Blackburn Trail Center

Blackburn Trail Center Owned by PATC. Trailhead parking, blue blaze to AT, potable water, electric outlets on screened-in porch, campsites, hiker cabin inc. woodstove and bunks.
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Campground, hiker hostel, and rental cabin located 1/4 mile off the Appalachian Trail in Round Hill, VA. Owned and operated by the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club. Funded by your donations! Thank you for being a part of Blackburn.

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
08/31/2021

Timeline Photos

The National Hurricane Center has issued a public advisory for Tropical Depression Ida, which is predicted to cause heavy rain along the #AppalachianTrail and surrounding areas. Some portions of the Trail may experience flash flooding and downed trees. #AT hikers are encouraged to monitor weather sites and make adjustments to their plans as needed. For the latest Trail updates, visit https://appalachiantrail.org/trail-updates/

Timeline Photos
08/25/2021

Timeline Photos

Submit your application by August 31, 2021 to be considered for the Next Generation Advisory Council (NextGen)! NextGen encourages young leaders (ages 18-30) to become more involved in the management and stewardship of the #AppalachianTrail. Visit appalachiantrail.org/nextgen2021-22 for more information.

Timeline Photos
08/20/2021

Timeline Photos

The National Hurricane Center has issued a hurricane watch for parts of New England in anticipation of Tropical Storm Henri making landfall on the northeastern U.S. coast on Sunday. This system could cause significant rainfall and strong winds. #AppalachianTrail hikers are encouraged to use extreme caution and make adjustments as more information and updates become available. Be sure to monitor weather sites such as the NOAA National Hurricane Center for updates and alerts: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/. #HikeSafe

Photo by Luis Perrone Fotography

Opportunity for input.
08/18/2021

Opportunity for input.

Shenandoah National Park is seeking feedback* on proposed fee increases to be implemented over the next two years. This proposal does not include an increase in entrance fees and focuses only on specific user fees.

PLEASE NOTE: to have your input considered, you must comment on the website link provided below. We are unable to capture comments from Facebook in the feedback process.

There are three user fees under consideration in the proposal:

1. Increase the campground nightly fee to $30 at all four campgrounds from the current $15/$20 charge. Fees for group campsites, which accommodate up to 25 people at some locations, are also proposed to increase to $75. The increased fees will provide needed revenue to maintain and improve campgrounds.

2. Implement a fee-based online registration system for backcountry permits that allows the Park to track and understand backcountry use in a way that better protects the resource and provides an improved visitor experience. A fee ranging from $20 to $30 is likely to depend on the number of backcountry nights for each permit.

3. Establish a pilot project for Old Rag Mountain visitor access through a new ticketing system online. The new system will require Old Rag users to get daily reservations in advance to help manage visitor use. There will be a minimal procession fee of $1 to $2 during the pilot.

The money collected at entrance stations, campgrounds, and through other user fees supports a great deal of work that would not otherwise be possible. Under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, 80% of all fees are retained and utilized to improve Shenandoah for visitors. Over the past few years, these fee dollars have been used at Shenandoah to make improvements such as:

Rehabilitation and maintenance of campgrounds, Skyline Drive, and park trails are supported by fees. Recreational improvements include: new picnic tables, fire rings, and bear-proof food storage lockers. Rehabilitation projects include: restrooms at Big Meadows Campground and the accessible Limberlost Trail. Maintenance on trails include: 200-220 miles of trails completed. Construction projects include: Old Rag parking lot completed in 2019.

To create a more valuable visitor experience, many services are supported by fees: publishing park brochures and newspapers, visitor center staff, and sanitation staff maintaining restrooms in campgrounds, picnic areas, and visitor centers.

More information about this proposal can be found on our website: https://www.nps.gov/shen/learn/news/shenandoah-national-park-seeks-feedback-on-proposed-user-fees-increase.htm

*In order for your comments to be considered, they must be submitted on PEPC (comments may be made anonymously): https://parkplanning.nps.gov/documentsOpenForReview.cfm?projectID=103975&parkID=274

Timeline Photos
08/17/2021

Timeline Photos

For those on the #AppalachianTrail from Georgia to Virginia, please be aware that heavy wind and rain from Tropical Depression Fred could lead to flash flooding of creeks and river crossings, as well as potential mudslides and downed trees, over the next few days. Monitor weather sites such as the NOAA National Hurricane Center for updates and alerts: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ #HikeSafe

Six Wells on the A.T. Closed
07/29/2021
Six Wells on the A.T. Closed

Six Wells on the A.T. Closed

The National Park Service Appalachian National Scenic Trail Office, in consultation with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and regional Trail Maintaining Clubs, has officially closed six wells along the Appalachian Trail.

