Miller County Agriculture - University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension

Miller County Agriculture - University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Miller County Agriculture offers research based information on all aspects of agriculture, horticulture, row crops, livestock, plant & tree health, etc.
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Operating as usual

Rice w**d control field day training today in Lonoke.
07/01/2021

Rice w**d control field day training today in Lonoke.

Rice w**d control field day training today in Lonoke.

Did you know that Arkansas is the nation’s top rice exporter, according to a report this week from USDA? Read more: http...
07/01/2021

Did you know that Arkansas is the nation’s top rice exporter, according to a report this week from USDA? Read more: https://bit.ly/3jAqBEq

Did you know that Arkansas is the nation’s top rice exporter, according to a report this week from USDA? Read more: https://bit.ly/3jAqBEq

The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is notifying the public that a new invasive grass species, Cogongrass, has been c...
07/01/2021
Agriculture - Arkansas Department of Agriculture

The Arkansas Department of Agriculture is notifying the public that a new invasive grass species, Cogongrass, has been confirmed in Arkansas for the first time.

For several years botanists and land managers have been on the lookout for Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) in southern Arkansas. This aggressive species, native to Southeast Asia, has spread rapidly across the Deep South over the past few decades. Cogongrass is considered one of the worst invasive species in the world, causing both economic and ecological damages that impact forestry, agriculture, rangeland, and natural ecosystems.

Charles Bryson, retired U.S. Department of Agriculture Botanist, detected a patch of Cogongrass in Helena-West Helena alongside Highway 49. The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, the Arkansas Department of Agriculture’s (Department) Plant Industries Division and Forestry Division, and the Arkansas Department of Transportation were informed of the finding and met onsite on June 16 to spray the invasive plant population with herbicide. Botanists with the Arkansas Department of Transportation conducted surveys along Highway 49 and other roads in the area and detected no additional Cogongrass populations. The agencies are planning to conduct annual surveys along this and other routes coming into southeastern Arkansas from Mississippi. They will also monitor the site and conduct additional herbicide applications as needed over the next few years.

Cogongrass has bright green leaves with serrated margins and a distinctive white vein that is slightly off-center from the middle of the leaf. It has no true, above-ground stem and the leaves emerge directly from stout, creeping rhizomes (underground stems). Cogongrass spreads rapidly from these rhizomes to form distinctive and very dense circular patches which expand in size every year and can displace all other species on the ground. It is also one of the few warm season grasses that bloom immediately after coming out of winter dormancy. A fact sheet with more information and photos is available at http://southernforesthealth.net/plants/cogongrass/cogongrass-biology-and-management-in-the-southeastern-u.s.

Any sightings of Cogongrass in Arkansas should be reported to Paul Shell, the Department’s Plant Inspection and Quarantine Program Manager, at [email protected] or 501-225-1598.

Supporting Arkansas farmers and ranchers while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of Arkansas, the nation, and across the globe

July 4th is the biggest weekend of the year for barbecuing. Have you ever wondered why food off the grill tastes so good...
07/01/2021

July 4th is the biggest weekend of the year for barbecuing. Have you ever wondered why food off the grill tastes so good? Dr. Jeyam Subbiah, head of food science for the University of Arkansas System Extension - UAEX, talks about the chemistry of smoke, flame and food. Read more here: https://bit.ly/2TpSKDo.

July 4th is the biggest weekend of the year for barbecuing. Have you ever wondered why food off the grill tastes so good? Dr. Jeyam Subbiah, head of food science for the University of Arkansas System Extension - UAEX, talks about the chemistry of smoke, flame and food. Read more here: https://bit.ly/2TpSKDo.

07/01/2021

Whether you've been meaning to prune your forsythia or rose bushes, it's a great time of year to do some pruning!

