Porter County Stormwater Management

Porter County Stormwater Management The Department of Development and Storm Water Management helps resolve drainage problems, improve water quality, reduce flood damage and much more to keep Porter County's water clean.
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What is Storm Water? Water from rain, snow and ice that runs off your roof, across your driveway, through your yard, and down the street has to go somewhere. That’s where The Department of Development and Storm Water Management comes in. As storm water flows over the land, it has to be directed into a ditch, stream, lake, or river through inlets and storm sewers. Along the way to these waterways, the storm water picks up sediment, nutrients, pesticides, trash, debris, and other pollutants that can impact these receiving water bodies. We use infrastructures to control and minimize the negative impacts of storm water runoff on our communities and water resources. A typical storm water management system includes:
- inlets to collect storm water from the land
- storm sewers to convey water to detention basins
- a detention basin, where the storm water can be managed and treated, before it goes downstream
- ditch, stream, lake, or river -- the storm water runoff’s final destination

In order to properly address the impacts of storm water, we need both, storm water management program and the efforts of individual landowners. We have many different projects in unincorporated Porter County to resolve drainage problems, improve water quality, reduce flood damages, and maintaining and enhancing the county’s valuable storm water infrastructure. Have A Drainage Concern? If you have a storm water management and/or drainage concerns, please fill our Storm Water Concern Reporting Form on our website. We will look into it as soon as we can. Thank you!

Operating as usual

04/15/2021

Experiencing small ponds in your yard? This recommended Storm Water Management practice is an environmental responsibility. Short-term ponding that lasts up to 72 hours reduces runoff volumes and soil eroding velocities, plus replenishes the ground water table for reuse. If the pond causes storm water runoff to enter or prevent access to your home, drown vegetation for too long, or flow fast enough to scour away the soil, then ponding could be a problem. However, most of the time, those temporary little ponds are good for the environment.

Experiencing small ponds in your yard? This recommended Storm Water Management practice is an environmental responsibility. Short-term ponding that lasts up to 72 hours reduces runoff volumes and soil eroding velocities, plus replenishes the ground water table for reuse. If the pond causes storm water runoff to enter or prevent access to your home, drown vegetation for too long, or flow fast enough to scour away the soil, then ponding could be a problem. However, most of the time, those temporary little ponds are good for the environment.

04/08/2021

Project Update: The Baltimore Road storm water improvement project is in progress. This 54-inch concrete pipe will replace one of the last remaining segments of the deteriorated corrugated metal pipe storm sewer in the subdivision. As of today, the pipe installation is nearly complete. Stay tuned for what's next…

*This photo was taken at the beginning stages of pipe installation*

Project Update: The Baltimore Road storm water improvement project is in progress. This 54-inch concrete pipe will replace one of the last remaining segments of the deteriorated corrugated metal pipe storm sewer in the subdivision. As of today, the pipe installation is nearly complete. Stay tuned for what's next…

*This photo was taken at the beginning stages of pipe installation*

04/07/2021

Earlier this year, we installed pipes at Bauer Ditch. This drain tile reconstruction project will help resolve prolonged periods of standing water north of Highway 6 and improve drainage. Watch how we did it!

04/06/2021

We had our first of the month board meeting this morning where we discussed our projects, spending and announcements. Our other two meetings this month are open to the public. Masks are required and we're practicing social distancing. If you'd like to stay in the loop of these meetings online, check out our agendas: http://www.portercountystormwater.org/203/Agendas-Minutes

We had our first of the month board meeting this morning where we discussed our projects, spending and announcements. Our other two meetings this month are open to the public. Masks are required and we're practicing social distancing. If you'd like to stay in the loop of these meetings online, check out our agendas: http://www.portercountystormwater.org/203/Agendas-Minutes

04/01/2021

Do you have standing water in your lawn? Groundwater could be the reason! When groundwater, the level of saturated soil, cannot accept any more water, usually during a rain event, the water is then stored in the unsaturated soil, between the soil particles. As the groundwater rises, the amount of unsaturated soil is smaller. This means that there are fewer areas that can store water and less water will seep into the soil from the surface. Therefore, you may experience standing water as the result of higher groundwater.

