Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS

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Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/digital/social-media.htm The National Park Service preserves, protects, and shares our nation's special places and stories. http://www.nps.gov

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/digital/social-media.htm The National Park Service preserves, protects, and shares our nation's special places and stories. http://www.nps.gov

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Reminder of some important dates for those participating in the 2021 Leicester B. Holland Prize: A Single-Sheet Measured...
09/09/2021

Reminder of some important dates for those participating in the 2021 Leicester B. Holland Prize: A Single-Sheet Measured Drawing Competition.

15 September is the final date that HABS/HAER/HALS staff will review drafts of drawings and (optional) historical reports.

ABOUT
The Leicester B. Holland Prize is an annual competition, open to both students and professionals, that recognizes the best single-sheet measured drawing of an historic building, site, or structure prepared to Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) or Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) standards for inclusion in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection at The Library of Congress.

The prize honors Leicester B. Holland (1882-1952), FAIA, chairman of The American Institute of Architects' (AIA) Committee on Historic Buildings, head of the Fine Arts Division of The Library of Congress, first curator of the HABS collection, co-founder of the HABS program in the 1930s, and the first chair of the HABS Advisory Board.

PRIZES
The winner of the 2021 Holland Prize will receive a $1,000 cash prize, a certificate of recognition, and publication of the winning drawing in "Preservation Architect", the online newsletter of the AIA's Historic Resources Committee. Merit awards may also be given.

FEE
There is NO COST to enter the competition.

SCHEDULE
1 September: Deadline for submission of entry forms
15 September: Final date that HABS/HAER/HALS staff will review drafts of drawings and (optional) historical reports
1 October: Postmark/Email deadline for submission of completed entries
Autumn: Prize winners announced

LEARN MORE
For information on how to participate, rules and recommendations, submission guidelines, judging and rating scale and the previous winning drawings of the competition, on the Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS website at https://www.nps.gov/hdp/competitions/holland.htm

IMAGE CAPTION: The 2021 Leicester B. Holland Prize advertising poster prominently displays the 2020 winning drawing: Louisiana State University, Bus Stop Shelter (HABS LA-1207-B), delineated by Guy W. Carwile, the Ken Hollis Endowed Professor in the College of Liberal Arts, School of Design, Architecture Program, Louisiana Tech University.

#Preservation #PreservationThroughDocumentation
#HABSnps #HAERnps #HALSnps #HollandPrize #HistoricBuildings #HistoricArchitecture #Engineering #LandscapeArchitecture #SavingPlaces #ThisPlaceMatters #Competitions #AIA #LOC #MeasuredDrawings #HistoricPreservation

Reminder of some important dates for those participating in the 2021 Leicester B. Holland Prize: A Single-Sheet Measured Drawing Competition.

15 September is the final date that HABS/HAER/HALS staff will review drafts of drawings and (optional) historical reports.

ABOUT
The Leicester B. Holland Prize is an annual competition, open to both students and professionals, that recognizes the best single-sheet measured drawing of an historic building, site, or structure prepared to Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) or Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) standards for inclusion in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection at The Library of Congress.

The prize honors Leicester B. Holland (1882-1952), FAIA, chairman of The American Institute of Architects' (AIA) Committee on Historic Buildings, head of the Fine Arts Division of The Library of Congress, first curator of the HABS collection, co-founder of the HABS program in the 1930s, and the first chair of the HABS Advisory Board.

PRIZES
The winner of the 2021 Holland Prize will receive a $1,000 cash prize, a certificate of recognition, and publication of the winning drawing in "Preservation Architect", the online newsletter of the AIA's Historic Resources Committee. Merit awards may also be given.

FEE
There is NO COST to enter the competition.

