Berks County Coroner’s Office

Berks County Coroner’s Office The goal of the Coroner’s Office is to provide the citizens of Berks County with thorough, complete and professional investigations. til 5:30 P.M.

The Coroner’s Office is staffed 24/7, 365 days a year. For copies of reports, please contact the office and ask to speak with the Open Records Officer. For general business, normal hours are from 7:30 A.M. Outside of these hours, please contact the on-duty deputy for help and information.

The Berks County Coroner’s Office is seeking assistance to identify a man who’s body was found in the 600 block of Chest...
01/11/2024

The Berks County Coroner’s Office is seeking assistance to identify a man who’s body was found in the 600 block of Chestnut Street Reading in the area of the Railroad tracks on January 11, 2024. The Hispanic male is believed to be between the age of 20–30-years-old, 5’6 inches tall, and approximately 130 pounds. He was wearing a gray and navy-blue sweatshirt, grey Champion sweatpants, orange and white Nike Air size 10.5. The male has brown eyes, short brown hair, a mustache with a small goatee.

Please take a moment to look at these photographs. If you recognize these tattoo’s, please contact our office. Everyone counts, and we are hopeful that with the public’s help, we can regain this young man’s identity.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Berks County Coroner’s Office at 610-478-3280

👮‍♂️👮‍♀️Today is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day On this day, we take time to express our gratitude, respect, ...
01/09/2024

👮‍♂️👮‍♀️Today is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day

On this day, we take time to express our gratitude, respect, and admiration for those who selflessly and bravely risk their lives to protect and serve our communities. These men and women have answered a call to public service that is demanding and often unappreciated. Rarely do they know what their days have in store for them. On National Law Enforcement Day, we have an opportunity to thank them for their service and offer a token of respect.

~The Berks County Coroner’s Office would like to say Thank You to all of Law Enforcement for all you do every day. We appreciate you! 🚓

~ May your Christmas be blessed with the lasting gifts of love and friendship. We know that the holiday season can be a ...
12/25/2023

~ May your Christmas be blessed with the lasting gifts of love and friendship.

We know that the holiday season can be a particularly difficult time for those who have lost a loved one. How you choose to remember your loved one – whether privately or with family and friends around – should treasure their memory and help you to feel some joy this festive season.

The entire staff of the Berks County Coroner’s Office wishes everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!
11/23/2023

The entire staff of the Berks County Coroner’s Office wishes everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!

During the first week of October, K-9 R***r and his handler Asst. Chief Debra Detweiler attended and completed an intens...
10/15/2023

During the first week of October, K-9 R***r and his handler Asst. Chief Debra Detweiler attended and completed an intense 40 hours of HRD (Human Remains Detection) training at the Old Dominion K-9 & Sumner County EMA Fall Seminar in Appomattox, Virginia.
K-9 R***r and Asst. Chief Detweiler are currently working toward their certification in HRD with the North American Police Work Dog Association. Once certified, R***r and his handler may be called to assist on crime scenes, unsolved missing person cases, and natural or man-made disaster events.

R***r showed tenacity and determination during his demanding training and is looking forward to assisting local and state Law Enforcement and the families and visitors of Berks County.

08/31/2023

CDC Marks International Overdose Awareness Day each year on August 31st

It’s back to school time for our local schools and even some of our staff! 📚🤓 Three members of the BC Coroner’s Office h...
08/29/2023

It’s back to school time for our local schools and even some of our staff! 📚🤓
Three members of the BC Coroner’s Office headed out to St. Louis, Missouri for the Medicolegal Death Investigator Training Course.

This course will help prepare these gentleman as they work toward obtaining their American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigator (ABMDI) certification. 🩺⚖️

ABMDI is a professional certification earned by individuals who have demonstrated their mastery of investigational techniques and who have successfully completed rigorous examination of their knowledge and skills in the field of medicolegal death investigation.

