UAEX - Miller County Agriculture

UAEX - Miller County Agriculture Miller County Agriculture offers research based information on all aspects of agriculture, horticulture, row crops, livestock, plant & tree health, etc.

06/26/2019
LSU Veterinarians Get Pedro the Turtle Moving

Pedro the box turtle has faced some challenges, but thanks to some innovative vets at LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, he's rolling with the punches. As they say in Louisiana, "Laissez les bons temps rouler!" 🐢

Pedro the turtle has learned to roll with it, thanks to the zoological medicine service at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s Veterinary Teaching Hospit...

Extension apiculturist Jon Zawislak says 'sweat bees' got their name because they are attracted to perspiration, often l...
06/26/2019

Extension apiculturist Jon Zawislak says 'sweat bees' got their name because they are attracted to perspiration, often landing on the arms of people working outside. Usually gently, these bees do have a minor sting, but rarely use it unless provoked. If a sweat bee lands on your skin, simply blow on it rather than try to slap at it.

You're working outside, in the garden, around the farm. Suddenly, a small bug lands in the crease of your arm. That familiar sting of summer, now you feel it behind your knees. Your salty skin is just so irresistible to the sweat bees. 🥵🐝

Extension apiculturist Jon Zawislak says sweat bees are a large family of bees called Halictidae. They are found all over the world, and a number occur in Arkansas. They have many diverse habits and behaviors that vary across the group. They may be dark in color or striped, but quite a few have a bright blue or green metallic appearance. Some have an iridescent thorax with a distinct black and yellow striped abdomen.

They are commonly called 'sweat bees" because they are attracted to perspiration, often landing on the arms of people working outside. Usually gently, these bees do have a minor sting, but rarely use it unless provoked. If a sweat bee lands on your skin, simply blow on it rather than try to slap at it.

Halictid bees are mostly solitary, nesting alone in the ground, although some species nest close together gregariously, and a few form truly social groups like bumble bees. Most of them can be important pollinators on native plants, and busily collect pollen to provision their young in underground nests.

Attending a training on successfully using viruses for insect control in your operation.
06/25/2019

Attending a training on successfully using viruses for insect control in your operation.

Doing a lot of scouting today. Looking at our soybean verification field, corn variety trial, and checking producer's pa...
06/24/2019

Doing a lot of scouting today. Looking at our soybean verification field, corn variety trial, and checking producer's pasture for armyworms. We didn't find any armyworms but there have been some reports coming out of Sevier County that they have them, so start checking your fields and be ready. Call if you have questions. 870-779-3609

“Storm season in Arkansas means that hay probably will never be cut at the right time,” said Dirk Philipp, associate pro...
06/24/2019

“Storm season in Arkansas means that hay probably will never be cut at the right time,” said Dirk Philipp, associate professor-animal science, for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. “Don’t despair if you didn’t have chance to get all your fescue hay in.”

Tall fescue hay should be cut at boot/early bloom, he said, but this window can be hard to hit with the frequency of wet weather. https://bit.ly/2J2splt