SCHEDULE
1 September: Deadline for submission of entry forms
15 September: Final date that HABS/HAER/HALS staff will review drafts of drawings and (optional) historical reports
1 October: Postmark/Email deadline for submission of completed entries
Autumn: Prize winners announced

LEARN MORE
For information on how to participate, rules and recommendations, submission guidelines, judging and rating scale and the previous winning drawings of the competition, on the Heritage Documentation Programs, NPS website at https://www.nps.gov/hdp/competitions/holland.htm

IMAGE CAPTION: The 2021 Leicester B. Holland Prize advertising poster prominently displays the 2020 winning drawing: Louisiana State University, Bus Stop Shelter (HABS LA-1207-B), delineated by Guy W. Carwile, the Ken Hollis Endowed Professor in the College of Liberal Arts, School of Design, Architecture Program, Louisiana Tech University.

#Preservation #PreservationThroughDocumentation
#HABSnps #HAERnps #HALSnps #HollandPrize #HistoricBuildings #HistoricArchitecture #Engineering #LandscapeArchitecture #SavingPlaces #ThisPlaceMatters #Competitions #AIA #LOC #MeasuredDrawings #HistoricPreservation

Check out this short video on #brutalism by Curbed.LEARN MORESee more examples of historic structures with brutalist arc...
09/09/2021
Curbed Hands-On Architecture Explainer Brutalism

Check out this short video on #brutalism by Curbed.

LEARN MORE
See more examples of historic structures with brutalist architectural elements in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection in The Library of Congress at https://go.usa.gov/xMaHW

#HABSnps #PreservationThroughDocumentation #PreservationEducation #HistoricArchitecture #Architecture #Concrete

Curbed explains the architectural style Brutalism using hand gestures and magic.Subscribe: http://bit.ly/CurbedYouTubeCurbed breathes life into real estate a...

Disston Mausoleum, elevation, looking southLaurel Hill Cemetery3822 Ridge AvenuePhiladelphia, Philadelphia County, PAJac...
09/08/2021

Disston Mausoleum, elevation, looking south

Laurel Hill Cemetery
3822 Ridge Avenue
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

Jack E. Boucher, Photographer, 1998-99

SIGNIFICANCE
Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery constitutes the second major rural #cemetery in the United States. Begun in 1836, it is the earliest known work of John Notman, an important nineteenth-century #architect and #landscapedesigner. Civil engineer and "rural architect" James C. Sidney also forged his landscape career at #LaurelHill. After laying out a southern addition to the grounds, he designed parks and cemeteries in Pennsylvania and New York. A third beneficiary of Laurel Hill was its principal founder, John Jay Smith. He guided the cemetery's planting and promotion, and in the process earned an influential voice in horticulture and cemetery management. As the common link between people who shaped America's metropolitan landscape, Laurel Hill deserves study. Yet the cemetery's significance extends well beyond an association with these individuals. In an era when cities suffered from crowding, disease, and scarcity of public space, Laurel Hill offered an "alternative environment." Amid clerical criticism and economic instability, the institution lured startling numbers of patrons and visitors. They came to experience artfully controlled nature; to see romantic #monuments and to build them; to mix piety and patriotism, education and entertainment. Cemetery literature promised all of these things. Nonetheless, the institution ultimately placed property rights above public access. As Laurel Hill's visitation statistics fueled the Victorian crusade for urban parks, lot-holders built higher fences and managers wrote more restrictive rules. Today Laurel Hill stands as a landmark in the history of American architecture, landscape, and marketing. Spawned by a New Jersey #Quaker's interest in horticulture, commemoration, and elite enterprise, it is an essay in #Victorian taste and mores.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of the Laurel Hill Cemetery in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/pa0961/

#HABSnps #Mausoleum #HistoricCemetery #Philadelphia #Pennsylvania #HistoricArchitecture

Disston Mausoleum, elevation, looking south

Laurel Hill Cemetery
3822 Ridge Avenue
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

