UAEX - Miller County Agriculture

UAEX - Miller County Agriculture Miller County Agriculture offers research based information on all aspects of agriculture, horticulture, row crops, livestock, plant & tree health, etc.
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Are you having this issue with your tomato plants?
05/19/2020

Are you having this issue with your tomato plants?

05/19/2020
Lick Creek Meats

A great discussion with Jennifer Sansom, Little River County UAEX Agriculture & Natural Resources on 107.1 FM with Dawn Parker on the beef industry, cattle vs beef shortages, labor force issues, and more.

If you missed us on 107.1 FM this morning, listen now!

It’s farmers’ market season in Arkansas, although this year’s markets are anything but business as usual. Amid the COVID...
05/18/2020

It’s farmers’ market season in Arkansas, although this year’s markets are anything but business as usual. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, market managers and vendors have had to rethink their operations to stay in business and consider whether they should open at all this season. Read more - https://bit.ly/2z9EggD.

Leucostoma Canker is a serious disease of peach, nectarines, and sweet cherries. Symptoms on small twigs begin as sunken...
05/18/2020

Leucostoma Canker is a serious disease of peach, nectarines, and sweet cherries. Symptoms on small twigs begin as sunken, discolored spots, usually around leaf scars or winter killed buds. The lesions often have alternating zone lines. With age the lesions darken and begin to exude amber gum. Cankers on main branches and crotches are typically elliptical with large amounts of oozing gum. Cracks open in the infected bark showing blackened tissue beneath the bark. During the growing season the lesion may develop a callus around it as the tree tries to wall off the infection. However the fungus invades the tissue again when the tree is dormant and cannot actively resist infection.

Management of Leucostoma is based on cultural practices to prevent canker formation. Good site selection is critical. Deep, well-drained soil and good air circulation help limit disease. Training of young trees during the first season to prevent narrow crotch angles helps prevent predisposing conditions for the disease. Good borer control is very important as the insects allow entry points for the fungus. Cankers on large limbs and trunks should be removed in midsummer and burned. All diseased bark surrounding the canker and 3-5cm of healthy tissue around the canker should be removed. Tools must be dipped in alcohol or a 10% bleach solution between cuts. Removing cankers should only be attempted when dry weather is expected for 3 days in a row.

Another serious and pervasive fungal disease of stone fruits is Brown Rot. Flowers turn brown and become a gummy mass. The infection travels down and can girdle the twig. Lens-shaped lesions can form on branches and the trunk. The infected tissue becomes covered with grayish-tan spore mass that provides secondary inoculum for additional infections. Brown rot appears on ripening to mature fruit as a rapidly growing, firm brown decay.

The fruit becomes covered with the grayish-tan spore masses and eventually mummifies on the tree. Immature fruit that is infected remain on the tree and mummify also. Since Monilinia overwinters on mummified fruit, twigs, and cankers, sanitation is very important in the home orchard. However tedious a procedure, it is helpful to clean up as much infected tissue as possible. Homeowners may use Ortho Home Orchard Spray, or Bonide Fruit Tree Spray, or Hi-Yield Captan 50WP, or Bonide Captan 50WP, or Spectracide Immunox, or Bonide Fung-onil Multipurpose Fungicide Concentrate. Commercial growers may use Abound, or Quadris Top, or Topguard, or Pristine, or Captan, or Indar, or Eagle, or Fontelis, or Propimax, or Tilt, or Scala, or Gem, or Fontelis, Adament, or Ziram Granuflo. Timing of the first sprays is of the utmost importance. Begin at pink bud in the spring and follow label for repeat sprays.

Read more about these and other plant diseases by visiting: https://www.uaex.edu/yard-garden/plant-health-clinic/default.aspx

While spiny witch-hazel gall aphids can be quite alarming to homeowners, they do no serious harm to healthy birch trees....
05/18/2020

While spiny witch-hazel gall aphids can be quite alarming to homeowners, they do no serious harm to healthy birch trees.