UAEX Plant Health Clinic
06/24/2019

UAEX Plant Health Clinic

Tomato

The two most important caterpillar pests of tomato are the Tomato Fruitworm, and Tomato Hornworm. Tomato Fruitworms, Helicoverpa zea, are destructive pests of several crops The adults are medium-sized moths, pale tan to brown with a dark spot in the center of the fore wing. They lay eggs singly on both surfaces of thetomato leaves. The eggs hatch as creamy white caterpillars with a dark head. As they grow they change color and can be shades of brown, pink, green, or black with alternating light and dark stripes running lengthwise on their bodies. The caterpillars begin feeding on the leaves, but move to the fruit as soon as green tomatoes appear. First noticeable on the fruit is a black hole at the base of the fruit stem. Inside the fruit, tunneling, frass and the worm may be found when the fruit is cut open. When the larvae reach full size, they migrate out of the fruit, fall to the ground and pupate. Adults emerge from the soil in 10-14 days and begin the cycle again. Control consists of scouting for the larvae and handpicking along with chemical controls if necessary. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is a naturally occurring bacterium that is fatal to caterpillars when ingested by them, but harmless to pets, people, and other types of insects. Other insecticides may be used including Baythroid, or Brigade, or Sevin, or Excel, or Coragen, or Voliam Xpress, or Asana, or Belt, or Synapse, or Lannate, or Intrepid, or SpinTor, or Confirm, or Mustang Maxx, or Hero. Homeowners may use Bt, or Ortho Flower, Fruit, & Vegetable Insect Killer, or Ortho Bug-B-Gon Insect Killer for Lawns and Gardens, Sevin, or Spectracide Insect Control for Gardens, or permethrins, or spinosad. Chemical control is ineffective once the fruitworm enters the fruit.
The Tomato Hornworm, Manduca quinquemaculata, the five-spotted hawkmoth, is a large brown and gray hawk moth. The green caterpillar blends so well with tomato foliage, that growers often have no idea the pest is present until they discover an almost compeletely defoliated plant. The best method of control is handpicking once they are observed. However, all the chemical controls for the fruitworm are also effective for the hornworm.

Did you know that bumble bees wings beat 130 times per second to vibrate flowers to release more pollen? Simply amazing!...
06/22/2019

Did you know that bumble bees wings beat 130 times per second to vibrate flowers to release more pollen? Simply amazing! U.S. Forest Service

Did you know that the largest number of human-caused wildfires is a result of careless debris burning? Household trash s...
06/22/2019

Did you know that the largest number of human-caused wildfires is a result of careless debris burning?

Household trash should only be burned in a burn barrel or other trash container equipped with a screen or metal grid to keep burning material contained. Great information from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service here: http://ow.ly/ifjh50unP2U

Yellow jackets are probably among the most feared of the flying, stinging insects and for good reason. Seeing nests like...
06/21/2019
Massive Yellow Jacket Nests Appearing Again In Alabama - Alabama Cooperative Extension System

Yellow jackets are probably among the most feared of the flying, stinging insects and for good reason. Seeing nests like these would strike terror in most people's minds. However, yellow jackets are considered beneficial insects, but are not among the ranks of important pollinators. Yellow jackets primarily feed on larvae of other insects and potential crop pests, but they don't visit flowers much. Due to their lack of body fuzz and pollen basket, they're inefficient pollinators. #PollinatorWeek 🐝🐝

A colony of yellow jackets the size of a car. Imagine more than 90 of them. It happened in 2006. Alabama Extension entomologist says 2019 may mirror 2006.

Strong winds from the storms last night snapped about 6 of these poles off of 82 as you drop off the hill.
06/20/2019

Strong winds from the storms last night snapped about 6 of these poles off of 82 as you drop off the hill.

Working with a producer this afternoon on sprigging and sprigged Bermuda. Weeds can definitely be a battle but definitel...
06/20/2019

Working with a producer this afternoon on sprigging and sprigged Bermuda. Weeds can definitely be a battle but definitely worth the fight.

⁉️ Did you know that a one-inch storm on a 1,000 foot roof generates over 600 gallons of free, soft, non-chlorinated rai...
06/20/2019
www.uaex.edu

⁉️ Did you know that a one-inch storm on a 1,000 foot roof generates over 600 gallons of free, soft, non-chlorinated rainwater 🌦️? Capturing even a fraction of this volume in rain barrels can serve as a cost-effective alternative to using
tap water for watering landscapes and gardens, 🌺🌼🍆🍅🌱 especially in the summer 🥵 months when Arkansas is prone to drought. https://bit.ly/2WVu8hw

Do you know the differences between a peach and a nectarine?
06/18/2019

Do you know the differences between a peach and a nectarine?

"What is the difference between a peach and a nectarine?"
Because nectarines have smooth skin like a plum, some people think they are a cross between a peach and a plum. But they are not! Nectarines are actually a genetic mutation of a peach. A nectarine is just a peach with smooth skin instead of one with fuzzy skin. Otherwise, they are very similar in most other characteristics, and are in the same genus and species, Prunus persica. Slight differences in flavor and brown rot susceptibility exist also. Otherwise they are produced the same culturally.

