President's Park (White House)

President's Park (White House) Welcome to the official page for President's Park (White House), which includes the White House Grounds, the Ellipse, and the White House Visitor Center.

Operating as usual

Ahead of the holiday season, the NPS has planted a new National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse today! Since 1973, the Nat...
10/30/2021
New National Christmas Tree planted in President’s Park 2021 - President's Park (White House) (U.S. National Park Service)

Ahead of the holiday season, the NPS has planted a new National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse today! Since 1973, the National Christmas Tree has been a living tree that can be viewed year-round here at President’s Park.

WASHINGTON — Ahead of the holiday season, the National Park Service (NPS) planted a new National Christmas Tree on the Ellipse in President’s Park today. The new tree, a 27-foot white fir (Abies Concolor) from Middleburg, Pa. was donated by Hill View Christmas Tree Farm, and will be the first wh...

"Experience National Parks Through the Lens of Youth," an exhibit by students in President's Park's Summer Photography P...
08/27/2021
National Park Service to showcase high schoolers’ photos | WTOP

"Experience National Parks Through the Lens of Youth," an exhibit by students in President's Park's Summer Photography Program, opens this Saturday at noon at the White House Visitor Center!

Starting Saturday, the work of 20 young photographers will be on display at the White House Visitor Center, as part of an exhibit titled “Experience National Parks Through the Lens of Youth.”

Happy Birthday to the National Park Service!! At 105, you're looking better than ever!!
08/25/2021

Happy Birthday to the National Park Service!! At 105, you're looking better than ever!!

Happy Birthday to the National Park Service!! At 105, you're looking better than ever!!

08/03/2021

As we celebrate the 🌳 National Park Service’s 105th birthday this month, what are some of the local programs that parks put together that we may not be aware of?

Well, in July, President's Park (White House) invited 20 talented volunteer youth in grades 9-11 to join their 📸 photography program as part of the Arts in the Parks Program to develop their photographic techniques. Throughout the program, they traveled to different national park sites in the DC area to photograph different settings, practicing what they had learned. They then submitted these at the end of the program where a panel of judges vote on the top three based on different criteria, including basic technique, composition, lighting, subject/interest, originality/interpretation, story/mood, and how well it captures the NPS mission.

⭐️ The photos will be displayed in the White House Visitor Center with the top three featured prominently. Different parks they visited included Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, Glen Echo Park (U.S. National Park Service), Great Falls Park, Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, Clara Barton National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service), and the National Mall and Memorial Parks. Stay tuned to see some of the photos they took during their program!

Learn more about President’s Park ➡️ https://www.nps.gov/whho/index.htm

📸 NPS - President’s Park Youth taking photos as part of their photography program on the National Mall and at Frederick Douglas National Historic Site

#FindYourPark #NPSYouth #Photography

The President’s Park 2021 Summer Youth Photography Program has been a huge success! Twenty talented high school students...
07/23/2021

The President’s Park 2021 Summer Youth Photography Program has been a huge success! Twenty talented high school students with a passion for photography were selected to attend the program in which they traveled to different National Parks and enhanced their photography skills!

#FindYourPark #NatlParkService #PresParkNPS #Photography

📸 by Julian Dorsey-Ruffin. Group photo by Nilda Keres.

Photos from Frederick Douglass National Historic Site's post
07/14/2021

Photos from Frederick Douglass National Historic Site's post

Summer inspires us all to go outside and explore the great outdoors. High temperatures and the risk of heat illness can ...
06/23/2021

Summer inspires us all to go outside and explore the great outdoors. High temperatures and the risk of heat illness can happen in any national park environment whether its an urban, historical, mountainous, or desert park. Stay hydrated and be prepared for the increased risk of heat-related illnesses while recreating.

💧 Plan for your water needs. Check that there are drinking water sources available at the park and along your trip route.

💧 Drink water often. Stay hydrated and drink before you feel thirsty. The amount of water you need may increase if you are exercising. Carry at least a liter of water for every member of your group when hiking, and drink water throughout the day - not just when you feel thirsty.

