USGS News: Energy

USGS News: Energy News about energy from the USGS. Click for more details.

This Page delivers the latest news from the USGS that are related to energy. This includes news releases and another USGS product called Science Features. This Page is provided so that you can receive USGS news for this topic through Facebook if you choose to rather than forcing you to go to our site. If you're already using Facebook regularly then we're just making it that much easier for you. Note: Comments are turned off at this time. You can also find this news topic on Google+.

Please note: On, or about, March 14th this account will be deactivated. We encourage you to follow the main U.S. Geologi...
03/07/2019
Social Media

Please note: On, or about, March 14th this account will be deactivated. We encourage you to follow the main U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), our other USGS accounts at (https://usgs.gov/socialmedia), or the USGS News: Everything We've Got (for only USGS news related updates). Thank you

The USGS has several social media presences. The sites listed below are those that are considered official USGS presences. Any site found that is not listed is considered a non-USGS presence. 

USGS Oil and Gas Resource Estimates Updated for the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): Summary: The U.S. Geolo...
01/20/2015
USGS Oil and Gas Resource Estimates Updated for the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA)

USGS Oil and Gas Resource Estimates Updated for the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA): Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey estimates 896 million barrels of conventional, undiscovered oil and 53 trillion cubic feet of conventional, undiscovered non-associated gas within NPRA and adjacent state waters. The estimated volume of undiscovered oil is significantly lower than in 2002, when the USGS estimated there was 10.6 billion barrels of oil. The new result, roughly 10% of the 2002 estimate, is due primarily to recent exploration drilling indicating gas occurrence rather than oil in much of NPRA. --- Contact Information: Dave Houseknecht ( Phone: 703-648-6466 ); Brenda Pierce ( Phone: 703-648-6421 ); Alex Demas ( Phone: 703-648-4421 ); --- The U.S. Geological Survey estimates 896 million barrels of conventional, undiscovered oil and 53 trillion cubic feet of conventional, undiscovered non-associated gas within NPRA and adjacent state waters. The estimated volume of undiscovered oil is significantly lower than in 2002, when the USGS estimated there was 10.6 billion barrels of oil. The new result, roughly 10% of the 2002 estimate, is due primarily to recent exploration drilling indicating gas occurrence rather than oil in much of NPRA. Related Podcasts Updated Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources in the National Petroleum Reserve in AK Download directly | Details or subscribe by e-mail. Recent activity in NPRA, including 3-D seismic surveys, Federal lease sales administered by the Bureau of Land Management, and drilling of more than 30 exploration wells in the area, provides geologic indicators that are more indicative of gas than oil. Many of the newly drilled wells show an abrupt transition from oil to gas just 15 to 20 miles west of the giant Alpine field, located just outside the northeastern boundary of NPRA. "These new findings underscore the challenge of predicting whether oil or gas will be found in frontier areas and the importance of analyzing the geologic characteristics and history of an area in order to understand the oil and gas resources,” explains USGS Director, Dr. Marcia McNutt. “As new data become available, it is important to re-evaluate the petroleum potential of an area in light of the new information." The new assessment also indicates 8 trillion cubic feet less gas than the 2002 USGS estimate of 61 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, conventional, non-associated gas. Conventional gas refers to gas in discrete accumulations, while non-associated means there is little to no crude oil in the reservoir. New geologic analysis by the USGS provides an explanation for the unanticipated predominance of gas in much of NPRA. It is likely that oil formed approximately 90 million years ago in many reservoirs in northern NPRA and gas in many reservoirs in southern NPRA. Subsequently, 15-60 million years ago, many parts of NPRA were uplifted and eroded, thereby changing the pressure conditions in the subsurface. In areas of modest uplift and erosion, gas that was dissolved in oil came out of solution, forming gas caps and displacing oil downward into poorer quality reservoir rocks. In areas where uplift and erosion were significant, the gas present in the subsurface expanded so much that it completely displaced oil from reservoirs. The variable nature of the uplift and erosion resulted in some reservoirs retaining their oil, but the majority of the reservoirs instead became gas bearing. NPRA has been the focus of significant oil exploration during the past decade, stimulated by the mid-1990’s discovery of the largest onshore oil discovery in the U.S. during the past 25 years, in the Alpine field. The estimates cited above are mean estimates of fully risked, undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources. The USGS conducted this assessment as part of a program directed at estimating the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources of priority petroleum basins in the United States. To learn more about this assessment, please visit the Energy Resources Program website. #energy #usgs

Summary: The U.S. Geological Survey estimates 896 million barrels of conventional, undiscovered oil and 53 trillion cubic feet of conventional, undiscovered non-associated gas within NPRA and adjacent state waters. The estimated volume of undiscovered oil is significantly lower than in 2002, when…

Natural Gas Potential Assessed in Eastern Mediterranean: Summary: An estimated 122 trillion cubic feet (tcf) (mean estim...
01/20/2015
Natural Gas Potential Assessed in Eastern Mediterranean

