U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) http://usgs.gov — The USGS serves the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and property from nature.

That's not a turkey!? Nope, but it's an Asiatic Enigma Bee collected in Turkey. It is one of 9 species of Enigma Bees th...
11/28/2019

That's not a turkey!?

Nope, but it's an Asiatic Enigma Bee collected in Turkey. It is one of 9 species of Enigma Bees that occur from the Western portion of the Mediterranean to Central Asia.

Enigma bees are rare in collections, so there is much to be discovered within this group. Unlike the female pictured here, the males of this group have prominent white markings on their faces.

They are called Enigma bees because it has been so difficult to decide which other bees they are closely related to. The reason for this confusion lies in their tongues. Bees are classified into long- and short-tongued varieties. Frustratingly, this distinction does not always refer to the length of the tongue but to the details of the structure of the mouth parts.

Short-tongued bees have a small segmented structure that lies alongside the actual tongue, long-tongued bees have this structure much elongated seemingly sheathing the real tongue. The actual tongue in long-tongued bees has a stiff rod running along its length, presumably to strengthen it. Short-tongued bees lack this reinforcement.

The problem with Enigma bees is that they are related to long-tongued bees but have lost the long-tongue characteristics - no sheath, no rod. What's the reason they have reverted to an earlier version of bee mouthparts? They visit tiny, open flowers of the parsley family, which need no deep probing.

So there's some Turkey bee trivia on Turkey Day!

If you can't get enough information on bees, visit our Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab: http://ow.ly/l83u50xlBPZ

And follow us @USGSBIML on Instagram, Tumblr, and Flickr with stories for each public domain picture.

#USGS #BIML #science #bees #pollinators #conservation

11/27/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 6.0 - 41km NW of Platanos, Greece: PAGER - GREEN ShakeMap - V , DYFI? - VII, Time - 2019-11-27 07:23:42 UTC (2019-11-27 09:23:42 +02:00 at epicenter), Location: 35.727°N 23.267°E, Depth: 71.76 km (44.59 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

11/26/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 5.4 - 6km ESE of Blagaj, Bosnia and Herzegovina: PAGER - YELLOW ShakeMap - VII , DYFI? - VI, Time - 2019-11-26 09:19:26 UTC (2019-11-26 10:19:26 +01:00 at epicenter), Location: 43.242°N 17.962°E, Depth: 10.00 km (6.21 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

11/26/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 6.4 - 10km NW of Shijak, Albania: PAGER - YELLOW ShakeMap - VIII , DYFI? - IX, Time - 2019-11-26 02:54:10 UTC (2019-11-26 03:54:10 +01:00 at epicenter), Location: 41.421°N 19.484°E, Depth: 10.00 km (6.21 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

11/24/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 6.3 - 85km ESE of Adak, Alaska: PAGER - GREEN ShakeMap - V , DYFI? - III , Time - 2019-11-24 00:54:02 UTC (2019-11-23 12:54:02 -12:00 at epicenter), Location: 51.527°N 175.559°W, Depth: 25.06 km (15.57 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

11/21/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 6.1 - 31km ESE of Chaloem Phra Kiat, Thailand: PAGER - GREEN ShakeMap - VII , DYFI? - V, Time - 2019-11-20 23:50:44 UTC (2019-11-21 06:50:44 +07:00 at epicenter), Location: 19.451°N 101.345°E, Depth: 10.00 km (6.21 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

Opening the doors: More than one hundred people, ranging from middle school science student to local officials, fellow e...
11/20/2019

Opening the doors: More than one hundred people, ranging from middle school science student to local officials, fellow employees and of course lots of USGS retirees attended the recent Open Houses hosted by the Rolla and Denver National Geospatial Technical Operations Center offices in conjunction with National GIS Day on November 13.
The Open House was to commemorate the 10th Anniversary of the NGTOC officially becoming a joint office, with a common bond and mission but located at two different sites.
The Open House featured employee- manned historical survey and mapping equipment as well as stations displaying modern NGTOC products and services such as US Topo maps, historical map scans, Geographic Names, 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) progress, surface water data (NHD), The National Map Corps and even some geography related games. For NGTOC highlights of the past decade, see the “celebration announcement”: http://ow.ly/bn0m30pUYYD

Watch Live or on-line! Thursday Nov 21, 2019 7PM PST. 2019 November Public Lecture FlyerSea-Level Rise, Extreme Water Le...
11/20/2019

Watch Live or on-line! Thursday Nov 21, 2019 7PM PST. 2019 November Public Lecture Flyer

Sea-Level Rise, Extreme Water Levels, and Coastal Erosion ... How bad could it possibly be?

