UAEX - Miller County Agriculture

UAEX - Miller County Agriculture Miller County Agriculture offers research based information on all aspects of agriculture, horticulture, row crops, livestock, plant & tree health, etc.
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The Agricultural Abandoned Pesticide Program collected 694,387 pounds of unwanted pesticides in ten counties during 2020...
12/22/2020

The Agricultural Abandoned Pesticide Program collected 694,387 pounds of unwanted pesticides in ten counties during 2020 collection events. Since 2005, the Agricultural Abandoned Pesticide Program has overseen the collection of 5,125,965 pounds of unwanted pesticides in counties across Arkansas.

Participation in collection events is free and anonymous to farmers and other non-industrial landowners. The program is funded through pesticide registration fees. Pesticide collection events have taken place in every county in the state.

Commonly collected items include old or outdated pesticides and registered pesticides that are unusable, and pesticides that have been exposed to the elements or have been held over from previous growing seasons.

The Agricultural Abandoned Pesticide Program is conducted in cooperation with University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX), Arkansas Farm Bureau Federation, and the Arkansas Department of Energy and Environment. Representatives from these agencies make up the Abandoned Pesticide Advisory Board. This board selects county sites for collection events. Priority watersheds are a large consideration for the Advisory Board in choosing counties/regions for site collection.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series continues via Zoom in the new year!  Join us to learn about the joys of gardening and horti...
12/22/2020

The Brown Bag Lecture Series continues via Zoom in the new year! Join us to learn about the joys of gardening and horticulture from the comfort of your own home or office!
You are invited to a Zoom meeting.

When: Jan 6, 2021 12:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://bit.ly/2LFkKyEzBrownBagSherrieSmith

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

The results of the 2020 elections have led to changes that could be historically significant for U.S. agriculture. To gi...
12/21/2020

The results of the 2020 elections have led to changes that could be historically significant for U.S. agriculture. To give some clarity on what these changes could mean, The National Agricultural Law Center is hosting a free webinar analyzing agricultural law and policy in light of the 2020 election results. Read more - https://bit.ly/3p5qIY6.

UAEX - Miller County Agriculture's cover photo
12/17/2020

UAEX - Miller County Agriculture's cover photo

A great reminder from my colleague and friend, Rex Herring about spurweed. 2020 has been a year for the books. Let me of...
12/17/2020

A great reminder from my colleague and friend, Rex Herring about spurweed.

2020 has been a year for the books. Let me offer a couple suggestions to make 2021 a bit better. We are still in 2020 and it offers a great opportunity to control spurweed or commonly known as yard stickers. Let the temperature get to at least 55 degrees in the daytime and apply a mixture of Atrazine and 2,4-D at this time of the year and you will be the hero this spring. Also all of those pasture weeds that make them look lovely in March are out there actively strutting their stuff right now but we don't seem to notice them right now because they are small at this time of the year. This is good time to get those under control also. There are several good applications for them but I have two that I like to recommend. Weedmaster herbicide works great in the cooler weather. Another mix that will do a good job is a mixture of 2,4-D and metsulfron. If you have questions please give me or your local county extension agent a shout and we would love to help you out.

Have you brought some live poinsettias home recently? Here are some tips on caring for them so you can help this year's ...
12/15/2020

Have you brought some live poinsettias home recently? Here are some tips on caring for them so you can help this year's plant bloom again in 2021!

If you've taken home some live poinsettias recently, we have a few tips on how to care for them. ✔️ And for the brave souls willing to go through the process, we have instructions on how to help this year’s plant bloom again in 2021!
🔆 They require bright light and should be kept away from drafts.
🌡️ Keep them between 65 and 70 degrees
💧 Keep plants well-watered but do not over-water.
If you want to try to get your poinsettia to re-bloom next year follow these steps:👇
1. After the bracts fade or fall, set the plants where they will receive indirect light and temperatures around 55-60 degrees
2. Water sparingly during this time, just enough to keep the stems from shriveling.
3. Cut the plants back to within about 5" from the ground and re-pot in fresh soil.
4. As soon as new growth begins, place in a well-lighted window.
5. After the danger of frost, place the pot out of doors in a partially shaded spot.
6. Pinch the new growth back to get a plant with several stems. Do not pinch after September 1.
7. About Labor Day, or as soon as the nights are cool, bring the plant indoors 🏠 .
8. Continue to grow them in a sunny room with a night temperature of about 65 degrees Fahrenheit.
🏵️ Poinsettias bloom only during SHORT DAYS.
9. To initiate blooms, exclude artificial light, either by covering with a light-proof box each evening or placing it in an unlighted room or closet for a minimum of 12 hours of darkness.
10. 🌞 Plants require full light in the daytime, so be sure to return them to a sunny window.
11. Start the short-day treatment in about mid-September to have blooms between December 1 and Christmas.