💧 Rest often, and in the shade, if available. Soak yourself with water. On days with extreme heat, plan extra time to allow yourself to rest and cool off frequently during your activity.

💧 Take time to acclimate to high altitudes. You body loses more fluids at high altitudes, increasing your risk of dehydration and heat-related illnesses.

💧 Remember, running from wild animals increases heart rate, sweating, and can lead to extreme feelings of thirst. Keep a safe distance from all wildlife.

💧 Learn more tips to beat the heat at https://home.nps.gov/articles/heat-illness.htm

Image: A graphic showing a large water droplet with a water bottle and ranger hat. Text includes, “Beat the heat, stay hydrated”, and “plan for your water needs, stay hydrated and drink before you feel thirsty, rest often, and in the shade, if available, and take time to acclimate to high altitudes.”

#NationalHydrationDay

Summer inspires us all to go outside and explore the great outdoors. High temperatures and the risk of heat illness can happen in any national park environment whether its an urban, historical, mountainous, or desert park. Stay hydrated and be prepared for the increased risk of heat-related illnesses while recreating.

💧 Plan for your water needs. Check that there are drinking water sources available at the park and along your trip route.

💧 Drink water often. Stay hydrated and drink before you feel thirsty. The amount of water you need may increase if you are exercising. Carry at least a liter of water for every member of your group when hiking, and drink water throughout the day - not just when you feel thirsty.

💧 Rest often, and in the shade, if available. Soak yourself with water. On days with extreme heat, plan extra time to allow yourself to rest and cool off frequently during your activity.

💧 Take time to acclimate to high altitudes. You body loses more fluids at high altitudes, increasing your risk of dehydration and heat-related illnesses.

💧 Remember, running from wild animals increases heart rate, sweating, and can lead to extreme feelings of thirst. Keep a safe distance from all wildlife.

💧 Learn more tips to beat the heat at https://home.nps.gov/articles/heat-illness.htm

Image: A graphic showing a large water droplet with a water bottle and ranger hat. Text includes, “Beat the heat, stay hydrated”, and “plan for your water needs, stay hydrated and drink before you feel thirsty, rest often, and in the shade, if available, and take time to acclimate to high altitudes.”

#NationalHydrationDay

"I'm right on top of that, Rose!" - Sue Ellen Crandell⁣⁣Hoverflies are flies that look like bees or wasps. Their disguis...
06/22/2021

"I'm right on top of that, Rose!" - Sue Ellen Crandell⁣

Hoverflies are flies that look like bees or wasps. Their disguise (and resume) is very good and casual observers often mistake them for small bees or wasps. They are also called flower flies or syrphid flies and make up the insect family Syrphidae. As their common name suggests, they are often seen hovering or nectaring at flower. Like bees, hoverflies are important pollinators. However, unlike their look-a-likes, they rarely get the recognition they deserve. While feeding on nectar and pollen, it's thought their hovering behavior might help them avoid the many predators that hide among the flowers waiting for unsuspecting prey. How can you tell the difference between a bee and a hoverfly? Bees have much smaller eyes in proportion to their heads. Hoverflies also have one set of wings, while bees have two. Bees also have longer antennae than hoverflies.⁣

Learn more about pollinators at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/pollinators/species.htm

Image: This hoverfly (Helophilus sp.) on a wild rose at Glacier National Park is doing its best to mimic a bee. NPS/Jacob W. Frank⁣

#NationalPollinatorWeek

"I'm right on top of that, Rose!" - Sue Ellen Crandell⁣

Hoverflies are flies that look like bees or wasps. Their disguise (and resume) is very good and casual observers often mistake them for small bees or wasps. They are also called flower flies or syrphid flies and make up the insect family Syrphidae. As their common name suggests, they are often seen hovering or nectaring at flower. Like bees, hoverflies are important pollinators. However, unlike their look-a-likes, they rarely get the recognition they deserve. While feeding on nectar and pollen, it's thought their hovering behavior might help them avoid the many predators that hide among the flowers waiting for unsuspecting prey. How can you tell the difference between a bee and a hoverfly? Bees have much smaller eyes in proportion to their heads. Hoverflies also have one set of wings, while bees have two. Bees also have longer antennae than hoverflies.⁣

Learn more about pollinators at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/pollinators/species.htm

Image: This hoverfly (Helophilus sp.) on a wild rose at Glacier National Park is doing its best to mimic a bee. NPS/Jacob W. Frank⁣

#NationalPollinatorWeek

Photos from Santa Fe National Historic Trail's post
06/22/2021

Photos from Santa Fe National Historic Trail's post

06/22/2021

Good morning from the Sandy Hook Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area! You can take the Seastreak Ferry from Manhattan to Sandy Hook. C’mon out and find your park.