By Sean Vitousek, USGS Research Oceanographer

Sea-level rise represents an unprecedented civil engineering challenge.
Small amounts of sea-level rise can disproportionately increase the frequency of coastal flooding.
One-third to two-thirds of the beaches in Southern California may disappear by 2100 under sea-level rise of 1-2 meters.
A combination of satellite observations and modeling will help to understand and predict coastal change.

http://ow.ly/onhd50xdWPW

11/20/2019
earthquake.usgs.gov

Preliminary Event: M 6.3 - 111km SW of Puerto Madero, Mexico: PAGER - GREEN ShakeMap - IV , DYFI? - VI, Time - 2019-11-20 04:27:05 UTC (2019-11-19 22:27:05 -06:00 at epicenter), Location: 13.982°N 93.130°W, Depth: 10.97 km (6.82 mi)

The Earthquake Event Page application supports most recent browsers, view supported browsers. Or, try our Real-time Notifications, Feeds, and Web Services.

Earlier this year, the Trump Administration released a strategy for ensuring American access to the critical minerals th...
11/19/2019

Earlier this year, the Trump Administration released a strategy for ensuring American access to the critical minerals that we need for our economy and national security. Today, we’re taking an important step in that strategy with one of our closest and longest allies and partners for minerals, the country of Australia: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/united-states-and-australia-formalize-partnership-critical-minerals

Australia is richly endowed with minerals, and our partner agency, Geoscience Australia is a global leader in mineral mapping. We look forward to working with them and learning from them as we ensure the security of our mineral supply chains.

Image shows U.S. Geological Survey Director Jim Reilly (left) and Minister for Resources and Northern Australia Matt Canavan (photo credit, DOI Photographer Tami Heilemann) #USGS #Science #Australia #Minerals #CriticalMinerals

#WildlifeWednesdaySalmon and steelhead fisheries brought in around $90 million to Idaho in 2011. Mike Quist at the USGS ...
11/13/2019

#WildlifeWednesday

Salmon and steelhead fisheries brought in around $90 million to Idaho in 2011. Mike Quist at the USGS Idaho Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and an associate professor at the University of Idaho is studying steelhead trout in the Pacific Northwest.

Learn more. University of Idaho Podcast Episode 2.4 with Mike Quist, Trailing Steelhead. http://ow.ly/bdtx50x9NOZ

Image of steelhead trout (Credit: NMFS, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center).

#USGS #science #fisheries #trout #Idaho

Happy GIS Day! See how the @USGS National Geospatial Program supports critical products and services for Geographic Info...
11/13/2019

Happy GIS Day! See how the @USGS National Geospatial Program supports critical products and services for Geographic Information Systems and data users. The NGP provides a foundation of digital geospatial data representing the topography, natural landscape, and manmade environment of the United States. Customers can incorporate NGP geospatial products and services into their decision making and operational activities. NGP data and derived products and services can be accessed through The National Map Data download: http://ow.ly/kWSb30pSJ13

Seldom does a person have the opportunity to showcase their life’s work in a vivid and comprehensive way. We would like ...
11/13/2019

Seldom does a person have the opportunity to showcase their life’s work in a vivid and comprehensive way. We would like to highlight a rare exception -- one of USGS’s most prolific geologists and photographers, George Billingsley. Today, we roll out a new online map viewer of the Grand Canyon that includes a collection of 1,211 geotagged images George captured during his 43 years of geologic mapping from 1967 to 2010. The photographs document key geologic features, structures, and rock unit relations that were used to compile many of the geologic maps that were created for the Grand Canyon region over the past four decades. Each photograph contains a brief description, date the image was captured, its geographic coordinates, and falls into one of the following categories: arches and windows, breccia pipes and collapse structures, faults and folds, igneous rocks, landslides and rockfalls, metamorphic rocks, sedimentary rocks, sinkholes, or springs and waterfalls. It is one of the most robust and comprehensive geologic image collections we have at the USGS. And it would not be available, had it not been for George Billingsley and his camera. Enjoy!