Jack E. Boucher, Photographer, 1998-99

SIGNIFICANCE
Philadelphia's Laurel Hill Cemetery constitutes the second major rural #cemetery in the United States. Begun in 1836, it is the earliest known work of John Notman, an important nineteenth-century #architect and #landscapedesigner. Civil engineer and "rural architect" James C. Sidney also forged his landscape career at #LaurelHill. After laying out a southern addition to the grounds, he designed parks and cemeteries in Pennsylvania and New York. A third beneficiary of Laurel Hill was its principal founder, John Jay Smith. He guided the cemetery's planting and promotion, and in the process earned an influential voice in horticulture and cemetery management. As the common link between people who shaped America's metropolitan landscape, Laurel Hill deserves study. Yet the cemetery's significance extends well beyond an association with these individuals. In an era when cities suffered from crowding, disease, and scarcity of public space, Laurel Hill offered an "alternative environment." Amid clerical criticism and economic instability, the institution lured startling numbers of patrons and visitors. They came to experience artfully controlled nature; to see romantic #monuments and to build them; to mix piety and patriotism, education and entertainment. Cemetery literature promised all of these things. Nonetheless, the institution ultimately placed property rights above public access. As Laurel Hill's visitation statistics fueled the Victorian crusade for urban parks, lot-holders built higher fences and managers wrote more restrictive rules. Today Laurel Hill stands as a landmark in the history of American architecture, landscape, and marketing. Spawned by a New Jersey #Quaker's interest in horticulture, commemoration, and elite enterprise, it is an essay in #Victorian taste and mores.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of the Laurel Hill Cemetery in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/pa0961/

#HABSnps #Mausoleum #HistoricCemetery #Philadelphia #Pennsylvania #HistoricArchitecture

SOUTHWEST CORNER AND GORGE WALLFort PulaskiCockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GAOther Title: Fort Pulaski Nation...
09/08/2021

SOUTHWEST CORNER AND GORGE WALL
Fort Pulaski
Cockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GA
Other Title: Fort Pulaski National Monument

Jack Boucher, Photographer, August 1998

SIGNIFICANCE
Fort Pulaski was built in the second quarter of the nineteenth century by U.S. military engineers who hoped to guard against unwanted river approaches to the nearby port city of #Savannah. It was part of a chain of brick fortifications constructed up and down the east coast and represented the premier defense system of its time. Creating Fort Pulaski took one million dollars, 25 million bricks, and eighteen years of labor. When it was completed (1847), Fort Pulaski was considered invincible. The fort remained untested until the Civil War. In January 1861, the Confederate States of America seized the fort for its use and protection. Union forces targeted the fort in April 1862; yet the Confederates were unafraid of the coming bombardment. They placed their faith in the fort's solidarity. Moreover, the Union army, camped on #TybeeIsland, was over a mile away. However, the distance between the batteries and the fort was covered easily by the rifled cannon, that unbeknownst to the Confederacy, were capable of shattering the fort's 7 1/2 feet thick brick walls. By noon the following day, the walls of the fort were breached and the main powder magazine threatened. The Confederate surrender only thirty hours into the battle marked the end of the era of #masonryfortifications. The for was abandoned after 1880. It became a national monument in 1924; restoration efforts began in 1933.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of this historic #fort in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ga0120/

Visit the Fort Pulsaki website at https://www.nps.gov/fopu

#NationalParks #NationalMonument #HABSnps #HistoricPreservation #SavingPlaces #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoricFort #MilitaryHistory #MilitaryEngineers #FortDesign

SOUTHWEST CORNER AND GORGE WALL
Fort Pulaski
Cockspur Island, Savannah, Chatham County, GA
Other Title: Fort Pulaski National Monument

