/.

Colony superintendent poses on the porch of his house at New Berlin, Columbus County, c. 1909.We’re highlighting Columbu...
04/30/2020

Colony superintendent poses on the porch of his house at New Berlin, Columbus County, c. 1909.

We’re highlighting Columbus County today as a part of our newest departmental initiative, Hello NC, where we celebrate the people, culture, and stories of rural North Carolina.⁣⁣

New Berlin, later renamed Delco, was one of six planned farm colonies developed in southeastern North Carolina between 1905 and 1912. The dream of Wilmington utilities magnate Hugh MacRae, the colonies were visualized as an experiment in "human engineering" to create a "back to the land" movement as a remedy to the economic ills of the rural South. Hugh Macrae was often quoted as saying, "The South will come into its own when its fields are green in winter."

The six communities (Castle Haynes, Marathon, St. Helena, Van Eeden, New Berlin and Artesia) were anomalies in that they were miniature "melting pots" for the flood of European immigrants who flocked to America in the early 1900s.

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PhC.150.84
From the Hugh MacRae Photograph Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.

The State Archives of North Carolina is interested in preserving your stories from the COVID-19 era. Have you taken phot...
04/29/2020

The State Archives of North Carolina is interested in preserving your stories from the COVID-19 era.

Have you taken photographs, written about your experience or collected printed material relating to the pandemic? If so, please consider allowing the State Archives of NC to house this material for future generations.

Learn more here: https://archives.ncdcr.gov/researchers/your-story-north-carolina%E2%80%99s-story

Jim Valvano is seen with 7' 5" NC State player Chuck Nevitt, 12 January 1981. Nevitt remains one of the tallest players ...
04/28/2020

Jim Valvano is seen with 7' 5" NC State player Chuck Nevitt, 12 January 1981. Nevitt remains one of the tallest players ever to play for NC State and the NBA. ⁣

On this day in 1993, Jim Valvano died of cancer at the age of 47. Valvano was born in Queens, New York, played basketball at Rutgers University and had several coaching positions before coming to North Carolina State as head coach in 1980. In a series of inspiring and improbable last minute victories, he led the Wolfpack to the championship of the men’s NCAA basketball tournament in 1983. Sports Illustrated included the achievement as one of the top 10 sporting events of the 20th century.⁣

In 1992, Valvano was diagnosed with terminal cancer. In the final months of his life, he helped establish the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research, whose motto, “Don’t Give Up…Don’t Ever Give Up!” reflects Valvano’s eternal optimism. His last public appearance occurred when he received the Arthur Ashe Award for Courage from ESPN in March of 1993.⁣

The broadcast of his inspirational speech at the ESPY awards ceremony has become an annual tradition on the network and has helped the V Foundation raise over 120 million dollars for cancer research--a fitting legacy to a man who inspired a nation both on and off the basketball court.⁣
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NO_24156⁣
From the N&O negative Collection, State Archives of North Carolina. Photo copyrighted by the News and Observer. Illegal to use without express permission from the N&O.
Source: https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2013/04/28/jimmy-v-died-of-cancer

Pictured is the Joel Lane house in Raleigh c. 1880. This is one of the earliest photographs of the house, taken well bef...
04/24/2020

Pictured is the Joel Lane house in Raleigh c. 1880. This is one of the earliest photographs of the house, taken well before it was moved to its present-day location in 1911.⁣

The decision to make Raleigh the new capital of North Carolina was made at the Joel Lane House in 1792. 1,000 acres of land surrounding the house were purchased from Lane to form what is now Raleigh. Lane, who constructed the home around 1760, was a prominent figure in colonial North Carolina and the Revolution, serving as a representative in the General Assembly and a member of the two constitutional conventions in 1788 and 1789. In 1770, during his time in the General Assembly, Lane introduced the bill which formed Wake County.⁣

Recently, in the process of repairing deterioration, evidence was found pointing to the original color of house--an attractive shade of deep red. After an extensive exterior renovation, the house now wears what is thought to be its original color. ⁣

The house now operates as a museum and is temporarily closed due to our current circumstances, but please make plans to visit once it is safe to do so. ⁣
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N.53.16.2627⁣
From the Albert Barden Collection, State Archives of NC.
Joel Lane Museum House

Looking south down Fayetteville Street in Raleigh c. 1917. We hope the gentleman on the left got his truck going. It's n...
04/23/2020

Looking south down Fayetteville Street in Raleigh c. 1917.

We hope the gentleman on the left got his truck going. It's not there today, so we assume he did!