03/30/2021

Did you know… The water table is typically at its highest elevation in springtime. An underground boundary between the dry soil layer and where the ground water level naturally exists, the water table can fluctuate depending on the season. For example, snow melts and rain events occur in the spring, rising the water table level. Stay tuned to learn how this can affect your home!

Did you know… The water table is typically at its highest elevation in springtime. An underground boundary between the dry soil layer and where the ground water level naturally exists, the water table can fluctuate depending on the season. For example, snow melts and rain events occur in the spring, rising the water table level. Stay tuned to learn how this can affect your home!

03/25/2021

Need assistance with submitting a storm water concern? Watch this video to learn how to successfully fill out and submit your concern!

03/23/2021

Do you have a storm water concern? Fill out our easy-to-use form online! This nifty feature sends your storm water concern directly to our office, in order for us to follow up with you. If you notice flooding after a storm event, it's best to wait at least 24 hours, allowing the storm water system to catch up. Visit http://www.portercountystormwater.org and click the icon named "Report a Concern" to get started!

Do you have a storm water concern? Fill out our easy-to-use form online! This nifty feature sends your storm water concern directly to our office, in order for us to follow up with you. If you notice flooding after a storm event, it's best to wait at least 24 hours, allowing the storm water system to catch up. Visit http://www.portercountystormwater.org and click the icon named "Report a Concern" to get started!

Indiana is issuing NEW storm water quality permits! What does this mean for Porter County? Some updates to the county or...
03/17/2021

Indiana is issuing NEW storm water quality permits! What does this mean for Porter County? Some updates to the county ordinances and our storm water program may include storm water education, good housekeeping practices and BMPs (best management practices) on construction sites. Stay tuned to see what's coming your way!

Indiana is issuing NEW storm water quality permits! What does this mean for Porter County? Some updates to the county ordinances and our storm water program may include storm water education, good housekeeping practices and BMPs (best management practices) on construction sites. Stay tuned to see what's coming your way!

Phase II of Old South Haven Squirrel Creek Diversion Project is underway! Partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Enginee...
03/15/2021

Phase II of Old South Haven Squirrel Creek Diversion Project is underway! Partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters, approximately 800 linear feet of channel improvements will redirect overflow from Squirrel Creek to this flood storage basin at South Haven Elementary School. These enhancements will increase water transportation and provide much needed flood relief to Squirrel Creek's neighborhood.

Phase II of Old South Haven Squirrel Creek Diversion Project is underway! Partnering with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Headquarters, approximately 800 linear feet of channel improvements will redirect overflow from Squirrel Creek to this flood storage basin at South Haven Elementary School. These enhancements will increase water transportation and provide much needed flood relief to Squirrel Creek's neighborhood.

03/11/2021

Rain is on the way! As we head into the wet season, water can leak into your basement. To help with that, we've gathered a few tips to improve drainage away from your house.

What is a SWPPP? A site-specific plan, SWPPP or Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan identifies activities and conditio...
03/09/2021

What is a SWPPP? A site-specific plan, SWPPP or Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan identifies activities and conditions onsite that can cause pollution, then details the ways the project owner will prevent this pollution from occurring. Many construction projects as well as all MS4-operated facilities, such as a warehouse that stores salts, oils, chemicals and other harmful discharges, are required to have a SWPPP. Educating workers and employees on these best management practices (BMPs) grow the storm water knowledge and increase success for preventing pollution sources.

What is a SWPPP? A site-specific plan, SWPPP or Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan identifies activities and conditions onsite that can cause pollution, then details the ways the project owner will prevent this pollution from occurring. Many construction projects as well as all MS4-operated facilities, such as a warehouse that stores salts, oils, chemicals and other harmful discharges, are required to have a SWPPP. Educating workers and employees on these best management practices (BMPs) grow the storm water knowledge and increase success for preventing pollution sources.

New project at Baltimore Road in Old South Haven Subdivision! On top of a complete road reconstruction, we plan to repla...
03/04/2021

New project at Baltimore Road in Old South Haven Subdivision! On top of a complete road reconstruction, we plan to replace one of the last remaining segments of the deteriorated corrugated metal pipe storm sewer in the subdivision. As usual, proper erosion and sediment control measures will be installed and maintained for the length of this project to protect our storm water quality.