Currently Assistant Chief Deputy Deb Detweiler, Deputy Sarah Shivers and Deputy Todd Kegerise hold this certification.

📷 Pictured are Chief Deputy George Holmes, Deputy Jason Kantner, Deputy Joseph Pothering.

This past week several members of our staff attended the New England Seminar in Forensic Sciences at Colby University. O...
07/29/2023

This past week several members of our staff attended the New England Seminar in Forensic Sciences at Colby University. Our staff was able to gain an in-depth understanding of current standard practices in the medical examiner/coroner and death investigations by distinguished instructors from across the country. Training refreshers are essential in this career and are required for the continuing education credits.

Pictured are Chief George Holmes, Asst. Chief Deb Detweiler, Deputy Sarah Shivers and Deputy Eric Graeff.

The past two weeks have been busy. One of our Assistant Chief Deputies had the opportunity to attend training at the Uni...
06/10/2023

The past two weeks have been busy. One of our Assistant Chief Deputies had the opportunity to attend training at the University of Tennessee - Forensic Anthropology Center. This course provided insight and education on thousands of different bones, both human and animal, from around the world!

While two Deputies had the opportunity to attend training at the University of Texas ~ Forensic Anthropology Center. This course provided insight
to practical knowledge and experience identifying, recording, and recovering scattered and buried human remains.

As summer kicks into gear and our Berks County residents and visitors are out exploring our beautiful county, we know those explorations may lead to some intriguing findings such as bones. Our office is able to help with determining the difference in human and animal bones along with recovery should the need arise.

The training and education is vital to keeping our staff well education in order to assit Law Enforcement and the residents and visitors of Berks County.

So go explore!! And let us know (through local law enforcement) if you find anything interesting! 😳

We wanted to thank everyone to took the time to  vote for R***r for the Aftermath Cares K-9 Grant. Although we did not w...
06/09/2023

We wanted to thank everyone to took the time to vote for R***r for the Aftermath Cares K-9 Grant. Although we did not win, we wish all the best to the other K-9 teams.

For further information on the winners you can go to

https://www.aftermath.com/k9-grant

Who Was the Man Found Frozen in Appalachian Trail Cave in 1977?The Berks County Coroner’s Office in conjunction with Pen...
06/06/2023

Who Was the Man Found Frozen in Appalachian Trail Cave in 1977?

The Berks County Coroner’s Office in conjunction with Pennsylvania State Police are asking for your help with solving a chilling mystery that’s about as cold as a case can get. Let us take you back in time to January 16, 1977, to when the body of a young man was found frozen in a cave just below The Pinnacle off the Appalachian Trail in Albany Township, Berks County.

46 years ago, in mid-winter at approximately 3 pm two young hikers discovered the man’s body. The two had stepped into a very small cave to duck out of some weather. Little did they know that they would find a deceased human being. I would think it was a pretty eerie and an unsettling discovery. One can imagine it was probably quit the desolate place back then.

January 1977 was and remains one of the coldest months in eastern Pennsylvania. January was particularly brutal, making it the coldest month on record. With a high of only 8 degrees that month and a low temperature of 4 below zero. The bitter temperatures led to dangerous power outages. But the misery of that arctic winter didn’t stop with the frigid temperatures. Snow totals during the winter reached 49 inches.

Excerpts from a newspaper during that time describe that the body of the white male about 23 to 28 years old, was discovered in a frozen state. According to a Jan. 16, 1977, article published in The Reading Eagle authorities included with the post, there were no obvious signs of foul play observed and police at the time believed “the man could have succumbed due to the cold weather.”

What the man was doing in the area at that time of year is also a mystery, as he had no hiking gear with him, although authorities speculated at the time that it could have been left outside the cave and covered by snow which had fallen.

This scenic outlook is located several miles west of Kempton in a corner of the county that borders both Schuylkill and Lehigh Counties The cave where the man was found is only accessible by foot, meaning someone may have seen him hiking there.