The first symptoms are birch leaves with distorted corrugations or bumpy ridges. Infested leaves turn brown and fall from the tree. Control is not usually warranted because healthy trees produce a new crop of leaves to replace those destroyed by the aphids. The life cycle of this interesting aphid takes two full years to complete. Eggs are laid on witch-hazel in June and July. The eggs hatch in the spring and the nymphs feed on the flower buds. The feeding activity causes a spiny gall to form on the affected witch-hazel. Winged aphids develop inside the spiny galls, then leave and fly to birch. This generation gives birth to a scale-like generation, which hibernates on birch until the following spring. At bud break the scale-like aphids feed on the new leaves, causing them to form corrugated galls. When the aphids mature into winged adults, they migrate back to witch-hazel. For more information on this and other plant health issues, visit the Plant Health Clinic at https://www.uaex.edu/yard-garden/plant-health-clinic/default.aspx

Photos: Birch Spiny Witch-hazel Gall Aphids- Hamamelistes spinosus

Have you seen these on the leaves of your roses or other plants? They are called sawflies, a non-stinging member of the ...
05/18/2020

Have you seen these on the leaves of your roses or other plants? They are called sawflies, a non-stinging member of the wasp family. Read more on control below.

Rose

Sawflies are non-stinging members of the wasp family. Their larvae feed on the leaves of roses and other plants. Three species in particular feed on rose leaves, the Roseslug, Endelomyia aethiops, the Bristly roseslug, Cladius difformis, and the Curled roseslug, Allantus cinctus. Depending on species they grow to ½ inch to ¾ inches in length. They feed mostly at night, on the surfaces of leaf tissue between the veins, leaving an area of translucent tissue that turns brown when exposed to the air. Extensive damage can occur as large areas are skeletonized. The adult sawflies emerge early in the spring and lay eggs on the underside of the leaves. Larvae hatch, feed on the leaves for approximately a month, and then drop into the soil to pupate. Depending on species, there is one to six generations per year. Roseslugs may be handpicked and destroyed. In severe cases, Insecticidal soap, horticultural oil, and products containing acephate, bifenthrin, carbaryl, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate, lambda cyhalothrin, permethrin or spinosad are effective. Soil drenches or granular applications of dinotefuran or imidacloprid can also be used to control sawflies.

🐝🎬❗️ LIVE FROM THE HIVE ❗️🎬🐝Join Extension apiculturist, Jon Zawislak, for a Facebook Live broadcast Wednesday, May 20th...
05/15/2020

🐝🎬❗️ LIVE FROM THE HIVE ❗️🎬🐝

Join Extension apiculturist, Jon Zawislak, for a Facebook Live broadcast Wednesday, May 20th at noon, straight from his personal bee yard and learn beekeeping basics.

🐝🎬❗️ LIVE FROM THE HIVE ❗️🎬🐝

Join Extension apiculturist, Jon Zawislak, for a Facebook Live broadcast on our UAEX page Wednesday, May 20th at noon. We will be broadcasting from his personal bee yard to learn some beekeeping basics! Got questions for a beekeeping pro? Here's your chance to ask! Comment on this post and Jon will answer your questions LIVE.
* In the event of unfavorable weather, the live will be rescheduled.

Giant Asian Murder Hornets have been in the news causing some concern. What we're likely seeing now is the large queens ...
05/15/2020

Giant Asian Murder Hornets have been in the news causing some concern. What we're likely seeing now is the large queens of the European hornet - Peace-Lovin' EuroHornets, since they aren't typically aggressive and have been in Arkansas for years. They can be distinguished from their Far East cousins by the teardrop black marks on the black stripes.

Alright people. I know that it’s in the news, and folks get concerned by a critter named a “Murder Hornet”. What we’re seeing now are likely the large queens of the European hornet. Let’s just call them Peace-Lovin’ EuroHornets, seeing as how they typically aren’t aggressive. They’ve been in AR for years. The teardrop black marks on the black stripes of the Peace-Lovin’ EuroHornets make them distinguishable from their Far East cousin.

I know that COVID-19 is on everyone's mind, but other nasty zoonotic viruses are still alive and well in Arkansas!  Dr. ...
05/15/2020

I know that COVID-19 is on everyone's mind, but other nasty zoonotic viruses are still alive and well in Arkansas! Dr. Ward received a report that a kitten tested positive for rabies in Conway County. To make matters worse, the kitten had bitten a young girl in the family who now has to undergo post-exposure prophylaxis.