Report an Incident
07/19/2021
Report an Incident

Report an Incident

If you see something, say something — reporting dangerous conditions or suspicious behavior will help us keep the A.T. as safe as possible.

Timeline Photos
06/29/2021

Timeline Photos

(7/3/2021) The water system at Washington Monument State Park has been restored.

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TRAIL UPDATE: Washington Monument State Park is currently experiencing water issues and cannot provide water refill for #AppalachianTrail hikers or flushing toilets, per Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Only portable toilets are available.

It is uncertain how long it will take to resolve, but we'll update everyone when there is more info.

Photo by Estelle Maletz

Timeline Photos
06/14/2021

Timeline Photos

There have been multiple reports of graffiti along the #AppalachianTrail, which in some cases might cause long-term (or permanent) impacts to the A.T. experience. Removing graffiti — like the one in this picture — takes time and effort, and is costly for Trail maintainers and volunteers. Help reduce your impact to the #AT by not leaving a mark or tag, and #RecreateResponsibly so that the beauty of the A.T. can be enjoyed by those who will visit after you. #LeaveNoTrace

If you've witnessed any vandalism or illegal activity along the A.T., please call the National Park Service (NPS) tip line (888.653.0009) or report online at https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1563/index.htm #ProtectYourTrail

Timeline Photos
06/02/2021

Timeline Photos

Due to reported aggressive bear activity, the #AppalachianTrail is closed to camping until further notice between Double Springs Shelter (NOBO mile 452) and the Backbone Rock Trail (NOBO mile 465) in northeast Tennessee. Visitors are reminded to never feed/approach bears and bear canisters are the recommended food storage option to help keep humans safe and bears wild.

To learn more about how to minimize your risk of bear encounters, or report a bear encounter on the #AT, visit appalachiantrail.org/bears

PSP searching for missing Appalachian Trail hiker in Central Pa. area
05/30/2021
PSP searching for missing Appalachian Trail hiker in Central Pa. area

PSP searching for missing Appalachian Trail hiker in Central Pa. area

Pennsylvania State Police in Carlisle are searching for a hiker reported missing in the Cumberland/Franklin County area of the Appalachian Trail. 57-year-old John Dunnam was last seen in thearea of Chimney Rocks between the Deer Lick Shelter and the Rocky Mountain Shelter on May 25. Dunnam is descri...

An Update to Our COVID-19 Guidance
05/11/2021
An Update to Our COVID-19 Guidance

An Update to Our COVID-19 Guidance

Following the widespread availability of COVID-19 vaccines and updated CDC guidelines, the ATC has updated its guidance for long-distance hiking on the A.T.

Timeline Photos
04/30/2021

Timeline Photos

UPDATE 5/1/2021: Great news! After a brief closure due to a wildfire, the 7.4-mile section of the #AppalachianTrail near Dragon's Tooth in Virginia has reopened! Many thanks to the hard-working firefighters who worked hard through the night to get the fire contained!

ORIGINAL POST: Due to an active wildfire (the Mason Cove Fire), there is a 7.4-mile closure on the #AppalachianTrail between SR 621/Upper Craig Creek (NOBO mile 689.3) and SR 620/ Miller Cove Road (NOBO mile 696.7), just south of Dragon's Tooth in the Brush Mountain East Wilderness. Please avoid this area for your safety and to allow firefighters to do their work safely and efficiently. We will post more information and updates when available at appalachiantrail.org/updates.

Timeline Photos
04/27/2021

Timeline Photos

Going for a hike on the #AppalachianTrail? While the #AT is a relatively safe place to visit, it doesn't mean that there aren't hazards or dangers that could impact your safety and the safety of others. Here are a few tips to help you #HikeSafe:

• Stay alert: Pay attention to your surroundings and people you may encounter. If you feel uneasy, trust your instincts and get away from the situation.
• Let someone know your plans: Provide details on where you will be and when you plan to return to a family member or friend off Trail.
• Carry a current map/guide and know how to use it: If you require emergency assistance or need to leave the Trail, maps can help tell you where the nearest trailhead, road or town is located.
• Visit our Trail Safety page appalachiantrail.org/safety for more tips!