The man is better described by police as white, 25 to 35 years old, with blue eyes and reddish curly long hair. At the time of his death, he had a full beard and a T-shaped scar on the left side of his chin, and he was wearing or had in his possession the following items:

• A dark brown suede/buckskin jacket with tassels on the sleeves and torso (size 38)
• Faded blue jeans (Wrangler brand, size 30×34)
• A brown leather belt
• A brown, knit turtleneck sweater (labeled Jules Pilch-Doylestown/Hatboro, size medium)
• A long winter undershirt and pants (size small, military issue with laundry mark B-0654)
• Two pairs of socks (one black, the other wool)
• Ankle-length brown leather hiking boots with black Vibran soles (size 10-10.5)
• Leather gloves
• Sunglasses

The man stood 5’10 - 5’11 and weighed 155 pounds at the time of his death.

The man was also wearing a 14-karat white gold ring inset with a blue stone, and his pockets contained a comb, pen, pencil, matches and $1.78.

An autopsy was conducted on January 17, 1977, at the Reading Hospital. The autopsy did not specify the amount of time since the death. The cause of death was listed as an overdose of Phenabarbital and Panabarbatal. The manner was listed as su***de. Since there was no one to claim this man, he was buried in Potter’s Field on 1/29/1977.

From this point this is where the case grows cold. 42 years cold until April 2019 when it was learned that there were two possible matches in the database. Over the course of time there had been a few inquiries of possible matches through the The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUS) data base however they all were determined to not be a match.

In 2007 the Unidentified Persons database launched. In 2008 the missing persons database launched. In 2009 both databases connected for automatic case comparison. “Pinnacle Man” was officially entered into The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) data base in August 2009, which is what prompted the two potential matches of men who disappeared from the states of Florida and Illinois.

The “Pinnacle Man’s” fingerprints were taken, but the original copy of those prints could not be found, and the quality of the copies was too poor to be used for identification.

On August 5, 2019, Exhumation occurred at the Potter’s Field. He was then taken to the Reading Hospital where he was examined by a Forensic Anthropologist, Forensic Pathologist and a Forensic Odontologist. A full forensic dental exam was completed to update the NamUS record, and then samples were shipped to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification where we hoped they could extract DNA for identification.
“Pinnacle Man” would then sit and wait for his turn in Texas for a little over two years until May of 2021 when our office was contacted by the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification, and we were sadly informed that the analyses were attempted but unfortunately the samples did not render any results. Our office offered to send additional samples and we were advised that they would not be able to do further testing on the samples for his case due to the backlog of cases.

In July of 2021 we received the samples that had been sent and they were reunite with the rest of the remains. The “Pinnacle Man” would then be stored in the evidence room.

In October 2021 Our office reached out again to inquire if there had been any changes and/or availability to re-submit samples. Sadly, we were informed that they were unable to do any additional work on this case due to the loss of their contract with NamUS.

In October 2021 our office reached out direct to NamUS and were informed that the NamUS had moved to a new facility and were currently in the process of making preparation to processing samples however there would be no acceptance of any sample prior to January 2022.

Fast Forward to the year 2022 samples were mailed to Bode Technology in November 2022 in hopes to find the answer as to who the “Pinnacle Man” is. Testing results have not been received yet.

There have been many speculations over the years of who this mystery man is from being of the Amish community, to someone in the military to a lost wondering sole yet the fact remains after 46 years we still do not know who this man is. It is a very sad mystery and one we would like to see solved.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to contact the Berks County Coroner’s Office at 610-478-3280 or Trooper Keck with the Pennsylvania State Police at Reading at 610-378-4011.

https://www.doenetwork.org/

https://namus.nij.ojp.gov/

🐾🐾 For those of you that don’t know R***r 🐶 R***r is not just a dog he is a representative of the Berks County Coroner’s...
05/30/2023

🐾🐾 For those of you that don’t know R***r 🐶

R***r is not just a dog he is a representative of the Berks County Coroner’s Office. His role is a little different than most but just as important. He is currently in training for Human Remains Detection (HRD) A.K.A. Cadaver work to assist Law Enforcement and the citizens of Berks County.