New project at Baltimore Road in Old South Haven Subdivision! On top of a complete road reconstruction, we plan to replace one of the last remaining segments of the deteriorated corrugated metal pipe storm sewer in the subdivision. As usual, proper erosion and sediment control measures will be installed and maintained for the length of this project to protect our storm water quality.

STARTING SOON! We will begin working on regrading and reshaping Ludington Ditch, Arm 19 from County Road 450 S to the ju...
03/03/2021

STARTING SOON! We will begin working on regrading and reshaping Ludington Ditch, Arm 19 from County Road 450 S to the junction of two ditches, in addition to removing and replacing a culvert, which is the small channel that directs storm water runoff. These improvements allow for drainage through the ditch, while also providing a functioning outlet for the surrounding properties and upstream drain tiles.

STARTING SOON! We will begin working on regrading and reshaping Ludington Ditch, Arm 19 from County Road 450 S to the junction of two ditches, in addition to removing and replacing a culvert, which is the small channel that directs storm water runoff. These improvements allow for drainage through the ditch, while also providing a functioning outlet for the surrounding properties and upstream drain tiles.

02/25/2021

How many wetlands are in your neighborhood? Using the U.S. Fish & Wildlife's Wetland Inventory for the best available data, you can see just how communities, from Valparaiso to Porter, interact with wetlands. Visit
https://www.fws.gov/wetlands/data/mapper.html to find more locations!

Phase 2 is in the works! The long-term drainage issues at Windy Oaks Subdivision will soon be no more! In this phase, we...
02/24/2021

Phase 2 is in the works! The long-term drainage issues at Windy Oaks Subdivision will soon be no more! In this phase, we will install a new storm sewer, along with storm sewer structures and enhancements to the existing detention basin for better water flow. Keep an eye out for our progress on this project!

Phase 2 is in the works! The long-term drainage issues at Windy Oaks Subdivision will soon be no more! In this phase, we will install a new storm sewer, along with storm sewer structures and enhancements to the existing detention basin for better water flow. Keep an eye out for our progress on this project!

02/23/2021

Where does snow go? Back into our streams and rivers! The water runoff from melting snow carries the excess ice melt and other pollutants from sidewalks, driveways and streets to our natural water ways. This can potentially harm the fragile aquatic ecosystem and contaminate our drinking water. As the snow continues to melt, let's work together to improve our water quality!

Want clean and clear water? So do we! Since 2016, we've worked with residents, property owners association and others ad...
02/22/2021

Want clean and clear water? So do we! Since 2016, we've worked with residents, property owners association and others adding more than 20 MILES of storm sewers, drain tiles, ditches and streams to Porter County's public storm water infrastructure. These additions, like Sandy Hook Ditch, Branch 1, help us solve existing water management problems and pursue having cleaner water for everyone!

Want clean and clear water? So do we! Since 2016, we've worked with residents, property owners association and others adding more than 20 MILES of storm sewers, drain tiles, ditches and streams to Porter County's public storm water infrastructure. These additions, like Sandy Hook Ditch, Branch 1, help us solve existing water management problems and pursue having cleaner water for everyone!

Construction has started at Bauer Ditch! This drain tile reconstruction project will improve drainage and flood conditio...
02/18/2021

Construction has started at Bauer Ditch! This drain tile reconstruction project will improve drainage and flood conditions north of Highway 6, where standing water occurs. First, we are clearing trees and excavating the channel at the outfall to clear a path for a storm sewer pipe. Stay tuned for more…

Construction has started at Bauer Ditch! This drain tile reconstruction project will improve drainage and flood conditions north of Highway 6, where standing water occurs. First, we are clearing trees and excavating the channel at the outfall to clear a path for a storm sewer pipe. Stay tuned for more…

Did you know… We have lost almost 84% of our wetlands here in Indiana! Ranging from bogs and wet prairies to cypress swa...
02/17/2021

Did you know… We have lost almost 84% of our wetlands here in Indiana! Ranging from bogs and wet prairies to cypress swamps and marshes, wetlands used to cover 5.6 million acres of the state. Over the past 200 years, wetlands have been converted into farms, cities and roads until approximately 16% of Indiana's wetlands remain. Learn more about wetlands and what they do for the environment and YOU: https://www.in.gov/idem/wetlands/2335.htm