Peach and nectarine production has several limitations for commercial producers and is especially limited for home producers. The first limitation is crop reduction from spring frosts which have been common in the last 15-20 years in Arkansas. Secondly, pest control is critical, as peaches and nectarines are very susceptible to numerous insects and diseases. Critical diseases include brown rot, peach scab and bacterial spot, and major insects are oriental fruit moth and peach tree borer. Thus spraying with fungicides and insecticides is required to produce a crop in most years. If no spraying is intended, then it is best to not consider these crops for production.

The University of Arkansas has been developing peach and nectarine cultivars since the late 1960s, and several cultivars have been released. This developmental work was done at the Fruit Research Station at Clarksville, so all dates of bloom or harvest are based on data collected at that location. The University of Arkansas patented nectarine and fresh-market peach cultivars are available from licensed fruit propagators at this link: https://www.uaex.edu/farm-ranch/crops-commercial-horticulture/horticulture/docs/UofA-Fruit-Patent-Licensed-Propagators.pdf

Over the next few days I will showcase some of the releases from our fruit breeding program.

Just a reminder to be careful when putting up hay a little green.
06/18/2019

Just a reminder to be careful when putting up hay a little green.

Here's a little FYI to those getting this year's hay crop in the barn.

These photos were posted last year by the Teutopolis Fire Protection District (Illinois). What appeared to be "great looking hay" when it was put up, almost turned into a disaster...

Here's what the Fire Dept. had to say...

"Are you a farmer in Teutopolis Fire Protection District who has put up hay within the last few weeks? If so, have or do you check the bales daily, if not hourly if they were put up wet?
Today we went to a location where the property owner had someone come out to their farm and used a temperature probe to check bales. They got a reading of 180 degrees, but couldn’t visually see any smoke or fire. They began moving bales out of the barn and called the fire department.
We stood by while they moved bales in case the “hot” bales ignited once they got enough oxygen. Luckily none caught fire, but were very hot to the touch.
We rarely get to see this side of a hay bale fire as it’s normally on fire when we get called. Pictures show the state that the bales were at and how close the property owner came to losing hundreds of hay bales and a barn."

Thanks for liking & sharing https://www.facebook.com/diynets/

**Edited to add Temperature chart**
**Edited to announce Hay tester availability**

Checking on our soybean verification field and corn variety trial today. Thanks to Monte Wisseman for your help today dr...
06/17/2019

Checking on our soybean verification field and corn variety trial today. Thanks to Monte Wisseman for your help today driving t-posts!

Today kicks off #PollinatorWeek, a time to focus on the crucial role pollinators play in our existence. 🐝🦋🐦🦇The Arkansas...
06/17/2019
Arkansas Pollinator Stewardship Program | Beekeepers and farmers working together

Today kicks off #PollinatorWeek, a time to focus on the crucial role pollinators play in our existence. 🐝🦋🐦🦇
The Arkansas Pollinator Stewardship Program is an effort between the the Division of Agriculture, regulatory agencies, ag industries, and farmers. The program seeks to establish better communication and cooperation among applicators and producers to ensure the health of honeybees in row crop production areas. Find out more or enroll in the program on our website.

The Arkansas Pollinator Stewardship Program will seek to minimize economic losses for both farmers and beekeepers by adequately managing row crop pests while minimizing impact of pesticides on honey bee colonies.

Did you know that these galls get their name “Jumping galls” because when they drop off the leaves to the ground the lar...
06/17/2019

Did you know that these galls get their name “Jumping galls” because when they drop off the leaves to the ground the larvae inside hit the insides of the gall causing it to jump in an effort to find crevices in which to overwinter.