San Juan National Historic Site and World Heritage Site preserves the history of the fort's soldiers, and offers visitor...
06/22/2021

San Juan National Historic Site and World Heritage Site preserves the history of the fort's soldiers, and offers visitors beautiful views of architecture. The park includes forts San Cristóbal, San Felipe del Morro, and San Juan de la Cruz (also known as El Canuelo), in addition to Paseo del Morro National Recreation Trail, bastions, powder houses, and three-fourths of the city wall. All these fortifications surround the old, colonial portion of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Fort San Juan de la Cruz is located at Isla de Cabras at the western end of the entrance to San Juan Bay.⁣

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/saju

Image: The historic walls include many of the original features such as the bastions and sentry boxes or “garitas.”⁣

San Juan National Historic Site and World Heritage Site preserves the history of the fort's soldiers, and offers visitors beautiful views of architecture. The park includes forts San Cristóbal, San Felipe del Morro, and San Juan de la Cruz (also known as El Canuelo), in addition to Paseo del Morro National Recreation Trail, bastions, powder houses, and three-fourths of the city wall. All these fortifications surround the old, colonial portion of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Fort San Juan de la Cruz is located at Isla de Cabras at the western end of the entrance to San Juan Bay.⁣

Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/saju

Image: The historic walls include many of the original features such as the bastions and sentry boxes or “garitas.”⁣

"Did everything just taste purple for a second?" - Philip J. Fry⁣⁣Yes. Yes it did. National Pollinator Week is a time to...
06/21/2021

"Did everything just taste purple for a second?" - Philip J. Fry⁣

Yes. Yes it did. National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them. More than 75 percent of the Earth's flowering plants depend on bees, butterflies, birds, bats, and other pollinators. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/pollinators

Image: A tiger swallowtail butterfly feasts on a purple thistle at Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.⁣

#GreatOutdoorsMonth #NationalPollinatorWeek

"Did everything just taste purple for a second?" - Philip J. Fry⁣

Yes. Yes it did. National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them. More than 75 percent of the Earth's flowering plants depend on bees, butterflies, birds, bats, and other pollinators. Learn more at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/pollinators

Image: A tiger swallowtail butterfly feasts on a purple thistle at Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.⁣

#GreatOutdoorsMonth #NationalPollinatorWeek

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY to all the fathers, stepfathers, and father figures in our lives, including President Joe Biden and S...
06/21/2021

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY to all the fathers, stepfathers, and father figures in our lives, including President Joe Biden and Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff! We hope you enjoy your special day surrounded by those you care about most!

HAPPY FATHER'S DAY to all the fathers, stepfathers, and father figures in our lives, including President Joe Biden and Second Gentleman Doug Emhoff! We hope you enjoy your special day surrounded by those you care about most!

The official start of summer kicks off in the Northern Hemisphere today (June 20), marking the longest day of the year! ...
06/20/2021

The official start of summer kicks off in the Northern Hemisphere today (June 20), marking the longest day of the year!

Summer is traditionally a very lively time in national parks with people coming out to enjoy vacations. This year, to have the best experience, it is more important than ever to plan ahead. National parks and the communities around them may still be building up their services or already be booked or at capacity.

Summer also brings high temperatures and the risk of heat illness, which can happen in any national park environment whether its an urban, historical, mountainous, or desert park. Be prepared for high temperatures and the increased risk of heat-related illnesses while recreating.