Jack Boucher, Photographer, August 1998

SIGNIFICANCE
Fort Pulaski was built in the second quarter of the nineteenth century by U.S. military engineers who hoped to guard against unwanted river approaches to the nearby port city of #Savannah. It was part of a chain of brick fortifications constructed up and down the east coast and represented the premier defense system of its time. Creating Fort Pulaski took one million dollars, 25 million bricks, and eighteen years of labor. When it was completed (1847), Fort Pulaski was considered invincible. The fort remained untested until the Civil War. In January 1861, the Confederate States of America seized the fort for its use and protection. Union forces targeted the fort in April 1862; yet the Confederates were unafraid of the coming bombardment. They placed their faith in the fort's solidarity. Moreover, the Union army, camped on #TybeeIsland, was over a mile away. However, the distance between the batteries and the fort was covered easily by the rifled cannon, that unbeknownst to the Confederacy, were capable of shattering the fort's 7 1/2 feet thick brick walls. By noon the following day, the walls of the fort were breached and the main powder magazine threatened. The Confederate surrender only thirty hours into the battle marked the end of the era of #masonryfortifications. The for was abandoned after 1880. It became a national monument in 1924; restoration efforts began in 1933.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of this historic #fort in the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ga0120/

Visit the Fort Pulsaki website at https://www.nps.gov/fopu

#NationalParks #NationalMonument #HABSnps #HistoricPreservation #SavingPlaces #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoricFort #MilitaryHistory #MilitaryEngineers #FortDesign

From #AbandonedBuildings to #Zoos!DID YOU KNOW you can search the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection - the nation's largest archi...
09/07/2021

From #AbandonedBuildings to #Zoos!

DID YOU KNOW you can search the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection - the nation's largest archive of historical architectural, engineering, and landscape documentation - in The Library of Congress BY SUBJECT? Yep!

Bookmark this handy-dandy link to conduct your search for FREE ACCESS to COPYRIGHT FREE measured drawings, large-format photographs and written historical reports.

Start your SEARCH BY SUBJECT at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/index/subjects/

#HABSnps #HAERnps #HALSnps #Collections #LOC #ArchitecturalHistory #HeritageDocumentation #PreservationThroughDocumentation #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoricPreservation #HistoryIsCool

From #AbandonedBuildings to #Zoos!

DID YOU KNOW you can search the HABS/HAER/HALS Collection - the nation's largest archive of historical architectural, engineering, and landscape documentation - in The Library of Congress BY SUBJECT? Yep!

Bookmark this handy-dandy link to conduct your search for FREE ACCESS to COPYRIGHT FREE measured drawings, large-format photographs and written historical reports.

Start your SEARCH BY SUBJECT at http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/index/subjects/

#HABSnps #HAERnps #HALSnps #Collections #LOC #ArchitecturalHistory #HeritageDocumentation #PreservationThroughDocumentation #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoricPreservation #HistoryIsCool

SOUTHEAST FRONTHundred OaksOak Street near U.S. Route 64Wi******er, Franklin County, TNJack E. Boucher, HABS Staff Photo...
09/07/2021

SOUTHEAST FRONT
Hundred Oaks
Oak Street near U.S. Route 64
Wi******er, Franklin County, TN

Jack E. Boucher, HABS Staff Photographer, February 1983.

SIGNIFICANCE
Hundred Oaks was begun 1889-1892. It was built for Arthur Handly Marks, a local wealthy dilettante, of local materials, by local craftsmen. Its #architecture, though based on Scottish precedents, is a combination of #Jacobean, #Romanesque and #Dutch styles. Samuel M. Patton, Chattanooga #architect, is responsible for the original design and plan, but construction ceased with Marks's death in 1892. The residence's construction continued a few years later under the direction of John Marks Handly and according to the designs of Hathcart C. Thompson and Julian G. Zwicker, Nashville architects. Further work was done by the Catholic Paulist Fathers who owned and occupied the estate from 1901 to 1955. Here they established their third mission to serve American #Protestants. In 1901 this was the site of the first Paulist Convention at which the Catholic mission to Protestants was defined. Hundred Oaks was a major site for #Catholic religious activity in the South during these years. The house stood vacant for several years afterward but has been recently restored.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of Hundred Oaks in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/tn0048/

#HABSnps #PreservationThroughDocumentation #HistoricArchitecture #Tennessee #Wi******erTN

SOUTHEAST FRONT
Hundred Oaks
Oak Street near U.S. Route 64
Wi******er, Franklin County, TN

Jack E. Boucher, HABS Staff Photographer, February 1983.