Check out all of our pruning resources, including calendars for pruning your shrubs, deciduous trees, and evergreens:

🌹 Shrub pruning calendar:
https://resources.ext.vt.edu/contentdetail?contentid=3183&

🌳 Deciduous tree pruning calendar: https://resources.ext.vt.edu/contentdetail?contentid=3189

🌲 Evergreen pruning calendar: https://resources.ext.vt.edu/contentdetail?contentid=3190

Image text:
What to prune in July:
Shrubs
Almond, Flowering
Arborvitae
Azalea, deciduous
Azalea, evergreen
Barberry, deciduous
Barberry, evergreen
Beautybush (Kolkwitzia)
Boxwood
Broom (Cytisus)
Cherrylaurel (Prunus)
Daphne, Fragrant or Winter
Deutzia
Eleagnus, Thorny
Euonymus, evergreen
Forsythia
Fothergilla
Hydrangea, spring-
blooming
Indian Hawthorn
(Rhaphiolepis)
Jasmine, Winter
Kerria (Japanese Rose)
Leucothoe
Lilac
Mahonia, Leatherleaf
Mockorange
Mountain Laurel (Kalmia)
Pearlbush
Photinia
Pieris, Japanese Andromeda
Quince, flowering
Rhododendron
Rose
Sweetshrub, Carolina Allspice
Viburnum, deciduous
Weigela
Willow, P***y
Witchhazel
Yew
Deciduous Trees
Beech
Buckeye
Cherry, flowering
Crabapple, ornamental
Dogwood
Fringe Tree
Hawthorn
Horse Chestnut
Magnolia, Tulip Tree
Maple
Peach, flowering
Pear, flowering
Plum, flowering and purple
Redbud
Serviceberry

Evergreen Trees
Arborvitae
Hemlock
Leland Cypress
Magnolia, Southern

Taking fly counts today at the research station for our horn fly demo with Sevier County Agent, Rex Herring. We're using...
06/30/2021

Taking fly counts today at the research station for our horn fly demo with Sevier County Agent, Rex Herring. We're using 5 different fly tags and a control group. It's hard to do fly counts when your partner stays on the phone.😂🤣

06/30/2021

I know of two ag jobs locally. Degrees and/or experience required. PM if interested.

Howard County (Nashville, AR) UofA County Extension Agent for Agriculture position closing July 9th. If interested, appl...
06/28/2021
County Extension Agent - Agriculture

Howard County (Nashville, AR) UofA County Extension Agent for Agriculture position closing July 9th. If interested, apply today.

Current University of Arkansas System employees including student employees and graduate assistants need to log into Workday on My Apps. Simply enter "Find Jobs" in the Workday search bar to view open positions. All Job Postings will close at 12:01 a.m. CT on the specified Closing Date (if designate...

Have you ever went to your garden to find a tomato fruit with a nose or horn, or even a pair of horns? Tomato horns or n...
06/28/2021

Have you ever went to your garden to find a tomato fruit with a nose or horn, or even a pair of horns? Tomato horns or noses occur as a result of an error in cell division. A normal fruit has 4-6 locules when cut in half. When a few cells divide wrong they produce an extra locule. Since there is not enough room inside the fruit for the extra, a horn or nose protrudes from the fruit.

Extended high temperatures (above 90°F during the day and 82-85°F during the night) predisposes the plant toward producing deformed fruit. Some of the older heirloom varieties are more susceptible. This does not affect the taste of the fruit.

Learn more about tomatoes and other plant diseases at the Arkansas Plant Health Clinic at https://www.uaex.edu/yard-garden/plant-health-clinic/default.aspx

Have you ever went to your garden to find a tomato fruit with a nose or horn, or even a pair of horns? Tomato horns or n...
06/28/2021

Have you ever went to your garden to find a tomato fruit with a nose or horn, or even a pair of horns? Tomato horns or noses occur as a result of an error in cell division. A normal fruit has 4-6 locules when cut in half. When a few cells divide wrong they produce an extra locule. Since there is not enough room inside the fruit for the extra, a horn or nose protrudes from the fruit.

Extended high temperatures (above 90°F during the day and 82-85°F during the night) predisposes the plant toward producing deformed fruit. Some of the older heirloom varieties are more susceptible. This does not affect the taste of the fruit.

Learn more about tomatoes and other plant diseases at the Arkansas Plant Health Clinic at https://www.uaex.edu/yard-garden/plant-health-clinic/default.aspx

Checking forages for armyworms and finding Bermuda Stem Maggot. Research has shown up to a 50% yield loss from BSM. Usua...
06/25/2021

Checking forages for armyworms and finding Bermuda Stem Maggot. Research has shown up to a 50% yield loss from BSM. Usually an application of Lambda-Cy 7-10days after a cutting is required.