This is an easy way for you to help our office out.

Voting is open until June 5th. You can vote multiple ways every day. Share with your friends and Family

See details below ~ Clink in the Photo ☑️

Reading, PA

~ WE NEED YOUR HELP ~K-9 R***r has been entered into a contest to win a grant from Aftermath Cares. This grant is public...
05/25/2023

~ WE NEED YOUR HELP ~

K-9 R***r has been entered into a contest to win a grant from Aftermath Cares. This grant is public based and requires the public to vote for our agency to win.

The K-9 with the most votes between today and June 5th will receive grant money to go towards bettering the K-9 Unit. The more votes, the better chance we have to win.

~Please click the link and VOTE for Berks County Coroner's Office. You can
vote up to 3 times EVERY DAY by taking the following steps:

1. Visit https://www.aftermath.com/k9-grant, find this picture of K-9 R***r &
click to vote.

2. Visit the Aftermath Cares page, like their daily post & comment.
"Berks County Coroner's Office, Reading, Pa."

3. Follow on Instagram & comment "Berks County
Coroner's Office, Reading, Pa." on their daily post.

Share this post & ask your friends to vote!

Reading, PA

Over the course of the next 11 weeks our office will be sharing the details of our Unidentified cases. Next week we will...
05/24/2023

Over the course of the next 11 weeks our office will be sharing the details of our Unidentified cases. Next week we will be sharing our oldest case from 1977, “Pinnacle Man.” Be sure to check back next week for details.

Below is the newspaper article from the Reading Eagle that was published on May 22, 2023

Berks coroner tries again to put a name to man found frozen in a cave 45 years ago.

Unidentified remains of a man found at the Pinnacle in 1977 are being tested for DNA at a lab in the hopes of finally putting a name to the man.

By STEVEN HENSHAW | [email protected] | Reading Eagle
May 22, 2023 at 5:15 a.m.

It’s not figurative to say there are skeletons in the Berks County coroner’s office. John Fielding said he was surprised to learn early in 2022 after being elected coroner that there were human remains — mostly boxes of unclaimed cremated remains but also some partial skeletal remains and even a full skeleton — in a storage room office suite in Bern Township.

The full skeletal remains belong to a John Doe otherwise referred to as “Pinnacle Man. ”The man’s frozen body was found Jan. 16, 1977, in a cave at the Pinnacle, a popular vista along the Appalachian Trail in Albany Township, by two Bethlehem teens who were hiking.

The man, who was believed to be 25 to 30 years old when he died, is one of 11 unidentified human remains in the custody of the coroner’s office. Five of them, including part of a skull found in a pond last year in Amity Township, are kept in the coroner’s office because they contain no flesh. The others are interred in crypts in cemeteries in the county.

Fielding said he doesn’t believe anyone would be OK with their remains stored in a closet in the coroner’s office indefinitely, so he asked his staff what was being done about the matter.

“We just don’t think it’s right,” he said when asked why the office was concerned about identifying bones that have been in storage for as long as 45 years. “They shouldn’t be here. They should be with somebody who knows them.”

Difficult process

Step by step, Fielding’s staff has been working to find answers for the boxes of identified-but-unclaimed remains as well as skeletal remains of unidentified people.

But it’s easier said than done.
The office has been working with Charles Evans Cemetery in Reading to find dignified spaces to store the unclaimed ashes of identified descendants, Fielding said.

In October, the coroner’s office, working with the Adalyn Rose Foundation, which provides support services to parents who have suffered infant loss, had seven infant cremains interred in a niche of the cemetery’s columbarium following a multidenominational ceremony.

The infant cremains represented a fraction of the 181 sets of unclaimed cremated remains held at the coroner’s office at the time.