Happy Thursday!
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PhC.68.103
From the Carolina Power and Light Photograph Collection, State Archives of North Carolina

North Carolina once had hundreds of covered bridges. Usually spanning rivers or small streams, these bridges were a vita...
04/22/2020

North Carolina once had hundreds of covered bridges. Usually spanning rivers or small streams, these bridges were a vital part of the nation's early transportation network. Now, only two original covered bridges remain in our state, the Bunker Hill Covered Bridge in Claremont and the Pisgah Covered Bridge in Asheboro.

The bridge seen here, photographed c. 1938, was located near Clayton in Johnston County and spanned the Neuse River. Originally constructed without a roof in 1863, it is believed the roof was added in 1883 during repairs to the bridge.

An increase in traffic, heavier automobiles and age necessitated its removal in 1940 and it was replaced with a concrete bridge.
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ConDev1670
From the Conservation and Development Photo File, State Archives of NC.

Pictured is a tintype depicting Elmira Helen Powell (1826-1904) with an accompanying letter c. 1860.The short letter rea...
04/21/2020

Pictured is a tintype depicting Elmira Helen Powell (1826-1904) with an accompanying letter c. 1860.

The short letter reads, “Dear Uncle Henry, There is a likeness of one of the best women in the world, Elmira H. Powell. She sends it to you with her love to yourself and family, she says if you do not want it you can send it back. We are all well at present write to me as soon as you get it. My love and a kiss to all. -Jennie"

This tintype is from one of our favorite family collections, the Sally Smith Photo Collection which is now available to view in its entirety on our Flickr page.

This collection contains a wide range of formats including, card photographs, cabinet cards, silver gelatin prints, tintypes and one daguerreotype. The photographs depict various family members and scenes associated with the Smith family of Raleigh, many of whom are descendants of Joel Lane and Col. Nathaniel Lane.

Take a look! https://www.flickr.com/photos/north-carolina-state-archives/albums/72157713972829187

Here's something weird for your Friday. Luther Shipman of Hendersonville is seen with his invention, the "Odor Wave Mach...
04/17/2020

Here's something weird for your Friday. Luther Shipman of Hendersonville is seen with his invention, the "Odor Wave Machine" c. 1938.

After one particularly exhausting and fruitless night hunting raccoons, Shipman and his trusty hunting dog came up with naught. With trust in his canine companion waning, Shipman decided to invent a machine to sniff out the critters.

Gathering together some old flashlights, an assortment of batteries and various other bits found in the dusty corners of his workshop, he created a machine with 76 "smelling cells" for sniffing out animals. As a bonus, he claimed it could also track down humans, point to precious metals in the earth and detect ailments like cancer and tuberculosis--all that and it had a range of 7850 miles! Shipman declared that the machine brought to light trouble with is father's kidneys and located some old lost guns for a friend.

We hope he never lost his drive to invent!
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ConDev1313
From the Conservation and Development Photograph File, State Archives of NC.

Pictured is Elijah W. Baum's General Store and Post Office in Kitty Hawk, NC c. 1938. The Baum name in the Kitty Hawk ar...
04/16/2020

Pictured is Elijah W. Baum's General Store and Post Office in Kitty Hawk, NC c. 1938.

The Baum name in the Kitty Hawk area has deep roots with many members of the family playing key roles in the history of the Outer Banks.

As many know, Kitty Hawk was chosen by the Wright Brothers for the testing of their Wright Flyer due to the unique landscape and weather conditions. After their location was settled upon, Wilbur Wright corresponded with and befriended a local couple named Bill and Addie Tate who ran the Kitty Hawk post office. After an arduous journey from Ohio, a hungry and weather-beaten Wilbur arrived in Kitty Hawk 13 September 1900 and a 14-year-old Elijah Baum was the first person he encountered on the island. Baum eagerly directed Wilbur to Bill and Addie's home where he lodged until Orville arrived later in October.

Later, in 1907, Elijah Baum succeeded Addie as postmaster and built the general store seen here. Baum and his wife Hettie had a life-long passion for Kitty Hawk's roots in aviation and were heavily involved in the celebrations to commemorate the Wright Brothers' 1903 flight in 1949 and 1953.

Another member of the Baum clan to make history was Carolista Fletcher Baum. In 1973 she placed herself in the path of a bulldozer removing sand from Jockey’s Ridge and refused to move. The driver cut off the engine and talked with Baum, who, after some time, left the dune unscathed. When the operator left, Baum took the distributor cap so the machine would not start.⁣

As a result of this protest, an organization called The People to Preserve Jockey’s Ridge was formed which led to the dune and surrounding area becoming Jockey's Ridge State park.
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ConDev681
From the Conservation and Development Photo File, State Archives of NC.