Did you know… We have lost almost 84% of our wetlands here in Indiana! Ranging from bogs and wet prairies to cypress swamps and marshes, wetlands used to cover 5.6 million acres of the state. Over the past 200 years, wetlands have been converted into farms, cities and roads until approximately 16% of Indiana's wetlands remain. Learn more about wetlands and what they do for the environment and YOU: https://www.in.gov/idem/wetlands/2335.htm

Working at the Shorewood Forest infrastructure study! After reaching out to Shorewood residents, we're taking a closer l...
02/15/2021

Working at the Shorewood Forest infrastructure study! After reaching out to Shorewood residents, we're taking a closer look at their drainage concerns which will help us identify future projects. Our next step will be mapping out and examining structures, pipes and ravines, in addition to televising the entire Shorewood storm sewer network. A big shout out to Christopher B. Burke Engineering, LLC for managing this project!

Working at the Shorewood Forest infrastructure study! After reaching out to Shorewood residents, we're taking a closer look at their drainage concerns which will help us identify future projects. Our next step will be mapping out and examining structures, pipes and ravines, in addition to televising the entire Shorewood storm sewer network. A big shout out to Christopher B. Burke Engineering, LLC for managing this project!

What are wetlands? Home to a wide range of plants and animals, wetlands are continually flooded by the surfacing of grou...
02/11/2021

What are wetlands? Home to a wide range of plants and animals, wetlands are continually flooded by the surfacing of ground water. As a natural water retention source, they are essential in improving water quality and retaining storm water runoff during a rain event. Wetlands aid our work in flood prevention and water purification, which is already a significant and costly undertaking. Without wetlands protections, we would have even more work to do, leading to higher costs.

What are wetlands? Home to a wide range of plants and animals, wetlands are continually flooded by the surfacing of ground water. As a natural water retention source, they are essential in improving water quality and retaining storm water runoff during a rain event. Wetlands aid our work in flood prevention and water purification, which is already a significant and costly undertaking. Without wetlands protections, we would have even more work to do, leading to higher costs.

02/10/2021

We've reached substantial completion on restoring the storm sewer system in Old South Haven Subdivision! Nearly 100 crumbling storm sewer structures, including inlets, catch basins and manholes, PLUS almost 3 miles of decades old and deteriorated storm sewer were repaired with cast-in-place pipe. See the transformation for yourself!

Many streams, pipes, and drainageways across unincorporated Porter County are owned and maintained by private property o...
02/04/2021

Many streams, pipes, and drainageways across unincorporated Porter County are owned and maintained by private property owners, even though they serve the public. Legal agreements, known as drainage easements, grant the Department the ability to maintain this infrastructure and makes it a part of Porter County’s system of public stormwater infrastructure. Adding pieces to the County’s public stormwater infrastructure depends on the cooperation of individual property owners, but ultimately helps us all reduce flooding, address drainage problems, and enhance water quality.

Many streams, pipes, and drainageways across unincorporated Porter County are owned and maintained by private property owners, even though they serve the public. Legal agreements, known as drainage easements, grant the Department the ability to maintain this infrastructure and makes it a part of Porter County’s system of public stormwater infrastructure. Adding pieces to the County’s public stormwater infrastructure depends on the cooperation of individual property owners, but ultimately helps us all reduce flooding, address drainage problems, and enhance water quality.

Address

155 Indiana Ave, Suite 311
Valparaiso, IN
46383

Opening Hours

Monday 08:30 - 16:30
Tuesday 08:30 - 16:30
Wednesday 08:30 - 16:30
Thursday 08:30 - 16:30
Friday 08:30 - 16:30

Telephone

+12194653530

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What is Storm Water?

Water from rain, snow and ice that runs off your roof, across your driveway, through your yard, and down the street has to go somewhere. That’s where The Department of Development and Storm Water Management comes in. As storm water flows over the land, it has to be directed into a ditch, stream, lake, or river through inlets and storm sewers. Along the way to these waterways, the storm water picks up sediment, nutrients, pesticides, trash, debris, and other pollutants that can impact these receiving water bodies. We use infrastructures to control and minimize the negative impacts of storm water runoff on our communities and water resources.

A typical storm water management system includes:


  • inlets to collect storm water from the land

  • storm sewers to convey water to detention basins
  • Nearby government services


    Other Valparaiso government services

    Show All