Cremating the skeletal remains is problematic, Deputy Coroner Joel Bonilla explained. First, the bones hold the key to their eventual identification through DNA analysis.

“With ‘Pinnacle Man,’ for example, he’s an unidentified person,” Bonilla said. “We have his skeleton still with us, and we can’t really cremate him because we don’t know who he is, and once we cremate him there’s no chance of extrapolating anything.”
Secondly, by law, the coroner’s office is required to use all reasonable efforts to identify decedents. Once the remains are identified, the coroner’s office can try to contact the next of kin and ask what they want done with the remains.

There’s renewed hope of putting names to remains with the help of internet databases such as the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, or NaMUS (pronounced “name us”), which was launched in 2009 to maximize the use of DNA technology to match unidentified remains with the profiles of known missing individuals.

Successful case

That’s what transpired in 2014 with the remains of two previously unidentified female teen murder victims in unmarked graves in the county’s “potter’s field” burial site in Cumru Township.

A year earlier, then-Coroner Dennis J. Hess got a county judge to sign an order for the exhumation of two adjacent graves of Jane Does.

The burial ground on Cedar Top Road in Cumru Township was once part of the old Berks County Almshouse estate. The almshouse was razed in 1957 after the opening of Berks Heim, the county-run nursing home in Bern Township.

Hess brought in a renowned expert in forensic exhumations at the request of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and a Pennsylvania State Police cold case investigator.

The missing children network made the request after persistent efforts by Hazel Stiver, whose sister, Sandra, ran away at age 14 from their Philadelphia home in 1968 with her brother’s 17-year-old wife, Martha. The Stiver family had long before relocated to Ohio without knowing what happened to Sandra and Martha.
Around 2000, Hazel discovered on the Doe Network, a nonprofit that has operated a missing person site since 1999, that the remains of two unidentified female murder victims were found a few miles apart in wooded areas in southeastern Berks a few months apart in 1968 and 1969 and were buried in the potter’s field. She suspected those graves held the remains of Sandra and Martha, and DNA analysis confirmed her suspicion more than a decade later.

The families of both victims agreed to have the remains cremated. Samples of the remains were retained by state police for use in criminal prosecution if anyone is arrested for the crimes.

Rebuilding the case

About five years later the coroner’s office started with the same playbook to identify “Pinnacle Man,” a process that was set back a few years due to a disruption in funding.

The contemporary attempt to identify the man using DNA technology has followed a long and twisting path.

In 2009, after NaMUS launched its public website, the coroner’s office was asked to upload the case files of its unidentified remains.
Although “Pinnacle Man’s” remains were buried in the potter’s field in 1977, he wasn’t initially on the coroner’s office radar. Someone brought to their attention that the long-buried man was still unidentified.

The problem, said Bonilla, a longtime deputy in the coroner’s office, was there was no case file to upload. “We had to reconstruct the case file because we knew he existed,” Bonilla said. “And now we had people telling us this guy in 1977 was never identified. We found the autopsy report and sort of rebuilt the case file.”

They uploaded the profile to NaMUS in 2009 with what limited information they had and started to get hits on missing people who matched his descriptors, though most were ruled out because they didn’t match his height, for example.

According to records, the man found in the cave was about 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighed about 155 pounds. The autopsy did not determine when he died but indicated the body was fairly well preserved.

Bonilla said a state police cold case investigator identified two potential matches, both men from other states who were in their early 20s when they went missing in 1975.

A forensic odontologist affiliated with NamUs, Dr. Richard Scanlon, compared the dental records of two missing men to “Pinnacle Man” and found several similarities but was unable to make a positive identification.

Although the dead man’s fingerprints were taken, the original copy of those prints could not be found and the quality of the copies was too poor to be used for identification.