Have an incident to report? Go to appalachiantrail.org/incidents to learn more about reporting suspicious behavior, vandalism, bear encounters, or resource damage. If you see something, say something.

Photos from Appalachian Trail Conservancy's post
04/12/2021

Photos from Appalachian Trail Conservancy's post

Timeline Photos
04/06/2021

Timeline Photos

Approximately two miles of the #AppalachianTrail in central Virginia along Tar Jacket Ridge between Hog Camp Gap (mile 815.4) and Salt Log Gap (mile 817.6) will be temporarily closed during a prescribed burn conducted by the George Washington National Forest. The burn is expected to take place on Wednesday, April 7 and last for less than a day. There is no alternate route for this section, so #AT hikers should be prepared to wait while the burn is taking place for everyone’s safety.

For more information about this update, visit appalachiantrail.org/trail-updates.

Timeline Photos
03/23/2021

Timeline Photos

The Pennsylvania Game Commission is planning to conduct a few prescribed burns along the #AppalachianTrail this spring.

• State Game Lands 305 - Between now and mid-May 2021, the PA Game Commission plans to conduct a prescribed burn to help regenerate the pitch pine-dry oak forest habitat. This burn will be on lands adjacent to the #AT in the vicinity of Alec Kennedy Shelter (mile 1120.1), Center Point K**b (mile 1121.1), and approximately 3.5-miles south of Boiling Springs, PA (mile 1124.0). The Trail will remain open during the burn.
• State Game Lands 211 - Between now and the end of April 2021, the PA Game Commission plans to conduct a prescribed burn in Lebanon County near Rausch Gap. The A.T. section between the Rausch Creek Bridge (mile 1179.1) and just north of the crest of Second Mountain (mile 1181) may be closed on the day of the burn. Hikers may be asked to use a detour or wait while the burn is taking place for everyone’s safety.

Hikers may experience smoky conditions on the Trail during these prescribed burns. Burn dates vary due to weather conditions, like wind and humidity. To stay up-to-date on the latest Trail alerts and conditions, visit appalachiantrail.org/trail-updates/.

Appalachian Trail Wildflowers
03/20/2021
Appalachian Trail Wildflowers

Appalachian Trail Wildflowers

Spring is here and warmer days are finally upon us, meaning ephemeral spring wildflowers will be sprouting along the A.T.

Timeline Photos
03/19/2021

Timeline Photos

The U.S. Forest Service plans to conduct a prescribed burn along the #AppalachianTrail in Virginia on Saturday, March 20 or Sunday, March 21, 2021, to improve wildlife habitat. The Trail, through the bald on Whitetop mountain, will be temporarily closed in this one-mile section until fire managers deem conditions safe. Signs will be posted at both ends of the Trail in this burn area.

For more information about this update, visit appalachiantrail.org/trail-updates.

Timeline Photos
03/03/2021

Timeline Photos

Join ATC staff for a virtual presentation on hiking the #AppalachianTrail, with a special focus on being an ally to underrepresented groups on March 11, 2021, at 4 pm EST.

“Being an ally is someone who supports a group other than your own in terms of multiple identities like race, age and gender…We’re doing work to understand what partners we haven’t been including in the past, and also creating first time experiences for folks, making sure those experiences are inclusive and safe,” said Julie Judkins, ATC Director of Education and Outreach.

Register here: https://appalachiantrail.org/event/2021-hiker-guidance-how-to-be-an-ally/

Photo by Horizonline Pictures

Appalachian Trail Conservancy
12/17/2020

Appalachian Trail Conservancy

STORM ALERT: Winter Storm Gail will be affecting most of the #AppalachianTrail beginning this morning (December 16) and lasting through the end of the week. Some areas are expected to receive 18 inches of snow or more, strong winds and below-freezing temperatures. Hikers should postpone their trips or, at the very least, use extreme caution and prepare for downed trees, ice and slippery Trail conditions. Current weather conditions can be monitored via the National Weather Service at weather.gov. #HikeSafe

Appalachian Trail Conservancy
09/07/2020

Appalachian Trail Conservancy

Countless hours and thousands of volunteers make the #AppalachianTrail a footpath for feet to walk. This #LaborDay and every day, we thank you for giving your time, resources and energy to the Trail.