Also, calibrating a sprayer this afternoon. Notice part of my help sleeping on a trailer. It's hard to find good help these days, especially when it's HOT.

For several years, fly populations on cattle have been significant beginning in late April then increasing to peak popul...
06/25/2021
Conditions are Ideal for Significant Fly Populations on Cattle

For several years, fly populations on cattle have been significant beginning in late April then increasing to peak populations in August or September. This year is slightly different with the cool temperatures from April through May that slowed the fly populations down.

However, with higher humidity and warmer temperatures, these conditions are prime for both horn fly and stable fly populations to explode over the next several weeks.

Read more: https://www.drovers.com/news/beef-production/conditions-are-ideal-significant-fly-populations-cattle

Higher humidity and warmer temperatures are prime conditions for both horn fly and stable fly populations to explode over the next several weeks.

Many wild bee populations are decreasing. But Olivia Kline, an entomology Ph.D. student at the University of Arkansas, i...
06/25/2021

Many wild bee populations are decreasing. But Olivia Kline, an entomology Ph.D. student at the University of Arkansas, is investigating a way Arkansas farmers can give the bees a boost.
Read more: https://bit.ly/AAES-WildBees

Many wild bee populations are decreasing. But Olivia Kline, an entomology Ph.D. student at the University of Arkansas, is investigating a way Arkansas farmers can give the bees a boost.
Read more: https://bit.ly/AAES-WildBees

Do you have Blackberries that look like this? I do!White Drupe or White DrupletWhite druplet is associated with a drop i...
06/25/2021

Do you have Blackberries that look like this? I do!

White Drupe or White Druplet

White druplet is associated with a drop in humidity and an increase in temperature. As this happens there is less moisture in the air to deflect solar radiation from directly contacting the berries. This increased solar radiation is blamed on individual or groups of druplets turning first white and then later brown in color.

This disorder is often a problem early on in the season and may lessen as the season progresses. ‘Apache’ is a variety that is more prone to this disorder.

Orienting the trellis to shade the fruit for most of the day is a method to prevent this disorder on susceptible varieties.

Do you have Blackberries that look like this? I do!

White Drupe or White Druplet

White druplet is associated with a drop in humidity and an increase in temperature. As this happens there is less moisture in the air to deflect solar radiation from directly contacting the berries. This increased solar radiation is blamed on individual or groups of druplets turning first white and then later brown in color.

This disorder is often a problem early on in the season and may lessen as the season progresses. ‘Apache’ is a variety that is more prone to this disorder.

Orienting the trellis to shade the fruit for most of the day is a method to prevent this disorder on susceptible varieties.

Tips for starting a raised garden.
06/24/2021

Tips for starting a raised garden.

🌱 Have you been thinking about creating a raised bed garden, but don't know where to start? Check out this guide to starting a raised bed garden 👉 https://bit.ly/35GrItV

Photos from Gateway Farmers Market's post
06/19/2021

Photos from Gateway Farmers Market's post

Pulling hay samples, forage consultations, and checking on corn today. It's already dry and needing another rain. Nobody...
06/19/2021

Pulling hay samples, forage consultations, and checking on corn today. It's already dry and needing another rain. Nobody cuss me for saying that.

#extensionisthereforyou #millercounty #allaboutagriculture #whatcanwedoforyou #strongertogether #weworkforyou

PSA: Forage producers be on the lookout for fall armyworms.If found in Forages, the economic threshold is 3+ per sq ft o...
06/18/2021

PSA: Forage producers be on the lookout for fall armyworms.

If found in Forages, the economic threshold is 3+ per sq ft over an average of 10 different counts across the field. If so, our current forage recommendation is generic Lambda-Cy 3.8oz + generic dimilin (IGR) 2oz and this will get you approximately 2-3 weeks.

Feel free to reach out to me with questions.

Jennifer Caraway
Miller County Extension Agent

#millercounty #allaboutagriculture #whatcanwedoforyou #strongertogether #weworkforyou

PSA: Forage producers be on the lookout for fall armyworms.

If found in Forages, the economic threshold is 3+ per sq ft over an average of 10 different counts across the field. If so, our current forage recommendation is generic Lambda-Cy 3.8oz + generic dimilin (IGR) 2oz and this will get you approximately 2-3 weeks.

Feel free to reach out to me with questions.