State police and the coroner’s office began discussing exhumation around 2016. From their experience with the Stiver case, they knew what was involved, and it is not something to be taken lightly.
To get a court order for exhumation, the petitioner needs to make a good-faith attempt to contact the next of kin of the decedents buried in the adjacent graves, one on each side. That’s because there’s a chance of disturbing the wrong grave.

All the necessary steps were completed in 2019 and in July of that year, following a hearing, county Judge Jeffrey K. Sprecher approved the exhumation.

The coroner’s office shipped bone samples to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification for DNA testing to determine if there was a match to either of the missing men. The CHI Forensic Unit provides screening and DNA testing services of biological evidence related to criminal investigation.

To the frustration of the coroner’s office, the plan never materialized. After languishing for two years on a waiting list behind more pressing cases, the lab abruptly shipped the remains back to Berks in 2021, saying it couldn’t do the DNA extraction because its funding grant had dried up.

Since “Pinnacle Man’s” death isn’t a criminal case — the 1977 autopsy ruled he died of a drug overdose — it was low on the pecking order of government-funded labs offering DNA testing, officials said.

Hess retired before his third term as coroner ended in 2021. Fielding was elected that November and his office was left with the decision on how to proceed with “Pinnacle Man.”

“So we decided to just go ahead and take it from our budget,” Chief Deputy Coroner George Holmes said. Last year, Holmes contacted Bode Technology, a private Virginia lab. Bode offers forensic genealogy, which uses traditional genealogy research with advanced DNA testing to help identify potential links to unknown profiles.

The county will pay about $11,000 for the work, which goes beyond what the Texas lab would have performed. Unused funds set aside for DNA testing in the 2022 budget were diverted to cover the expense.

Officials shipped the remains to the Virginia lab early this year and are awaiting the results.

Though the process is expensive, Holmes felt the coroner’s office had an obligation to identify the man after exhuming him, and hope to one day turn over his remains to a relative.

The fact that years have gone by since the man’s remains were exhumed and he is still unidentified illustrates the enormity of the task ahead in putting names to all of the unidentified.

But it’s a task worth undertaking, within budget limitations, Holmes said. That assessment is based in part, Holmes said, on his experience over the past 1½ years in the coroner’s office.
He shared that a relative of a deceased young man — who had been missing since 2015 until his remains were recovered two years ago in a wooded area in the Five Points area of Exeter Township — said he thought about him every day since he last saw him.

Realistically, Holmes said, the coroner’s office will only have the funds to be able to send away one set of remains a year for DNA testing and forensic analysis.

“We now have a new tool that’s available,” he said. “It’s expensive. but when we can we’re going to try to utilize it.”

Berks unidentified

The Berks County coroner’s office has uploaded 11 cases into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, with the following details:

• Jan. 16, 1977: The well-preserved body of a white man, 20 to 35 years old, is found in a cave near the Pinnacle, a scenic outlook along the Appalachian Trail in Albany Township.

• Aug. 5, 1986: The decomposing body of a white man, 45 to 60 years old, is found in the corner of the stage of the shuttered Astor Theater in downtown Reading.

• July 15, 1988: The skeletal remains of a Black woman in her 20s are found in a shallow grave in French Creek State Park with what appeared to be pieces of a plastic grocery bag.

• June 3, 1992: The particle skeletal remains of a white female, 25 to 40 years old, were unearthed by a farmer plowing a field in Virginville.

• Feb. 15, 1993: The body of a white male infant is found in a bathroom trash can in Kutztown.

• June 24, 1997: The decomposing body of a Black man in his 30s is found along the Schuylkill River at Old River Road in Robeson Township.

• Nov. 25, 1997: A Black man, 40 to 60 years old, is pronounced dead in St. Joseph Hospital after being found face down on a sidewalk in the 100 block of South Sixth Street in Reading.

• Sept. 25, 2000: The mummified body of a white or Hispanic woman, 25 to 40 years old, is found in a wooded area behind Eagle Distributing Co. in the 800 block of Laurel Street in Reading.