Grass tetany usually occurs when cattle or sheep are eating lush, spring grass or annual cereal forages such as rye, whe...
12/12/2020
Winter tetany a possible problem in beef cattle

Grass tetany usually occurs when cattle or sheep are eating lush, spring grass or annual cereal forages such as rye, wheat or triticale. However, it also can occur when cattle are being fed harvested forages.

It is a metabolic disorder of cattle related to a deficiency of magnesium. Magnesium is critical to the nervous system and muscle function.

Low levels of magnesium can result in cattle that exhibit hyperexcitability, reduced feed intake and muscle twitching, especially around the face and ears. Cattle also may appear uncoordinated and walk with a stiff gait.

Read more here - https://bit.ly/3oK1HkQ

The disorder can occur when cattle are being fed harvested forages.

Don't miss this holiday lecture with the legendary horticulture expert, Janet Carson.
12/11/2020

Don't miss this holiday lecture with the legendary horticulture expert, Janet Carson.

Don't miss this free holiday lecture with the legendary horticulture expert, Janet Carson. She will discuss how to keep your holiday plants looking gorgeous and what winter gardening chores you need to be doing.

When: Dec. 14th, 12-12:50 PM

Where: Via Zoom

Register here - https://uaex.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIudeCgqTIsEtL-y1jMG0sOAqokriAphBii

This year has come with unimaginable hardships. From the scares of COVID-19 to many businesses closing to people losing ...
12/11/2020
How to plan for an uncertain 2021

This year has come with unimaginable hardships. From the scares of COVID-19 to many businesses closing to people losing their jobs, to depression and abuse ... and the list continues.

Ranchers are resilient, tough and disciplined and are known to plan ahead. However, how do you prepare your business to anticipate what 2021 will bring.

Mike Kappel, founder and CEO of Patriot Software, LLC, wrote an article - "Planning for 2021-A Lesson From 2020" that you might find applicable. Read it here - https://bit.ly/3gLgYPO

As the end of 2020 draws near, here are four action items to consider for your business before 2021 arrives.

While winter temperatures may make things uncomfortable for the humans involved, livestock experts with University of Ar...
12/10/2020

While winter temperatures may make things uncomfortable for the humans involved, livestock experts with University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) say that as long as they’re well-fed and dry, cattle, horses and other livestock should be just fine. Read the story here - https://bit.ly/2K85IR2.

Overgrazed pastures are a common sight in the fall. Dirk Philipp, associate professor of animal science for the Universi...
12/08/2020

Overgrazed pastures are a common sight in the fall.

Dirk Philipp, associate professor of animal science for the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX), said, “There’s usually a host of non-desirable species such as broomsedge, foxtail and even pigweed showing up in overgrazed pastures.”

But the aesthetic effects of overgrazing are secondary to the actual ecological impacts that may be taking place, Philipp said.

Read more - https://bit.ly/2VQIaCO.

At Home with UAEX
12/08/2020

At Home with UAEX

Do you love the idea of freshly baked sugar cookies with family around the table decorating them? Maybe you want to deliver them as gifts for others. If so, Baking Perfect Christmas Cookies Every Time, found here – https://bit.ly/37Cl4p4 - can help you make the best buttery sugar cookies, and help eliminate some of your cookies’ baking errors. Melt In Your Mouth Sugar Cookies is my favorite sugar cookie, one I have made all my adult life. It’s the almond extract that makes them so good. Give them a try and let us know what you think. You can find help at any of our county extension offices https://www.uaex.edu/counties/. Just ask for the Family & Consumer Sciences agent. We love to help!