I have seen several Facebook posts about people finding abandoned kittens in the past few weeks. This recent case shows us that even kittens can fall victim to this virus, and as you know, kittens have teeth! The current state rabies case map and our rabies fact sheet are attached. If you receive any inquiries about abandoned animals or know someone who is caring for stray animals, please let them be aware. Learn more about rabies here in our fact sheet-https://bit.ly/2WAOlfA

#COVID19 and other illness-causing bugs. She's an associate professor of food safety and microbiology for the Arkansas A...
05/14/2020

#COVID19 and other illness-causing bugs. She's an associate professor of food safety and microbiology for the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, the research arm of the Division of Agriculture. She has some tips to help keep your food, your mobile device and yourself, safe. Visit https://bit.ly/DrKristen-COVID to learn more. #StillOntheJob

Kristen Gibson de la División de Agricultura sabe un poco sobre COVID-19 y otros gérmenes que causan enfermedades. Es profesora asociada de seguridad alimentaria y microbiología para la Estación Experimental Agrícola de Arkansas, el brazo de investigación de la División de Agricultura. Ella tiene algunos consejos para ayudarlo a mantener su comida, su dispositivo móvil y usted mismo, a salvo. Visite https://bit.ly/DrKristen-COVIDpara obtener más información.#StillOntheJob

A one-hour live stream event brought to you in partnership with the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and Arkansas Farm...
05/13/2020

A one-hour live stream event brought to you in partnership with the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and Arkansas Farm to School!

Time: Thursday, May 14th at 1:30 p.m. CST

Topic: Rainbow Gardening! A colorful guide to growing fruits, veggies, and herbs at Heifer Ranch.

Join a live virtual field trip where we will tour the certified organic production gardens at Heifer Ranch and learn more about gardening best practices. Attendees will be able to ask questions and interact throughout the LIVE event. In case of rain, the virtual event will be hosted on May 18th, 2020 at 1:30 PM CST.

We will:
• Examine human health benefits of different plants
• Find examples of different colored fruits, vegetables, and herbs
• Talk about optimal growing environments
• Answer your questions on how to grow better
And MORE!

Click the link below to register for this event.
Register here: https://bit.ly/2SYSlEi

Join us for a bi-weekly open space discussion with the local foods community. We invite farms, food stands, farmers mark...
05/12/2020

Join us for a bi-weekly open space discussion with the local foods community. We invite farms, food stands, farmers markets, CSA's, small grocers, cottage food businesses, farm-to-school programs, restaurants, pop-up food shops, and other food businesses to attend. Registration is free!
Register here: https://bit.ly/2YWwWja

Dr. Ron Rainey, Extension Economist & Center Director, will share results from a survey conducted by Extension and the Arkansas Farmers Market Association on how farmers markets and their managers are responding to COVID-19.

Teresa Maurer, Fayetteville Farmers Market Co-manager and Vendor Coordinator, will share her experiences managing the market during the COVID-19 pandemic, including success, challenges and how they have adapted to social distancing requirements. A Q&A discussion will follow.

A one-hour live stream event brought to you in partnership with the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and Arkansas Farm...
05/12/2020

A one-hour live stream event brought to you in partnership with the Arkansas Department of Agriculture and Arkansas Farm to School!

Time: Thursday, May 14th at 1:30 p.m. CST

Topic: Rainbow Gardening! A colorful guide to growing fruits, veggies, and herbs at Heifer Ranch.

Join a live virtual field trip where we will tour the certified organic production gardens at Heifer Ranch and learn more about gardening best practices. Attendees will be able to ask questions and interact throughout the LIVE event. In case of rain, the virtual event will be hosted on May 18th, 2020 at 1:30 PM CST.

We will:
• Examine human health benefits of different plants
• Find examples of different colored fruits, vegetables, and herbs
• Talk about optimal growing environments
• Answer your questions on how to grow better
And MORE!

Click the link below to register for this event.
Register here: https://bit.ly/2SYSlEi

Research has shown that replacing some crude protein in feed with amino acid supplements can reduce the carbon footprint...
05/12/2020

Research has shown that replacing some crude protein in feed with amino acid supplements can reduce the carbon footprint of swine production while maintaining animal health and performance. Read more: https://bit.ly/AAES-SwineFeed

Join Faulkner County Master Gardeners for a FREE Learning to Grow presentation on Zoom by lifestyle blogger, Amber Card....
05/12/2020

Join Faulkner County Master Gardeners for a FREE Learning to Grow presentation on Zoom by lifestyle blogger, Amber Card.
May 19, 2020
6 p.m.

Register in advance for this meeting at the link below:

https://bit.ly/fromgardentotable

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Planting a garden is a delight, but using it to feed and entertain others is priceless. The experience of planting could and should enhance fond memories and connections to our fellow humans.

Garden treats are fun to plant, tend, and watch grow, but do you add the extra spice to your meals? Let’s take that extra sprinkle and watch other’s enjoy the fruits of our labor in the events we create. The real entertaining doesn’t have to have fancy dishes and set up. A fragrant, indulgent glass of thyme lemonade with a lovely vegetable tray is the perfect thing to spike lively conversations.