General Information Product (GIP) 189 is available at https://www.usgs.gov/apps/grand-canyon-field-photos/

Celebrating 10 years! In October 2009, the NGTOC was established as one organization located in two locations, Rolla, MO...
11/12/2019

Celebrating 10 years! In October 2009, the NGTOC was established as one organization located in two locations, Rolla, MO and Denver, CO. The Center has been very successful in their role as the operational center supporting the USGS National Geospatial Program. To celebrate this anniversary, each office will host an Open House on November 13, 2019, which coincides with National GIS Day. List of accomplishments and other details: http://ow.ly/ip8y30pSr9W

This week USGS scientists are in three Florida counties, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach, leading experts in the semi...
11/08/2019

This week USGS scientists are in three Florida counties, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach, leading experts in the semi-annual Fish Slam, a scientific scavenger hunt for non-native freshwater fishes. Biologists and natural resource managers from USGS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and several universities and museums are working in teams to sample freshwater bodies using nets, traps, seines, hook and line, and electrofishing (which temporarily stun the fish so they are easier to catch). The two-day Fish Slam event helps monitor new non-natives and documents the possible expansion of known non-native fish species.
All non-native fishes collected during Fish Slams are recorded in the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database, and select specimens are preserved and sent to the Florida Museum, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Florida Atlantic University and other museums and academic institutes, where scientists use them for research purposes. Learn more about Fish Slam: http://ow.ly/c9wF50x5emH

Photos (USGS): One team’s varied catch of non-native fish found in South Florida waterways during a 2018 Fish Slam event. A Mayan cichlid collected in a 2019 Fish Slam event in Indian River and St. Lucie counties.

Happy Statehood Day to Montana! Montana was the 41st state to be admitted into the Union on November 8, 1889.You will fi...
11/08/2019

Happy Statehood Day to Montana! Montana was the 41st state to be admitted into the Union on November 8, 1889.

You will find our scientists throughout The Treasure State working on issues to provide natural resource managers the information and tools needed to conserve Montana’s fish and wildlife and their habitats, including the state's streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and groundwater.

For more on USGS science on fish, wildlife, and ecosystems in Montana visit: http://ow.ly/loys50x5cn3

For more on USGS science on Montana's water resources visit: http://ow.ly/Yccf50x5bYO

Image of fishermen and women enjoying the blue ribbon fishery of the Yellowstone River in the fall near Livingston, Montana (Courtesy of Robb Diehl, USGS).

#USGS #Montana #TheTreasureState #science #conservation #BigSkyCountry #Yellowstone #science

#WildlifeWednesday - Who are you?This is a Columbia torrent salamander. It is native to the headwaters streams of the No...
11/06/2019

#WildlifeWednesday - Who are you?

This is a Columbia torrent salamander. It is native to the headwaters streams of the Northwest-U.S. It is also thought to be very vulnerable to habitat change, which is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has has identified areas of pre-listing information needs for it and the Cascade torrent salamander.

USGS science helps managers understand species’ threats and survival requirements and informs strategies to minimize threats and promote species conservation.

In fact, cooperative research and conservation efforts can help stabilize species such as torrent salamanders to a point that federal listing can be avoided.

For more about how USGS science is providing information for torrent salamander conservation, visit http://ow.ly/Cv4H50x34lm

Image of a Columbia torrent salamander (Courtesy of Christopher Cousins, USGS).

#USGS #amphibians #conservation #science

11/05/2019
Herring River, MA – Wetland restoration

USGS Research Chemist Kevin Kroeger appears in an American Association for the Advancement of Science video highlighting USGS science conducted on the Herring River Estuary in Massachusetts. The video focuses on research being done on tidal wetlands and how restoration efforts on impaired wetlands could improve the important role these ecosystems play in carbon sequestration.

To watch the complete video, visit: http://ow.ly/LMYV50x2OGH.

#USGS #AAS @aaas #wetlands #coastalwetlands

A film by Impact Media Lab https://www.impactmedialab.com/ Produced by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) https://www.aaas.org Di...