Natural Gas Potential Assessed in Eastern Mediterranean: Summary: An estimated 122 trillion cubic feet (tcf) (mean estimate) of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas are in the Levant Basin Province, located in the Eastern Mediterranean region --- Contact Information: Chris Schenk ( Phone: 303-236-5796 ); Jessica Robertson ( Phone: 703-648-6624 ); --- An estimated 122 trillion cubic feet (tcf) (mean estimate) of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas are in the Levant Basin Province, located in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Technically recoverable resources are those producible using currently available technology and industry practices. This is the first U.S. Geological Survey assessment of this basin to identify potentially extractable resources. “The Levant Basin Province is comparable to some of the other large provinces around the world and its gas resources are bigger than anything we have assessed in the United States,” said USGS Energy Resources Program Coordinator Brenda Pierce. “This assessment furthers our understanding of the world’s energy potential, helping inform policy and decision makers in making decisions about future energy supplies.” Natural gas is used for a variety of purposes, primarily for electricity generation, industrial, residential, and commercial sectors. Worldwide consumption and production of natural gas was 110 tcf in 2008, according to the Energy Information Administration. The three largest consuming countries were the United States with 23 tcf, Russia with 17 tcf, and Iran with 4 tcf of natural gas per year in 2008. Russia’s West Siberian Basin is another large natural gas province with an estimated 643 tcf. The Middle East and North Africa region also has several large provinces, which include the Rub Al Khali Basin with 426 tcf, the Greater Ghawar Uplift with 227 tcf, and the Zagros Fold Belt with 212 tcf. Some natural gas accumulations in the United States include the Southwestern Wyoming Province with an estimated 85 tcf, the National Petroleum Reserve Alaska Province with 73 tcf, and the Appalachian Basin Province of the eastern United States and the Western Gulf Basin Province of Texas and Louisiana, each with 70 tcf. All of these estimates are mean estimates of undiscovered, technically recoverable gas resources. The Levant Basin Province also holds an estimated 1.7 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil. Worldwide consumption of petroleum was about 31 billion barrels in 2008. The USGS conducted this assessment as part of a program directed at estimating the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources of priority petroleum basins around the world. To learn more about this assessment, please visit Fact Sheet 2010 - 3014 and the Energy Resources Program Web site. [Access images for this release at: <a href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/tags/NR2010_04_08" mce_href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/tags/NR2010_04_08">http://gallery.usgs.gov/tags/NR2010_04_08</a>] #energy #usgs

Summary: An estimated 122 trillion cubic feet (tcf) (mean estimate) of undiscovered, technically recoverable natural gas are in the Levant Basin Province, located in the Eastern Mediterranean region --- Contact Information: Chris Schenk ( Phone: 303-236-5796 ); Jessica Robertson ( Phone:…

USGS report details uranium resources and potential effects of uranium mining near Grand Canyon: Summary: As part of the...
01/20/2015
USGS report details uranium resources and potential effects of uranium mining near Grand Canyon

USGS report details uranium resources and potential effects of uranium mining near Grand Canyon: Summary: As part of the Department of the Interior’s evaluation of whether to segregate nearly 1 million acres of federal lands near the Grand Canyon from new uranium claims, the United States Geological Survey today released a report on uranium resources and uranium mining impacts in the area --- Contact Information: Andrea Alpine ( Phone: (928) 556-7094 or (650) 245-2400 ); Lara Schmit ( Phone: (928) 556-7327 or (928) 814-9688 ); --- Flagstaff, Ariz. — As part of the Department of the Interior’s evaluation of whether to segregate nearly 1 million acres of federal lands near the Grand Canyon from new uranium claims, the United States Geological Survey today released a report on uranium resources and uranium mining impacts in the area. The studies contained in the report looked at uranium found in breccia pipe deposits and explored the geological, hydrological, and biological issues related to uranium mining on Federal lands near the park. “The current two year time-out on new uranium mining claims gives us an opportunity to gather the best science and input from the public, Congress, stakeholders, and Tribes on whether to withdraw lands near the Grand Canyon from new mining claims for a longer period of time,” said Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar. “The USGS’s report and ongoing research will be helpful to a thoughtful consideration of how to best manage these areas.” On July 21, 2009, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced a decision to segregate nearly 1 million acres of federal lands in the Arizona Strip for two years while the Department evaluates whether to withdraw these lands from new mining claims for an additional 20 years. The lands, managed by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service, are within portions of the Grand Canyon watershed and contain significant environmental and cultural resources as well as substantial uranium deposits. U.S. Geological Survey scientists were tasked to conduct a series of short-term studies on the possible effects of uranium mining on the region’s natural resources. The report’s key findings follow: * The area proposed for withdrawal is estimated to contain about 163,000 tons (about 326 million pounds) of uranium oxide (U3O8), which is about 12 percent of the estimated total undiscovered uranium in northern Arizona (1.3 million tons or 2.6 billion pounds). * Soil and sediment samples were analyzed for six sites that experienced various levels of uranium mining in Kanab Creek area north of Grand Canyon National Park, including mined and reclaimed sites, mined sites currently on standby, and sites that were exploratory drilled but not mined. Uranium and arsenic were two elements consistently detected in the areas disturbed by mining in values above natural background levels. * Analysis of historical water-quality data for more than 1,000 water samples from 428 sites in northern Arizona shows that dissolved uranium concentrations in areas without mining were generally similar to those with active or reclaimed mines. Sixty-six percent of the sampled sites showed low dissolved uranium concentrations (less than 5 parts per billion). Ninety-five percent of the sampled sites had dissolved uranium levels of less than 30 parts per billion, the Environmental Protection Agency maximum for drinking water. * Samples from 15 springs and 5 wells exhibited dissolved uranium concentrations greater than the Environmental Protection Agency maximum for drinking water. These springs and wells are close to or in direct contact with mineralized ore bodies, and concentration levels are related to natural processes, mining, or a combination of both factors. * Almost 100 plants and animals identified by the State of Arizona or other land managers as species of concern inhabit the area proposed for withdrawal. Because uranium and its byproducts such as radon can affect survival, growth, and reproduction of plants and animals, USGS scientists identified exposure pathways (for example, ingestion or inhalation) for these species of concern. “The research efforts undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey will help decision makers better understand how uranium and uranium mining influence the water, soil, and wildlife of the lands surrounding Grand Canyon National Park,” said Andrea Alpine, Director of the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center. A USGS report evaluating uranium resources and summarizing findings about the possible effects of uranium mining in northern Arizona is available online. #energy #usgs

