Washington Monument

Washington Monument Check in page for the Washington Monument. Temporarily closed for visitation.
(4903)

Operating as usual

“How’s my favorite branch doing?” - Ryan Howard ⁣⁣Well, branches. In the shadow of Wheeler Peak at Great Basin National ...
05/01/2021

“How’s my favorite branch doing?” - Ryan Howard ⁣

Well, branches. In the shadow of Wheeler Peak at Great Basin National Park in Nevada, ancient bristlecone pine trees grow on rocky glacial moraines -- creating a surreal and beautiful landscape. (People keep calling me a "Wunderkind")

Bristlecone pines are the world’s longest living tree. This strange tree, shaped by the wind, snow, and rain has survived over thousands of years, overseeing the rise and fall of great empires, growing through ice-ages and catastrophic volcanic eruptions. But their ability to survive these harsh environments and adverse growing conditions is exactly their secret to great longevity.⁣

Image: A gnarly Bristlecone Pine at sunset at Great Basin National Park. NPS/Kelly Carroll⁣

“How’s my favorite branch doing?” - Ryan Howard ⁣

Well, branches. In the shadow of Wheeler Peak at Great Basin National Park in Nevada, ancient bristlecone pine trees grow on rocky glacial moraines -- creating a surreal and beautiful landscape. (People keep calling me a "Wunderkind")

Bristlecone pines are the world’s longest living tree. This strange tree, shaped by the wind, snow, and rain has survived over thousands of years, overseeing the rise and fall of great empires, growing through ice-ages and catastrophic volcanic eruptions. But their ability to survive these harsh environments and adverse growing conditions is exactly their secret to great longevity.⁣

Image: A gnarly Bristlecone Pine at sunset at Great Basin National Park. NPS/Kelly Carroll⁣

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a rich heritage thousands of years old and have both shaped the history of th...
05/01/2021

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a rich heritage thousands of years old and have both shaped the history of the United States and had their lives dramatically influenced by moments in its history. Every May during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and throughout the year, the National Park Service and our partners share those histories and the continuing culture thriving in parks and communities today. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/asian-american-pacific-islander-heritage-month.htm

Inspired by something you've learned or found a bit of family history in a national park? Share your experiences on social media using #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth and #FindYourPark / #EncuentraTuParque.

Image: Dancers at National Park of American Samoa perpetuate Fa’asamoa by sharing the living and vibrant traditions, language, legends, oral history, and values.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a rich heritage thousands of years old and have both shaped the history of the United States and had their lives dramatically influenced by moments in its history. Every May during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month and throughout the year, the National Park Service and our partners share those histories and the continuing culture thriving in parks and communities today. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/asian-american-pacific-islander-heritage-month.htm

Inspired by something you've learned or found a bit of family history in a national park? Share your experiences on social media using #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth and #FindYourPark / #EncuentraTuParque.

Image: Dancers at National Park of American Samoa perpetuate Fa’asamoa by sharing the living and vibrant traditions, language, legends, oral history, and values.

04/30/2021

"One tree to rule them all, one tree for climbing, one tree to shade them all, and in the forest you'll find them."

The Lord of the Trees... or what is often referred to as "the giant cottonwood tree" can be found along the trails on your visit to Homestead National Historical Park. A walk along the woodland loop trail is a great way to further explore the bur oak forest that surrounds this tree.

Additionally, we invite you to stop by the orchard at the Homestead Heritage Center which has a variety of fruit trees that may have been found on homesteads throughout the region. We know from the testimony of his witnesses that Daniel Freeman set out 40 apple trees and about 400 peach trees on his homestead. When the trees are full of fruit you can visit the orchard and pick from them! (only collecting enough for you to eat in one day 😉)

#HomesteadNHP #ArborDay #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #MidwestNPS

04/30/2021

One of the most stunning and secretive plants of Cabrillo National Monument is this week’s Wildflower Wednesday’s showcase. The beautiful Sea Dahlia (_Leptosyne maritima_) is currently blooming in the park. However, this won’t last long. The Sea Dahlia is one of the early flowering plants in the park. Sea Dahlia are commonly found on ocean bluffs and prefers sandy soils. This rare plant is part of the Asteraceae (sunflower) family and is endangered due to habitat loss in Southern California.