As the sun sets and the world begins to slow, let’s conclude the story with memories of a day well spent. Turn on your twinkle lights, pour you happiest of beverages and watch the night garden come alive.

For more information contact Krista Quinn at [email protected]

Research shows that trees provide a multitude of benefits to communities. Krista Quinn, County Extension Agent in Faulkn...
05/12/2020

Research shows that trees provide a multitude of benefits to communities. Krista Quinn, County Extension Agent in Faulkner County, will discuss some of the ways that trees help communities and introduce some methods that communities can use to manage their community trees.

Greene County Brown Bag Lunch via Zoom
May 12, 2020
12 to 1 p.m.

Grab your lunch, sit down with your computer or phone, and join the Greene County Master Gardeners for a FREE Brown Bag Lunch Lecture.

Register in advance for this meeting at the link below:
https://bit.ly/GreeneHealthyTrees
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

For more information contact Krista Quinn at [email protected]

Join White County's Brown Bag Lecture Series on Zoom. May 13th is Fungi with a Fun Guy with Dr. Vic Ford. It's open to t...
05/11/2020

Join White County's Brown Bag Lecture Series on Zoom. May 13th is Fungi with a Fun Guy with Dr. Vic Ford. It's open to the public.

Join Dr. Vic Ford, Extension's Associate Director for Ag & Natural Resources, for 'Fungi with a Fun Guy,' on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 from 12:05-12:50 p.m. as part of the Brown Bag Lecture Series via Zoom hosted by Sherri Sanders UAEX White County Agent.

From the presenter: "Ever thought about what is going on under your feet? Ever see funny things in your garden that you really didn’t know what it was? What about that abundance of mushrooms that pop up in your yard? There is a whole world that most people never see or understand. Let’s take a closer look and see what we can find." - Dr. Vic Ford

➡️Register now: https://uaex.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIrdO-ppjgrHdN7KZaPo4Eih4CqfD6CfwqA

Farmers, the burden of the #COVID19 pandemic on your livelihoods may have you seeking financial assistance. Our COVID-19...
05/11/2020

Farmers, the burden of the #COVID19 pandemic on your livelihoods may have you seeking financial assistance. Our COVID-19 website has information on deferred payments, paycheck protection, and CARES Act benefits to better assist you with location appropriate help for your needs. We are #StillOnTheJob helping Arkansas farmers weather this storm! Visit https://bit.ly/UAEX-Aid-for-Farms for additional information.

Working with Hank Chaney today scouting a rice field. Producer has had a hard time getting the rice in due to rain. Prod...
05/11/2020

Working with Hank Chaney today scouting a rice field. Producer has had a hard time getting the rice in due to rain. Producer is going to plant about half before the rain hits then try to fly the rest on.

Lunas are one of our most beautiful moths.Host plants for the young include sweetgum, hickory, walnut, sumac, and persim...
05/07/2020

Lunas are one of our most beautiful moths.Host plants for the young include sweetgum, hickory, walnut, sumac, and persimmon. In the north, there is one generation per year, where in the south 2-3 generations per year.

I was walking my miles before work last week and came across a pair of Luna moths mating on a privet. Lunas are one of our most beautiful moths. They are lime green bordered with purple with eyespots on both pairs of wings and have graceful, long tails. They average 2.95-4.1 inches. The adults have no mouthparts and do not feed. The males can fly long distances in response to a females pheromones. Mating typically occurs after midnight. The female lays 200-400 eggs, either singly or in small groups. It takes about a week for them to hatch. The caterpillars are green and go through five instars. Host plants for the young include sweetgum, hickory, walnut, sumac, and persimmon. In the north, there is one generation per year, where in the south 2-3 generations per year.

Address

400 Laurel St, Ste 215
Texarkana, AR
71854

General information

We are part of the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service's statewide network and the University of Arkansas System's Division of Agriculture. Our mission is to provide research-based information through non-formal education to help all Arkansans improve their economic well-being and the quality of lives. Whether it is agriculture, 4-H, health and living, or community development, the Miller County Extension Office is at your service.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(870) 779-3609

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Comments

How do I get rid of sticker weeds?
In North Carolina, we have these same little critters...just thought I'd pass this information along
Could you repost the info on spurweed again please! Thanks
What is this and how do I get rid of it??
Can't find articles on stump removal. Help
Can anyone tell me why my cucumbers are turning out like this?