Main Street in Littleton, NC is seen here in 1909. ⁣⁣We’re highlighting Halifax County today as a part of our newest dep...
04/15/2020

Main Street in Littleton, NC is seen here in 1909. ⁣

We’re highlighting Halifax County today as a part of our newest departmental initiative, Hello NC, where we celebrate the people, culture, and stories of rural North Carolina.⁣⁣

Littleton, located in Halifax County, was incorporated in 1877, but has existed for much longer. The small town grew around a tavern dating back to 1739 called Person's Ordinary that was owned by State Legislator Thomas Person. ⁣

Person's nephew, William Little, inherited the Person plantation referred to as Little Manor and the town gained the name Littleton. ⁣

Ella Baker, Civil Rights leader and founder of (SNCC) Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, was raised in her grandmother's home in Littleton. ⁣
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N.97.12.189⁣
From the General Negative Collection, State Archives of NC.

Does your attic look like this? We bet that many of you are taking this time of home isolation to clean, organize and ta...
04/14/2020

Does your attic look like this?

We bet that many of you are taking this time of home isolation to clean, organize and take stock. If you have North Carolina related photographic material, audio recordings or motion picture film that you'd like to donate, we'd love to hear from you! ⁣

The donors of material to the State Archives of NC hold a great honor in helping to preserve history along with educating the public and enriching the cultural heritage of our state.

Contact us through Facebook or our contact info listed in the link below if you'd like to talk! ⁣

https://archives.ncdcr.gov/researchers/collections/audiovisual-materials
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N.53.16.4612⁣
From the Albert Barden Collection, State Archives of NC.

April 22, 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day 🌎. Since 1970, Earth Day has increased awareness of the planet we...
04/13/2020

April 22, 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day 🌎. Since 1970, Earth Day has increased awareness of the planet we live on.

Join us as we countdown to #EarthDay with a photo challenge. Use this guide to post a picture a day until Earth Day.

Tag us and use #NCEarthDay50. We can’t wait to see your photos!

Raleigh’s first water tower is seen just after completion, at about 2 pm, 13 September 1887. Prior to the construction o...
04/09/2020

Raleigh’s first water tower is seen just after completion, at about 2 pm, 13 September 1887. Prior to the construction of this tower and Raleigh’s municipal water system, residents of the city got their water just like everyone else—from wells. Some fancier homes had well-supplied cisterns located in towers, attics or rooftops to store and create water pressure for indoor plumbing—if you were fortunate enough to have it.

The News and Observer reported on the event seen here with an article titled, “A Pleasant Little Aerial Excursion” in which a handful of lucky citizens got a chance to tour the newly completed tower. The highlight was the balcony—only completed days before.

The article stated, “The winding stairs, over one hundred feet, were counted without a halt, though to some it seemed as if there was no top anywhere. After reaching the top however all exertion was amply repaid by the splendid view from the balcony.”

And what about the two pendulous individuals suspended from the hoist seen above the crowd? The article goes on to explain, “Some of the gentlemen disdained the labor of climbing the stairs and had themselves drawn up on the outside by rope and block, and came down the same way. That was easy, but it didn’t look secure to the observer to see a man dangling in mid-air over one hundred feet from the ground, and but a few adopted that plan.”

This photograph was taken close to the intersection of Hillsborough and McDowell Street by T. C. Harris, an employee of the State Museum.
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N.66.4.85
From the General Negative Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.

Photographer Bayard Wootten is seen here c. 1909, knee deep in Great Lake located within Croatan National Forest. ⁣On th...
04/06/2020

Photographer Bayard Wootten is seen here c. 1909, knee deep in Great Lake located within Croatan National Forest. ⁣On this day in 1959 she passed away in New Bern.

Wootten was a pioneer in photography and an outspoken suffragette. She was one of the first female aerial photographers when, in 1914, took photographs from a Wright Brothers Model B airplane. Also a competent painter, she is credited with designing the first trademarked logo for Pepsi-Cola. ⁣

Wootten was adventurous and unflinching in all aspects of her life, especially business. She owned several photography studios and was known to set out on solo trips across the state in her 1920s Ford to photograph North Carolina’s people and landscapes. She continued to photograph well into her 70s and operated her photo studio in Chapel Hill until 1954. ⁣
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PhC42_Bx16_Great Lake_F1-2⁣
From the H. H. Brimley Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.

In 1906 best friends, Nettie and Fannie were just too far apart from one another. They decided to attend different colle...
04/03/2020

In 1906 best friends, Nettie and Fannie were just too far apart from one another. They decided to attend different colleges, Nettie at Wake Forest and Fannie at Baptist College for Women (now Meredith College). The warm banter seen in their postcard correspondence is clearly evident here. This postcard from Nettie reads, "Hello, Fanny dear! I'm at this dear old place, Don't you wish you were here? Ask Neil if he remembers this old scene and especially one place on the campus. Will write you real soon, lovingly, Nettie."