Summary: As part of the Department of the Interior’s evaluation of whether to segregate nearly 1 million acres of federal lands near the Grand Canyon from new uranium claims, the United States Geological Survey today released a report on uranium resources and uranium mining impacts in the area ---…

Significant Gas Resource Discovered in U.S. Gulf of Mexico: Summary: The U.S. Gulf of Mexico contains very thick and con...
01/20/2015
Significant Gas Resource Discovered in U.S. Gulf of Mexico

Significant Gas Resource Discovered in U.S. Gulf of Mexico: Summary: The U.S. Gulf of Mexico contains very thick and concentrated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoir rocks which have the potential to produce gas using current technology. --- Contact Information: Brenda Pierce ( Phone: 703-648-6421 ); Timothy Collett ( Phone: 720-936-2372 ); Clarice Ransom ( Phone: 703-648-4299 ); --- The U.S. Gulf of Mexico contains very thick and concentrated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoir rocks which have the potential to produce gas using current technology. Recent drilling by a government and industry consortium confirm that the Gulf of Mexico is the first offshore area in the United States with enough information to identify gas hydrate energy resource targets with potential for gas production. Gas hydrate, a substance comprised of natural gas and water, is thought to exist in great abundance in nature and has the potential to be a significant new energy source to meet future energy needs. However, prior to this expedition, there was little documentation that gas hydrate occurred in resource-quality accumulations in the marine environment. “This is an exciting discovery because for the first time in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, we were able to predict hydrate accumulations before drilling, and we discovered thick, gas hydrate-saturated sands that actually represent energy targets,” said U.S. Geological Survey Energy Program Coordinator Brenda Pierce. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) and a group of U.S. and international energy industry companies under the management of Chevron were responsible for conducting this first ever drilling project with the goal to collect geologic data on gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. “We have also found gas hydrate in a range of settings, including sand reservoirs, thick sequences of fracture-filling gas hydrates in shales, and potential partially saturated gas hydrates in younger systems,” said USGS Scientist Timothy Collett. “These sites should provide a wealth of opportunities for further study and data collection that should provide significant advances in understanding the nature and development of gas hydrate systems.” The most important technical accomplishments include: * The collection of a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data through expected hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in seven wells at three locations in the Gulf of Mexico. * LWD sensors provided unprecedented information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. * The expedition discovered gas hydrate in both sand and fracture dominated reservoirs. * The discovery of thick gas-hydrate-bearing sands validates the pre-drilling integrated geological and geophysical approach used to identify the targets and provides increased confidence in assessing the energy resource potential of marine gas hydrates. * In the case of the Walker Ridge and Green Canyon drill sites gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs between 50 and 100 ft thick were discovered. * The discovery of concentrated gas hydrates in sand reservoirs has made Walker Ridge and Green Canyon prime locations for future research drilling, coring, and production testing. Field operations during this expedition were also supported by AOA Geophysics, the Borehole Research Group at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Schlumberger, and the crew of the Helix Q4000 drilling vessel. To learn more about USGS research on natural gas hydrates, please visit the USGS Energy Resources web site. To learn more about gas hydrate research in the Gulf of Mexico and the results of this expedition, please visit the National Methane Hydrates R&D web site. #energy #usgs

Summary: The U.S. Gulf of Mexico contains very thick and concentrated gas-hydrate-bearing reservoir rocks which have the potential to produce gas using current technology. --- Contact Information: Brenda Pierce ( Phone: 703-648-6421 ); Timothy Collett ( Phone: 720-936-2372 ); Clarice Ransom (…

Address

12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
Reston, VA
20192

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 07:00 - 16:00
Sunday 09:00 - 20:00

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when USGS News: Energy posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Nearby government services


Other Government Organizations in Reston

Show All