Discover ways you can volunteer on the A.T. here: appalachiantrail.org/volunteer or find a Trail Club near you!

Photo by H. Dean Clark

Shifting Perspectives and Realities
07/17/2020
Shifting Perspectives and Realities

Shifting Perspectives and Realities

A commitment to justice, equity, diversity and inclusion is critical for the future protection of the Trail.

07/16/2020

While all buildings at Blackburn remain closed, our campground is open. Good well water is always available from the outside spigot near steps off the driveway. Day and overnight trailhead parking is also available at designated lots. Donation to the Road Fund is always appreciated and box is on tree at the Trailhead Parking Lot. Caretaker Moxey is in residence and can answer your questions. Hike safe, mask up, and remember Leave No Trace. Thanks!

Blackburn Trail Center's cover photo
07/16/2020

Blackburn Trail Center's cover photo

Not Just Another Hiker
06/12/2020
Not Just Another Hiker

Not Just Another Hiker

Shilletha Curtis describes how her experiences outdoors and interactions with A.T. groups online highlight the need for change.

Appalachian Trail Conservancy
06/01/2020

Appalachian Trail Conservancy

Over the past few weeks, we at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) have taken inventory of the social landscape within the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) community and across the United States. We have seen the recent and tragic deaths of black men and women — Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd — generate anger, frustration, resentment, and protest. We have seen, not just in the past few weeks but throughout the history of outdoor recreation, black men and women try to enjoy the outdoors only to have the police called on them while birdwatching (Christian Cooper), to have a gun pulled on them while picnicking (Jessica and Franklin Richardson) or to have been shot while going for a run (Ahmaud Arbery). We know these are only a few stories among many where black men and women have been systematically marginalized and targeted.

We have heard the voices of many — in the cities and beyond — calling for an end to this widespread injustice and racial violence. We have heard the call for a more equitable, inclusive, and peaceful future. Through the anger, sadness, and frustration, we have seen and felt the urgent need for justice, particularly for those who have been pushed to the margins. We, as a Conservancy, join those voices and demand justice but we also recognize the problem exists in our own community.

As we have learned throughout the course of this pandemic, the A.T. is not a separate reality from the rest of the world. The need for justice is just as relevant in the Trail community. The A.T. is not racially or ethnically diverse. It is not accessible to people from low-income communities. It is not always a safe place for women. And, it is not relevant to many people we consider to be part of the next generation. We recognize this must change. We recognize we must orient ourselves and the broader Trail community to justice in its many forms — environmental, social, racial, and economic.

We have taken some steps to address these issues, but a lot of work remains. Justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion must be the cornerstone of everything the ATC does. We will continue to undertake training, we will educate our Trail-wide community, we will diversify representation among our staff, our Board, and our volunteers and visitors. We will continue to reach out to Trailside communities, addressing issues around race, ethnicity, and inclusion — including making the Trail and Trailside communities safe, open, and welcoming spaces for black hikers. We will invest — with time and money — in change.

We feel justice comes in the form of action. We believe action can make meaningful change. We are committing to making the A.T. and the broader Trail community a space that is inclusive, open, and safe for all.

In solidarity and hope,

Sandra Marra
President & CEO
Appalachian Trail Conservancy

Address

34899 Appalachian Trail Rd
Round Hill, VA
20141

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Comments

Hi folks. Great day hike through the area yesterday (Key Gap to you and back out) and found the trail center via jeep afterwards. We had planned to use your location for our next entry and overnight parking for a section hike but definitely have some questions about what you would recommend as we found folks were parked/trapped in by folks parking in middle of the entry road. Was wondering if that is normal and what is recommended by someone who knows the place better than we do. Thanks for any advise you can share.
Is there a place for people to camp in tents?
Can we use the lot for trailhead parking? We are hiking to harpers ferry, staying the night at David Lessors and then coming back for the car the next afternoon.
Hi! Our Troop is planning to hike the AT at the end of June, assuming it is open again, starting at Blackburn. Are showers available and how much do they cost? We might have about 8 Scouts and 2 adults. Thanks.
Hi I have a a group of scouts looking to camp at Blackburn on a Friday night. Hike the Devils Race Course to
Thank you for taking care of this wonderful place and taking care of all the hikers! I made to Harpers Ferry in one piece! You have a clean, friendly place and I told the south bounders about you.
what is the best time of year to hike the area for viewing fall colors?