Jennifer Caraway
Miller County Extension Agent

#millercounty #allaboutagriculture #whatcanwedoforyou #strongertogether #weworkforyou

Internal parasites cause a variety of clinical signs, including weight loss, diarrhea and death. Other, less obvious par...
06/18/2021
Biggs: Internal Parasite Control

Internal parasites cause a variety of clinical signs, including weight loss, diarrhea and death. Other, less obvious parasitic signs, (often referred to as subclinical signs), significantly impact cattle producers.

https://www.drovers.com/news/beef-production/biggs-internal-parasite-control

Internal parasites cause a variety of clinical signs, including weight loss, diarrhea and death. Other, less obvious parasitic signs, (often referred to as subclinical signs), significantly impact producers.

Having problems with your tomato plants? Here is some great information for treating tomato diseases from the Arkansas H...
06/15/2021

Having problems with your tomato plants? Here is some great information for treating tomato diseases from the Arkansas Health Clinic:
https://www.uaex.edu/yard-garden/plant-health-clinic/docs/2021-Plant-Health-Clinic-Newsletters/Plant%20Health%20Clinic%20Newsletter-Issue%20%2016.pdf

Free one-hour, interactive Soybean Agricultural Sustainability Virtual Field Trip!Tuesday, June 22, 2021 at 10 a.m. CSTR...
06/15/2021

Free one-hour, interactive
Soybean Agricultural Sustainability
Virtual Field Trip!

Tuesday, June 22, 2021
at 10 a.m. CST

Register Here: https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/special-programs/Education_in_Agriculture/virtual-field-trips.aspx

Zoom instructions will be emailed to registered participants.

During this virtual field trip, we will give an overview of the sustainability practices used by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Soybean program. Arkansas’ soybean production history, farm sustainability efforts, and future will be discussed. Sustainability standards and goals for soybean producers will be shared by industry leaders representing the U.S. Soybean Export Council, the Arkansas Soybean Association, and we will hear from a local soybean producer.

For information about the
Soil and Water Conservation Virtual Field Trip (VFT) Series:

https://bit.ly/NRCS-AR-Soil-and-Water-VFT-Webpage

Free one-hour, interactive
Soybean Agricultural Sustainability
Virtual Field Trip!

Tuesday, June 22, 2021
at 10 a.m. CST

Register Here: https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/special-programs/Education_in_Agriculture/virtual-field-trips.aspx

Zoom instructions will be emailed to registered participants.

During this virtual field trip, we will give an overview of the sustainability practices used by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Soybean program. Arkansas’ soybean production history, farm sustainability efforts, and future will be discussed. Sustainability standards and goals for soybean producers will be shared by industry leaders representing the U.S. Soybean Export Council, the Arkansas Soybean Association, and we will hear from a local soybean producer.

For information about the
Soil and Water Conservation Virtual Field Trip (VFT) Series:

https://bit.ly/NRCS-AR-Soil-and-Water-VFT-Webpage

On a hot summer day, we often dress in light clothing, drink more water than normal, and seek shade to minimize the impa...
06/15/2021
How to manage heat stress in cattle this summer | AGDAILY

On a hot summer day, we often dress in light clothing, drink more water than normal, and seek shade to minimize the impacts on the body from heat and humidity.

Kansas State University Beef Cattle Institute experts said cattle need many of those same strategies for maximum performance over the summer.
https://www.agdaily.com/livestock/manage-heat-stress-cattle-summer/

Kansas State University Beef Cattle Institute experts said cattle need plenty of water and shade are two keys to success in keeping cattle comfortable.

Address

1007 Jefferson Avenue
Texarkana, AR
71854

General information

We are part of the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service's statewide network and the University of Arkansas System's Division of Agriculture. Our mission is to provide research-based information through non-formal education to help all Arkansans improve their economic well-being and the quality of lives. Whether it is agriculture, 4-H, health and living, or community development, the Miller County Extension Office is at your service.

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

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Comments

What causes this on my peach tree? My peaches was like this last year. Found only 2 peaches so far this year with this stuff. Plz help!
How do I get rid of sticker w**ds?
In North Carolina, we have these same little critters...just thought I'd pass this information along
Could you repost the info on spurw**d again please! Thanks
What is this and how do I get rid of it??
Can't find articles on stump removal. Help
Can anyone tell me why my cucumbers are turning out like this?