The Sea Dahlia has a fleshy taproot that springs to life during the rainy season. Its foliage is lobed and mostly linear in shape, with peduncles (flower stems) 15-30 centimeters long that support the flower heads. Each of the Sea Dahlia’s radial headed flowers consist of inner disk flowers and peripheral ray flowers. A healthy plant can contain 12-15 flowers, with new buds emerging from the plant as older pollinated flowers create seed.

As this rainy season ends, the drought deciduous Sea Dahlia will start to drop all its foliage and disappear with the oncoming dry season. There will be no trace of this beautiful flower during the heat of the summer months.

What is your favorite flower in the sunflower family? (A.R.)

NPS/ A. Rosales

Image description 1: Several bright yellow flowers rise above green foliage with the ocean and horizon with clouds and blue sky in the background.

#WildflowerWednesday #Pollinatorpalooza #Plants #Wildlife #NativePlants #Flowers #Pollinators #NPS #CabrilloNationalMonument #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

The trail looked so flat on the map. ⁣⁣Washington’s Mount Rainier National Park offers over 260 miles of maintained trai...
04/30/2021

The trail looked so flat on the map. ⁣

Washington’s Mount Rainier National Park offers over 260 miles of maintained trails for your enjoyment. Trails lead through the peacefulness of the old-growth forest of the river valleys and the high subalpine meadows on the flanks of Mount Rainier. From these trails explore and experience the forests, lakes, and streams and view the fields of wildflowers and network of glaciers.⁣

Always be prepared for your walk or hike. Planning is an important step in being prepared and ready for your adventure. Pick the right trail for you and your group. Recognize your abilities and the abilities of your group. Pick a trail that everyone can successfully complete and enjoy safely. Check the park’s website or ask a ranger for details on the difficulty level of trails. Rangers can also provide trail recommendations. ⁣

Image: Stepped trail winds upward through a lush forest.

The trail looked so flat on the map. ⁣

Washington’s Mount Rainier National Park offers over 260 miles of maintained trails for your enjoyment. Trails lead through the peacefulness of the old-growth forest of the river valleys and the high subalpine meadows on the flanks of Mount Rainier. From these trails explore and experience the forests, lakes, and streams and view the fields of wildflowers and network of glaciers.⁣

Always be prepared for your walk or hike. Planning is an important step in being prepared and ready for your adventure. Pick the right trail for you and your group. Recognize your abilities and the abilities of your group. Pick a trail that everyone can successfully complete and enjoy safely. Check the park’s website or ask a ranger for details on the difficulty level of trails. Rangers can also provide trail recommendations. ⁣

Image: Stepped trail winds upward through a lush forest.

Timeline Photos
04/29/2021

Timeline Photos

A layer cake of cliffs forms a feast for your eyes.
The vivid colors of many of Grand Canyon's rock layers are due mainly to small amounts of various minerals, most containing iron, which impart subtle shades of red, orange, yellow, or green to the canyon walls.

#Geology #NationalPark #GrandCanyon #Arizona #EarthFocus #ImageDescription: Closeup of a Bright Angel shale ledge with crumbling layer upon layer of different mineralized colors: blue, green, yellow, pink, and red. NPS/Kristen M. Caldon.

April Is Connected Conservation Month, but throughout the year, you can continue to work together to help protect our sp...
04/29/2021

April Is Connected Conservation Month, but throughout the year, you can continue to work together to help protect our special places. Learn how you can take action to conserve our natural and cultural worlds and to learn more about topics like invasive species, National Historic Landmarks, birds, pollinators, preserving night skies, and how to #RecreateResponsibly!

Visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/connectedconservation/get-involved.htm

Image: Flowers in front of Star Dune and Crestone Peaks, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado.

#ConnectedConservation

April Is Connected Conservation Month, but throughout the year, you can continue to work together to help protect our special places. Learn how you can take action to conserve our natural and cultural worlds and to learn more about topics like invasive species, National Historic Landmarks, birds, pollinators, preserving night skies, and how to #RecreateResponsibly!

Visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/connectedconservation/get-involved.htm

Image: Flowers in front of Star Dune and Crestone Peaks, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Colorado.

#ConnectedConservation

I’m just a floofy borb.Do you have a favorite bird? Can you identify some of the common birds in your area? These beauti...
04/29/2021

I’m just a floofy borb.