Fannie Wilson was a life-long resident of Warsaw, NC. After completing her education at Baptist College, she returned to Warsaw and eventually accepted employment with the US Postal Service, working at the Warsaw Post Office for over 30 years. Miss Wilson was active in her church and community until her death at age 93 in 1974.

In this age of instant communication via email, text and video chat, it's easy to forget distances. In 1906, Nettie and Fannie had to wait days to hear from one another, This made receiving replies all the more joyful. While we have some time on our hands, why not send a postcard to a friend or pen-pal?
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PhC.4.1.14
From the Fannie Wilson Photograph Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.
#archiveshashtagparty #penpals

J. T. Wyatt and his wife, Mary were all about granite. The Wyatt’s operated a large granite quarry near Faith, NC for ma...
04/02/2020

J. T. Wyatt and his wife, Mary were all about granite. The Wyatt’s operated a large granite quarry near Faith, NC for many years. Their products included mill stones, granite curbing, building stones, and engine beds. Many of the existing granite curb stones in Asheville, Raleigh and Charlotte were supplied by J. T. Wyatt and a few of their engine beds made it as far west as San Francisco—being installed in the post office there.

J. T.’s wife, Mary, was apparently quite the businesswoman. In 1903 she traveled to Raleigh to meet with Southern Railway about the company’s lack of rail cars. She spoke to the News and Observer stating, “I’ve got sixteen car loads of granite and no cars. I want a place on the Seaboard so if one rail won’t furnish low rates the other will. I’ve got 120 people working at Faith and I must keep them busy and need cars to move granite.”

She basically played one railroad off of the other. Needless to say, she succeeded in getting her cars.
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PhC_42_ovsizebx7_1
From the H. H. Brimley Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.

Carolina Power and Light workers are seen in Raleigh with one of the company’s first motorized service vehicles c. 1910....
04/01/2020

Carolina Power and Light workers are seen in Raleigh with one of the company’s first motorized service vehicles c. 1910. Naturally, the truck was electrically powered.

During the early days of automobiles, electric vehicles were much more common than many people realize. Before other engine technologies had advanced, electric cars had many advantages—mainly simplicity. Gasoline and steam powered vehicles were difficult to start, maintain and drive. An electric powered vehicle during this time required very little maintenance, they were easy to start and easy to drive--no spark advance, no gear shifting, no hand crank.

This simplicity and ease of use made marketing electric vehicles to women drivers irresistible. As a result, electric vehicles slowly gained a reputation as being women's cars. To counter this, manufacturers began to install false radiator grills to make the cars appear to be gasoline powered.

Unfortunately for electric vehicle manufacturers, a false radiator was no match for what Henry Ford had coming. His mass production of improved gasoline engines made his vehicles considerably cheaper to purchase and electric vehicle sales dwindled. Electric cars eventually disappeared from roads almost entirely until their relatively recent resurgence.
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N.53.16.6486
From the Albert Barden Collection, State Archives; Raleigh, NC.

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Comments

Would you all have any of jack and Herbert Barnett?
R.J. Reynolds & his lovely looking Wife Katharine Smith Reynolds ! 1905-1918 . Winston Salem !
This is what that House in Oxford looks like now !
My colleague Fran Tracy-Walls, Manuscripts Archivist in Special Collections Section, State Archives of NC, has a new page dedicated to Private Manuscript Collections at the State Archives - check it out!!!!
Will you be open on Tuesday July 4th?
I have been waiting for pay records of HMS Windsor, the ship on which served Edward "Blackbeard" Thache. Finally, I received them and was rewarded yet again with the most delightful news! The record that originally told me of his service on Windsor was a deed of his father's inheritance to his step-mother Lucretia, dated December 10, 1706. His father was buried in Spanish Town, Jamaica on November 16, 1706. Fortunately, Windsor was back at Jamaica by then. http://bcbrooks.blogspot.com/2017/06/eureka-blackbeard-on-hms-windsor.html Books: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/bcbrooks baylusbrooks.com
Does anyone have any pictures or newspaper articles or anything from a place called "Sharpe's Formal Wear"??? My grandfather and grandmother opened/owned a few of the stores, and the one on Hillsborough St. still has the company's name on the hanging blue thing over the door! Pretty neat. So I want to find pictures of anything really to show the family! Can't remember the opening or closing dates or where the other stores were located but I know they did really good financially.. If anyone comes across any items, PLEASE SHARE THEM WITH ME! Thanks!!
Skip Elsheimer is the driving force behind Home Movie Day and the N&O's Tar Heel of the Week!!! Thank you, Skip, for everything you do for the State Archives of North Carolina AV Materials Unit!!!