#TriviaTuesday These are red sea urchins. They are thought to be among the longest living animals on Earth. How long can...
11/05/2019

#TriviaTuesday

These are red sea urchins. They are thought to be among the longest living animals on Earth. How long can they live? Scroll down to find out...
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Some red sea urchins are able to live to 100 years old, and some may reach 200 years! That means there may be some red sea urchins that are older than the USGS (created in 1879).

This is an image of two red sea urchins collected during the #HuntingBubbles research cruise led by the USGS and Schmidt Ocean Institute this past summer. For more visit http://ow.ly/2JBz50x2Bl6

#USGS #science #deepsea #sealife #oceans

Bat Buddies: It takes a village -- or shall we say, a colony -- to tackle the threat of white-nose syndrome in bats (htt...
10/31/2019

Bat Buddies: It takes a village -- or shall we say, a colony -- to tackle the threat of white-nose syndrome in bats (http://ow.ly/Qu1h50wTsLU). The USGS is part of an international coordinated response to WNS (https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org), which is led by our partners at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service .

#BatWeek #USGS #science #WildlifeDisease BatWeek

Image: A group of bats is called a colony. Here, an Indiana bat yawns in a cave. (Credit: R. Andrew King, USFWS)

We hope you've enjoyed #Batweek posts so far! As we celebrate #Halloween, we'd also like to share some spooky skeletons ...
10/31/2019

We hope you've enjoyed #Batweek posts so far! As we celebrate #Halloween, we'd also like to share some spooky skeletons too, and about as far away from bats as you can get-the ocean floor: http://ow.ly/JH4U50wXGxG

Our WaterWord for today is aragonite, a mineral that provides the building blocks of coral skeletons. Image shows a squat lobster on a bunch of white, Lophelia pertusa coral. Credit: Lophelia II 2012 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM

#USGS #Science #WordoftheDay #Halloween #Oceans #Coral #skeletons

Going to any cemeteries on this All-Hallows Eve? Favorite Headstones and Mapping: The USGS National Map Corps encourages...
10/31/2019

Going to any cemeteries on this All-Hallows Eve? Favorite Headstones and Mapping: The USGS National Map Corps encourages and leverages volunteer citizen scientists to update structure data to The National Map. To reward, recognize and motivate these participants, the program awards “virtual” badges for increasing levels of edits and submission. The crowd sourced program has had a select few citizen scientists who have exceeded the top award. To highlight those participants who have had a major project impact, TNM Corps has interviewed interested participants to get their story. Here is one that might fit the Halloween spirit. In the volunteer’s own words, from the handle “Cgibson”. See her story, a reprint from Halloween 2018: http://ow.ly/9ERG30pOnR2

#Bats facing white-nose syndrome need help, and the #USGS is using its scientific expertise to respond. A recent USGS st...
10/31/2019

#Bats facing white-nose syndrome need help, and the #USGS is using its scientific expertise to respond. A recent USGS study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of WNS, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times.

In natural environments, vaccines could be applied to bats in a jelly-like substance that they ingest as they groom themselves and each other. Learn more at http://ow.ly/jyQs50wTskg.

#BatWeek #science #WildlifeDisease BatWeek

Image: These little brown bats show signs of WNS. (Credit: Al Hicks, New York Department of Environmental Conservation)

Bats help local economies. During the summertime bats emerge from daytime roosts in caves, tunnels, mines, or bridges pr...
10/30/2019

Bats help local economies. During the summertime bats emerge from daytime roosts in caves, tunnels, mines, or bridges provide impressive viewing opportunities as tens of thousands to millions of bats leave their roosts to forage for insects. Their collective flight can draw thousands of spectators, create interpretive opportunities, and provide economic benefits to nearby communities.

NA Bat states that the emergence of Mexican free-tailed bats at Carlsbad Caverns or the Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, TX, bring thousands of visitors to these areas. Total annual visitation to view Mexican free-tailed bats at these and 15 other sites in the southwestern United States was over 242,000 visitors, and their visits were conservatively estimated to bring in $6.5 million per year to the local communities. #BatWeek #WildlifeWednesday Learn more about why bats are important at: http://ow.ly/5nZH50wTsfu.

Image: USGS and Virginia Tech scientists captured female northern long-eared bats and fitted them with tiny radio-transmitters and numbered armbands. The bats were then released and tracked to determine what roosts they were using. (Credit: Alex Silvis, USGS.)

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