Do you have a favorite bird? Can you identify some of the common birds in your area? These beautiful and fascinating animals are everywhere. Check out this Indigo bunting at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. When it isn’t flying over fields looking for insects and seeds, the indigo bunting spends a lot of time perched on telephone lines and branches (strong and sturdy ones) singing its bouncy tune. Another fun fact about this chipper bird is that it migrates at night, navigating by the stars. In the late spring and summer, the indigo bunting spreads across the eastern U.S., and will spend the winter in the Carribean and Central America.⁣

Learn more about birds you’ll find in parks at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/birds/visit.htm

Image: Fluffy Indigo bunting sits on a branch. NPS/N. Lewis⁣

I’m just a floofy borb.

Do you have a favorite bird? Can you identify some of the common birds in your area? These beautiful and fascinating animals are everywhere. Check out this Indigo bunting at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park. When it isn’t flying over fields looking for insects and seeds, the indigo bunting spends a lot of time perched on telephone lines and branches (strong and sturdy ones) singing its bouncy tune. Another fun fact about this chipper bird is that it migrates at night, navigating by the stars. In the late spring and summer, the indigo bunting spreads across the eastern U.S., and will spend the winter in the Carribean and Central America.⁣

Learn more about birds you’ll find in parks at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/birds/visit.htm

Image: Fluffy Indigo bunting sits on a branch. NPS/N. Lewis⁣

04/28/2021

For millennia, Native Americans had their own names for the islands and area places. These names were passed down through the generations in stories and everyday communication. Non-natives who came to the area had to quickly learn the Native place names in order to integrate within the community. Many of these Ojibwe names are still used throughout communities today.

Last winter, we worked on an update to our Official Park Map & Brochure, and it was important to include these names on this brochure. We are very excited about this recent update because the map now includes the 𝘖𝘫𝘪𝘣𝘸𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘸𝘪𝘯 (Ojibwe language) names for all of 𝘞𝘦𝘯𝘢𝘣𝘰𝘻𝘩𝘰 𝘰𝘮𝘪𝘯𝘪𝘴𝘢𝘯 (Apostle Islands), the 𝘔𝘢𝘴𝘩𝘬𝘪𝘪 𝘡𝘪𝘪𝘣𝘪𝘪 (Bad River) and 𝘎𝘢𝘢-𝘮𝘪𝘴𝘬𝘸𝘢𝘢𝘣𝘪𝘬𝘢𝘢𝘯𝘨 (Red Cliff) Bands, 𝘎𝘪𝘤𝘩𝘪𝘨𝘢𝘮𝘪 (Lake Superior), and 𝘡𝘢𝘢𝘨𝘢𝘸𝘢𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘬𝘰𝘯𝘨-𝘸𝘪𝘪𝘬𝘸𝘦𝘥 (Chequamegon Bay).

𝘖𝘫𝘪𝘣𝘸𝘦𝘮𝘰𝘸𝘪𝘯 is traditionally an oral language, so it is important to not just see the words, but to hear them. Hearing and speaking these words helps preserve the culture of this special place.

With that in mind, we are updating our website to include recorded audio of these place names and other words. These recordings can be found at go.nps.gov/OjibwePlaceNames. Currently, you can find audio recordings of the Place Names, the 13 Ojibwe moons, and all the Ojibwe words used in our Junior Ranger Activity Guide. We're looking forward to adding more audio in the future.

[NPS Map]

Timeline Photos
04/28/2021

Timeline Photos

Imagine a pink supermoon rising next to the red rocks of Arches National Park. This combination could be unforgettable. 🌕

As we gaze up into the sky over the next few nights, the first supermoon of the year will rise. It will be visible after sunset until around midnight.

While this April supermoon is called the Pink Supermoon, it is not genuinely pink, but rather it coincides with spring and the blooming of wildflowers. As you observe the moon, you may even notice its beautiful glow as it is closer to the earth than the average full moon.

What would you call this unique moon?

Tips for viewing:
🏜️Find an open space, such as Panorama Point in Arches National Park or your own backyard.
🔦Bring a red light to find your way in the dark.
🌕Look towards the horizon as the moon rises.