Oak

Galls on oaks may be caused by gall wasps, or gall midges. Oak Phylloxera cause leaf distortion. Multiple samples of heavily galled oak leaves have been arriving at the Plant Health Clinic with Jumping Oak Gall. Spots with a brown center, purple margin, and a yellow halo appear on the upper leaf surface. A tiny gall, the size of a pin head is found on the underside of the leaf. Heavily encrusted leaves turn brown and can die and prematurely fall from the tree. The Jumping Oak Gall is caused by Neuropterus saltatorius, a tiny dark wasp belonging to the Cynipid group of wasps. These small wasps are harmless to people. The Jumping Oak Gall has two generations a year. Females emerge in the spring from the ground and lay eggs on the leaves. The eggs hatch, male and females mate, and the females lay eggs, resulting in the second generation galls. The galls get their name “Jumping galls” because when they drop off the leaves to the ground the larvae inside hit the insides of the gall causing it to jump in an effort to find crevices in which to overwinter. Gall wasps do no lasting harm to healthy mature trees. There are about 600 species of gall wasps in the United States. Depending on the species, roots, stems, twigs, leaves, buds, or flowers are attacked. The galls are formed as a response to the wasp’s laying an egg on the plant tissue, stimulating the plant to produce the gall in response to the injury. The result is food and shelter for the wasp larvae that live protected inside the gall. Lawn insecticides may reduce populations since these small wasps spend part of their life cycle in the ground.

Are you concerned about bees digging burrows in your yard? Ground bees become active in early spring. They dig nests int...
06/15/2019
www.uaex.edu

Are you concerned about bees digging burrows in your yard? Ground bees become active in early spring. They dig nests in
the ground, often in bare patches of the lawn or garden. If you find mounds of soil, similar to anthills but with larger openings, these may be ground bee nests. Watch for bees flying low
over the ground and entering their burrows. Ground bees perform an important role as pollinators and, as such, are considered beneficial insects. Read more about ground bees here: https://bit.ly/2MJtXWE

While these 2 landscape shrubs have similar appearance and they tend to be in bloom at the same time, the two plants dif...
06/14/2019

While these 2 landscape shrubs have similar appearance and they tend to be in bloom at the same time, the two plants differ in many ways.

The chaste tree (Vitex agnus castus) is often mistakenly referred to as a butterfly bush (Buddleia davidii). These two landscape shrubs have similar appearance in flower shape and structure, and they tend to be in bloom at the same time further creating confusion, but the two plants differ in many ways.

Read up on each plant to learn more about their similarities and differences, and suitability for your home garden:

➡️ http://bit.ly/UAEX_Vitex_chaste_tree
➡️ http://bit.ly/UAEX_Buddleia_butterfly_bush

Baxter County Cooperative Extension - Agriculture
06/14/2019

Baxter County Cooperative Extension - Agriculture

Got aphids?

Every single tomato plant that has come through the door this past week has had an aphid problem. Aphids feed by piercing into the plant tissues and then sucking out the nutrient rich plant sap. Tomatoes can typically handle a large population of aphids before they start to affect the yielding ability of the plant, but a severe problem can cause leaf curling and ultimately stunt the plants. They are also thought to serve as a vector for cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) which affects many garden plants.

Many times, insecticidal control isn't needed. They've got plenty of natural predators, including lady bugs and some wasps. However, if an application is warranted, there are many options, including insecticidal soap that can be used as an organic option. Regardless of the product, good coverage is necessary, and it is important to follow all label directions regarding application rates, number of applications allowed, and pre-harvest intervals.

Saturday, June 15, 2019 is the GRAND OPENING of the Gateway Farmers Market in Texarkana AR. Come out and get some fresh,...
06/14/2019

Saturday, June 15, 2019 is the GRAND OPENING of the Gateway Farmers Market in Texarkana AR. Come out and get some fresh, locally grown produce, grain fed meats, baked goods, crafts, plants and more.

There will be lots of giveaways. Bring your kids as UAEX - Miller County 4-H will have a kids' craft for them to participate in. Miller County Red Dirt Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer any gardening questions you might have.

If you haven't been out so far this season, they have new shades in red, white and blue.

Address

400 Laurel St, Ste 215
Texarkana, AR
71854

General information

We are part of the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service's statewide network and the University of Arkansas System's Division of Agriculture. Our mission is to provide research-based information through non-formal education to help all Arkansans improve their economic well-being and the quality of lives. Whether it is agriculture, 4-H, health and living, or community development, the Miller County Extension Office is at your service.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:00 - 16:30
Thursday 08:00 - 16:30
Friday 08:00 - 16:30

Telephone

(870) 779-3609

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