In the Garden with Holiday Plants and Winter Chores Zoom Training with Janet Carson, Retired University of Arkansas Divi...
12/05/2020

In the Garden with Holiday Plants and Winter Chores Zoom Training with Janet Carson, Retired University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Horticulture Specialist.

December 14th from 12:00-12:50 PM

Click link below to register.

Brown Bag Lecture Series via Zoom
Holiday Plants and Winter Chores with Janet Carson

Hosted by White County
December 14, 2020
12:00 - 12:50 p.m.

Join us for a special holiday treat! Janet Carson will be the guest speaker for our upcoming Brown Bag Lecture series. If you can’t view it live, register anyway and the link to the recording will be sent to you.

When: Dec 14, 2020 12:00 PM Central Time (US and Canada)
Register in advance for this meeting:
https://bit.ly/Brown-Bag-Holiday-Plants-Janet-Carson

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Hay Management Tips• Protect hay when feeding by using rings to reduce waste. Unrolling hay increases hay waste unless i...
12/04/2020

Hay Management Tips

• Protect hay when feeding by using rings to reduce waste. Unrolling hay increases hay waste unless it is done on a controlled basis.

• Consider using a temporary electric wire fence wire. This reduces waste from trampling and increases utilization of the hay.

• Unroll the bale, then string up an electrified polywire down the length of the line of hay.

• Place the wire about 30 inches high over the hay.

• Cattle will line up as if eating at a feed bunk.

Here are some tips for pasture management from University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Animal ...
12/03/2020

Here are some tips for pasture management from University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Animal Science Department - https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/animals-forages
Pasture Management

• Soil fertility management
• Fall and winter is a good time to correct imbalances in pH
• Soil fertility and pH should be monitored regularly
• pH in pasture soil drops relatively fast because of leaching of calcium carbonates and lack of soil mixing like in a cropping system with frequent tillage
• Correcting pH will take several months so it is wise to check lime requirements before next year's growing season
• Collect at least 15 subsamples per pasture using a zig-zag course
• Mix the subsamples then submit one composite sample per pasture to the county extension office
• Use appropriate crop code
• Read Fact Sheet 2121.

Weed control
• Winter annual weeds such as buttercup, thistle, and henbit are germinating now.
• Start spraying pastures where there were problems in the past.
• Late fall and winter spraying is very effective.
• For identification and control recommendations, refer to MP 522.

Grazing management

• Stockpiled bermudagrass
• Graze out by January 1
• Use grazing methods that avoid trampling of forage and ensure high forage utilization, such as strip grazing
• Strip grazing improves forage utilization and may double the number of grazing days compared to continuous grazing.
• Stockpiled fescue
• Begin grazing
• Use grazing methods that avoid trampling of forage and ensure high forage utilization, such as strip grazing.
• Fact Sheet 3133.

Winter annual small grains/ryegrass:

• Begin grazing once canopy reaches height of 8 inches.
• Use grazing methods that avoid trampling and ensure high forage utilization, such as rotational grazing or limit-grazing.
• Under limit-grazing, cows are routinely pastured on dormant pasture or fed hay in a dry-lot, but are allowed to eat their fill from a limited-access winter annual pasture several times per week.
• Research has demonstrated, limit-grazing of beef cows and calves on a mixture of wheat/rye/ryegrass (planted at 0.2 acre of per head) for two days per week produced the same cow, calf, and rebreeding performance as cows fed unlimited hay plus a supplement.
• Limit-grazed cows also consumed 30 percent less hay during the winter feeding period.
• Fact Sheet 3064 .

Brassica (turnips, turnip hybrid, rape):

• Use grazing methods that avoid trampling of forage and ensure high forage utilization, such as rotational grazing or limit-grazing.
• Graze out by January 1.

Here are some tips for fall calving herds from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Ani...
12/02/2020

Here are some tips for fall calving herds from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Animal Science Department - https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/animals-forages

• Turn bulls in with cow herd. Watch bulls' behavior carefully. Be sure they are seeking cows in estrus and are able to mount and breed cows.

• Breeding fall calving heifers should be about over by the end of December. It is important for heifers to breed early in their first breeding season and it's a good idea to breed heifers 30 days before the mature cow herd. Heifers should have had three chances to breed by the end of December.