#Supermoon #PinkSupermoon #ParkAfterDark #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque

📸NPS/Jacob W. Frank

I’m not an eagle, but I play one on TV.⁣⁣Did you hear it? Majestic! Must’ve been a soaring bald eagle! Wait. You say the...
04/27/2021

I’m not an eagle, but I play one on TV.⁣

Did you hear it? Majestic! Must’ve been a soaring bald eagle! Wait. You say the loud screech associated with a bald eagle, in fact, may belong to a different bird? True story. Whether on a hike or watching a bald eagle soar across your TV screen, you're most likely hearing the call of the red-tailed hawk. Yep, the much smaller red-tailed hawk has a mightier voice than its larger cousin, the bald eagle. Our eagle friend usually goes with a series of high-pitched whistling or piping notes, while the hawk makes the familiar hoarse, screaming kee-eeeee-arr! ⁣

Learn more about birds found in parks at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/birds

Image: I do my own stunt voice. Young red tailed hawk stares at camera at Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia. NPS/Linda Williams⁣

I’m not an eagle, but I play one on TV.⁣

Did you hear it? Majestic! Must’ve been a soaring bald eagle! Wait. You say the loud screech associated with a bald eagle, in fact, may belong to a different bird? True story. Whether on a hike or watching a bald eagle soar across your TV screen, you're most likely hearing the call of the red-tailed hawk. Yep, the much smaller red-tailed hawk has a mightier voice than its larger cousin, the bald eagle. Our eagle friend usually goes with a series of high-pitched whistling or piping notes, while the hawk makes the familiar hoarse, screaming kee-eeeee-arr! ⁣

Learn more about birds found in parks at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/birds

Image: I do my own stunt voice. Young red tailed hawk stares at camera at Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia. NPS/Linda Williams⁣

04/27/2021

Happy Pink Moon!

Though April's full moon is so-called for the blooming of moss phlox (Phlox subulata), the name also invites an opportunity to appreciate the colors that often accompany a full moon's rise.

Full moons rise in the east as the sun sets in the west (they're full because they're opposite the sun), but they're not the only thing rising in the east. See that dark band of shadow just above the horizon? A rising shadow is exactly what it is: one cast by the Earth onto the atmosphere and into space (you can see a nice curve to it if you've got a wide enough view of the horizon--say at Yovimpa Point).

Just above the Earth's rising shadow the sky's color becomes reddish pink. This colorful band of light is known as the Belt of Venus or Anti-twilight Arch.

Shorter wavelengths of light (think the violet side of the rainbow) are more easily scattered by our atmosphere, whereas longer wavelengths (the red side of the rainbow) are able to make it through to be seen by us. The light nearest to the Earth's shadow is travelling through more atmosphere than the light above it, so only a reddish light is reflected back to us.

What other hues can you see as you move up toward the scattered blue light of the sky above the rising moon?

While a partly cloudy sunset can provide some dynamic light, its the absolutely clear sunsets that provide an opportunity to really appreciate this phenomenon. Sadly, it's looking pretty cloudy here tonight, but those visiting tomorrow can try their luck with the partly cloudy skies forecasted for Tuesday's full moon hike.

Read more about full moon hikes at https://www.nps.gov/brca/planyourvisit/fullmoonhikes.htm

#FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #PinkMoon
Photo NPS/Peter Densmore
(pd)

If I fits, I sits...⁣⁣Cats gonna cat. Perched on a saguaro ⁣(suh-wah-roe), this bobcat finds itself in a sticky situatio...
04/26/2021

If I fits, I sits...⁣

Cats gonna cat. Perched on a saguaro ⁣(suh-wah-roe), this bobcat finds itself in a sticky situation. Perhaps it's scanning the landscape for dinner or maybe just enjoys lookin' sharp? Actually, Bobcats have been known to climb tall trees and even cactus. They may do this to escape predators. Bobcats are adept climbers and have tough paws, which make them immune to the saguaro's prickly needles.⁣

Image: Bobcatcus? A bobcat sits in the arms of a saguaro cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.

#MondayMood

If I fits, I sits...⁣

Cats gonna cat. Perched on a saguaro ⁣(suh-wah-roe), this bobcat finds itself in a sticky situation. Perhaps it's scanning the landscape for dinner or maybe just enjoys lookin' sharp? Actually, Bobcats have been known to climb tall trees and even cactus. They may do this to escape predators. Bobcats are adept climbers and have tough paws, which make them immune to the saguaro's prickly needles.⁣

Image: Bobcatcus? A bobcat sits in the arms of a saguaro cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.

#MondayMood

Address

2 15th Street NW
Washington D.C., DC
20024

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Washington Monument posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Washington Monument:

Videos

Our Story

Open! Tickets (free) required. Get them online at recreation.gov up to 90 days in advance, or by “walk up” to ticket window at Washington Monument Lodge, just east of the obelisk, on 17th Street (opens daily at 8:30 A.M.) Queue up early. First come first served.

Nearby government services


Other Public & Government Services in Washington D.C.

Show All