SIGNIFICANCE
Hundred Oaks was begun 1889-1892. It was built for Arthur Handly Marks, a local wealthy dilettante, of local materials, by local craftsmen. Its #architecture, though based on Scottish precedents, is a combination of #Jacobean, #Romanesque and #Dutch styles. Samuel M. Patton, Chattanooga #architect, is responsible for the original design and plan, but construction ceased with Marks's death in 1892. The residence's construction continued a few years later under the direction of John Marks Handly and according to the designs of Hathcart C. Thompson and Julian G. Zwicker, Nashville architects. Further work was done by the Catholic Paulist Fathers who owned and occupied the estate from 1901 to 1955. Here they established their third mission to serve American #Protestants. In 1901 this was the site of the first Paulist Convention at which the Catholic mission to Protestants was defined. Hundred Oaks was a major site for #Catholic religious activity in the South during these years. The house stood vacant for several years afterward but has been recently restored.

LEARN MORE
See the rest of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) documentation of Hundred Oaks in The Library of Congress at https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/tn0048/

#HABSnps #PreservationThroughDocumentation #HistoricArchitecture #Tennessee #Wi******erTN

Address

1849 C Street NW, Room 7408
Washington D.C., DC
20240

The closest metro stops are Farragut West (blue, orange, and silver lines), which is approximately 0.6 miles from our offices at the Main Interior Building (MIB), and Farragut North (red line), which is approximately 0.7 miles away.

General information

While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you don't comply, your message will be removed. -We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racist comments or submissions, nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. -We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. -We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. -You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Finally, the appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of the Interior. For official information about the U.S. National Park Service, please visit http://www.nps.gov.

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

Telephone

(202) 354-2170

Products

Measured Drawings, Written Historical Reports, and Large-format Photographs

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Our Story

Heritage Documentation Programs (HDP) is part of the National Park Service. It administers the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), the Federal Government's oldest preservation program, and its companion programs: the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) and the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS). Documentation produced through HABS/HAER/HALS constitutes the nation's largest archive of historic architectural, engineering, and landscape documentation. Records on more than 40,000 historic sites (consisting of large-format black and white photographs, measured drawings, and written historical reports) are maintained in a special collection at the Library of Congress, available to the public copyright free in both hard copy (at the Library of Congress) and via the Library's website. HDP also develops and maintains the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Architectural and Engineering Documentation.

HDP conducts a nationwide documentation program in partnership with state and local governments, private industry, professional societies, universities, preservation groups, and other Federal agencies. The program assigns highest priority to sites that are in danger of demolition or loss by neglect, and to National Park Service properties. In addition to the summer recording program, documentation enters the Collection through mitigation activities under appropriate sections of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, submissions in prize competitions, and donations.

Documentation provides a permanent record of the nation's most important historic sites and large-scale objects. The Collection is unique in the strong support it enjoys from its institutional sponsors and the public, and is distinguished in its national scope, consistent format, archival stability, and continued growth. The documentation contributes to wider recognition and appreciation of historic resources as National Historic Landmarks, provides baseline documentation for rehabilitation and restoration, and makes available well-researched materials for interpretation and illustration. Unsurprisingly, it is the most heavily used collection at the Library of Congress' Division of Prints and Photographs.

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We warmly invite you to join the launch event of OURWOLDHERITAGE Initiative on Monday, 16 November at 14.00 CET (UTC +1). We will have an hour long broadcast to highlight the key issues World Heritage is facing today, and kick-off a year long debate on how to recalibrate the implementation of the Convention to enhance protection and overcome the crisis. Stay tuned for further details! https://www.facebook.com/events/3210129445765874/
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