• Monitor body condition especially if December is cold and wet. Winter weather can bring an increase in TDN and dry matter intake. Additional hay and supplement may be necessary to maintain proper body condition and performance.

Here are some general management tips for beef cattle management during the winter months from the University of Arkansa...
12/01/2020

Here are some general management tips for beef cattle management during the winter months from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture - Extension (UAEX) Animal Science Department - https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/animals-forages

• Winter is a good opportunity to catch up on equipment maintenance including lubrication and fluid change of tractors; packing wheel bearings on trailering equipment; checking tires on trailers, field equipment, etc.; and replacing floors in stock trailers.

• During December, some days are better spent indoors than outdoors. Now is the time to summarize herd records for the year and compare to previous year to determine the production direction of the herd. Valuable summaries include changes in 205-day adjusted weaning weights, monthly calving distributions, culling percentages, calf crop percentages, cow age and body condition and calving interval changes.

• December is a good month to summarize your financial records. Determine your cost for mineral, supplemental feed, vet medicine, fertilizer, hay, weed control, etc. Knowing your cost to maintain a cow per year is very important and will aid in marketing decisions.

• Make next year's budget and production plans.

• Proper free choice mineral and fresh water is just as important in the winter time as in the summer time.

• Do not use frost-damaged Johnsongrass as pasture for seven days after the first killing frost. Delay pasturing for at least seven days or until the frosted material is completely dried out and brown in color. The frost-wilted Johnsongrass may contain prussic acid which can cause sudden death in cattle.

• Deworm cattle to prevent weight loss and inefficient use of hay and feed supplements going into the winter. For most locations in Arkansas the weather this past summer and fall were ideal for parasites and therefore cattle are probably carrying higher numbers than normal.

• Monitor cattle closely for signs of respiratory disease. The large variations in temperature in the fall can contribute to decreases in respiratory immune function which may lead to pneumonia.

• Exclude cattle from access to oak trees whenever possible. Acorns are falling and are toxic to cattle causing kidney damage and death.

Are you working from home? You may have company. There may be insects working from home with you! The first study to eva...
11/30/2020
Researchers Find Hundreds of Arthropod Species in U.S. Homes

Are you working from home? You may have company. There may be insects working from home with you! The first study to evaluate the biodiversity of arthropods in U.S. homes has found that humans share their houses with more than 500 different kinds of arthropods such as insects, spiders, mites, and centipedes. But don't worry, the vast majority of the arthropods we found in homes were either peaceful cohabitants — like the cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) found in 65% of all rooms sampled — or accidental visitors, like midges and leafhoppers (Cicadellidae).

The first study to evaluate the biodiversity of arthropods in U.S. homes has found that humans share their houses with more than 500 different kinds of arthropods such as insects, …

In recent months, The National Agricultural Law Center has worked to keep farmers, consultants and other members of the ...
11/24/2020
As dicamba’s future continues to shift, National Agricultural Law Center keeps growers apprised

In recent months, The National Agricultural Law Center has worked to keep farmers, consultants and other members of the agricultural community up-to-date with ongoing changes through a series of blog posts under the title, “The Deal With Dicamba.”

Read more: https://bit.ly/3pVzY25.

In recent months, the National Agricultural Law Center has worked to keep farmers, consultants and other members of the agricultural community up-to-date with ongoing changes through a series of blog posts under the title, “The Deal With Dicamba.”

Address

400 Laurel St, Ste 215
Texarkana, AR
71854

General information

We are part of the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service's statewide network and the University of Arkansas System's Division of Agriculture. Our mission is to provide research-based information through non-formal education to help all Arkansans improve their economic well-being and the quality of lives. Whether it is agriculture, 4-H, health and living, or community development, the Miller County Extension Office is at your service.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(870) 779-3609

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Comments

What causes this on my peach tree? My peaches was like this last year. Found only 2 peaches so far this year with this stuff. Plz help!
How do I get rid of sticker weeds?
In North Carolina, we have these same little critters...just thought I'd pass this information along
Could you repost the info on spurweed again please! Thanks
What is this and how do I get rid of it??
Can't find articles on stump removal. Help
Can anyone tell me why my cucumbers are turning out like this?