• Aug. 21, 2001: The decomposing body of a Black woman, 20 to 40 years old, is found stuffed inside a large heavy duty plastic bag about 20 feet from Quarry Road, about a half-mile from the Pennsylvania Turnpike, in Caernarvon Township.

• June 23, 2003: The body of a white man, 25 to 50 years old, is found floating in the Schuylkill River in Perry Township by two people tubing on the river.

• April 30, 2022: A young boy who was visiting family in Amity Township finds what he believes to be a turtle shell in the mud of a retention pond in the 100 block of Pine Lane. After washing it off, he discovers what he is holding is the top of a human skull.

For more information visit NamUS at https://namus.nij.ojp.gov/

If anyone has any information on any of these cases you can contact the Berks County Coroner's Office at 610-478-3280 or the Pennsylvania State Police Reading at 610-378-4011

🚑.               🚑   Happy EMS Week   🚑.              🚑This week, we pay special tribute to the brave men and women who ...
05/24/2023

🚑. 🚑 Happy EMS Week 🚑. 🚑

This week, we pay special tribute to the brave men and women who dedicate their lives to saving others.

You are all appreciated more than you know. Thank you for all you do. Stay safe out there!

Last week we participated in a drunken driving scenario for the students at the Brandywine High School. Thank you to the...
05/21/2023

Last week we participated in a drunken driving scenario for the students at the Brandywine High School. Thank you to the Topton Fire Company for organizing this and putting on a great demonstration.

📌 Family has been located!! Thank you to our community of followers for your help!! 📌——————————————————————-📣 Our office...
05/09/2023

📌 Family has been located!! Thank you to our community of followers for your help!! 📌
——————————————————————-
📣 Our office needs your help! 📣
We are looking for family of Carol Rynn from Reading, Pa.
Please share and help us get the word out!

57-year-old Carol Rynn was pronounced dead Monday at her residence in the 700 block of Franklin Street.

🐾🐾We couldn’t let the day go by without wishing our very own BCCO in training R***r and all the other Search and Rescue ...
05/01/2023

🐾🐾We couldn’t let the day go by without wishing our very own BCCO in training R***r and all the other Search and Rescue K9s out there a Happy International Search and Rescue Dog Day Today.

Here is just a few pictures of those organizations we have worked with and trained with.

~ Thank you all for your dedication and service.

This past week several of our staff members attended the PA Homicide Investigators Association Seminar in State College....
04/21/2023

This past week several of our staff members attended the PA Homicide Investigators Association Seminar in State College. This training was beneficial in the way it provided our staff additional knowledge, skills and tools when assisting law enforcement in homicide investigations.

Our staff had an excellent experience and are grateful to have heard from some amazing speakers from around the world.

Thank you to the PA Homicide Investigators Association for an opportunity to attend this rewarding and educational seminar!

📣 We are trying to locate family for Steven Gearhart. Please contact the BC Coroner’s Office with any information! 📲
04/15/2023

📣 We are trying to locate family for Steven Gearhart.
Please contact the BC Coroner’s Office with any information! 📲

63-year-old Steven Gerhart was found deceased in his Reading residence of natural causes.

04/15/2023

63-year-old Steven Gerhart was found deceased in his Reading residence of natural causes.

The staff of the BCCO would like to thank the men and women of the Berks County Department of Emergency Service for thei...
04/13/2023

The staff of the BCCO would like to thank the men and women of the Berks County Department of Emergency Service for their continued dedication to the residence, guests and first (and last) responders of Berks County!

The job you do everyday is extremely difficult to say the least. From the initial call, to getting help out promptly and accurately, to rarely knowing the outcome, you show us that it truly takes a special group of people to be is this career and care for people you’ve never met.

To this amazing group of people, we wish you all a very ✨Happy National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week!!✨ You are appreciated not just this week of recognition but every day of the year!! 🖤💛🖤

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1047 MacArthur Road
Reading, PA
19605

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