Find more summer tips at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/summer-season.htm

Image: The sun sets behind a boulder field. White clouds stretch across a blue sky at Joshua Tree National Park, California. NPS/Hannah Schwalbe

#SummerSolstice

The official start of summer kicks off in the Northern Hemisphere today (June 20), marking the longest day of the year!

Summer is traditionally a very lively time in national parks with people coming out to enjoy vacations. This year, to have the best experience, it is more important than ever to plan ahead. National parks and the communities around them may still be building up their services or already be booked or at capacity.

Summer also brings high temperatures and the risk of heat illness, which can happen in any national park environment whether its an urban, historical, mountainous, or desert park. Be prepared for high temperatures and the increased risk of heat-related illnesses while recreating.

Find more summer tips at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/npscelebrates/summer-season.htm

Image: The sun sets behind a boulder field. White clouds stretch across a blue sky at Joshua Tree National Park, California. NPS/Hannah Schwalbe

#SummerSolstice

06/20/2021

"What's up?" The last couple of days, visitors have been asking what the yellow patterns on top of the lake were caused by. Any guesses?

Here's a hint: It only lasts on the lake surface for a couple of weeks.

Need another hint? It leads perfectly into the theme of next week, which is.....

#PollinatorWeek ! It's as if the trees knew all along! What better way to lead into Pollinator Week than to pay tribute to that ubiquitous pollinator that is dusting Crater Lake right now: the wind. The male cones of conifer trees have been spreading their pollen far and wide, dusting female cones (productive), the lake and our cars (not so productive.) This photo is from our we**am, so you can watch the accumulation, movement, then sinking of the pollen patterns over the next couple of weeks. https://www.nps.gov/crla/learn/photosmultimedia#findyourpark

[Photo depicts a view of Wizard Island and Crater Lake with a sheen of yellow pollen visible on the lake surface.]

#FindYourPark

"What did the ocean say to the beach?" "Nothing, it just waved."Awww. That was swell. Do you have a nature-themed Dad jo...
06/20/2021

"What did the ocean say to the beach?" "Nothing, it just waved."

Awww. That was swell. Do you have a nature-themed Dad joke? Like this wave, it can be full groan.

Who’s ready for the beach? Cape Hatteras National Seashore, the nation’s first national seashore, was established to preserve significant segments of unspoiled barrier islands along North Carolina’s stretch of coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Spending time on the sandy beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore is a memorable experience, no matter your activity level. You can enjoy walking along the nearly 70 miles of beach, sitting around the crackle and warmth of a beach fire in the evening, flying kites in the warm summer breezes, picnicking with your favorite food, searching for shells washed ashore, sculpting sand into works of art, or just relaxing on the warm, golden sand.

Image: Looking through a wave tube off of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Photo by Connor Halpin (sharetheexperience.org)

#FathersDay #DadJokes #NationalOceanMonth

"What did the ocean say to the beach?" "Nothing, it just waved."

Awww. That was swell. Do you have a nature-themed Dad joke? Like this wave, it can be full groan.

Who’s ready for the beach? Cape Hatteras National Seashore, the nation’s first national seashore, was established to preserve significant segments of unspoiled barrier islands along North Carolina’s stretch of coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Spending time on the sandy beaches of Cape Hatteras National Seashore is a memorable experience, no matter your activity level. You can enjoy walking along the nearly 70 miles of beach, sitting around the crackle and warmth of a beach fire in the evening, flying kites in the warm summer breezes, picnicking with your favorite food, searching for shells washed ashore, sculpting sand into works of art, or just relaxing on the warm, golden sand.

Image: Looking through a wave tube off of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Photo by Connor Halpin (sharetheexperience.org)

#FathersDay #DadJokes #NationalOceanMonth

Address

1450 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington D.C., DC
20230

General information

While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. In addition to keeping it family friendly, we ask that you follow our posting guidelines here. If you don't comply, your message will be removed. -We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racist comments or submissions, nor do we allow` comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. -We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Similarly, we do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. -We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. -You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Finally, the appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of the Interior. For official information about the U.S. National Park Service, please visit http://www.nps.gov/.

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11am - 4pm
Thursday 11am - 4pm
Friday 11am - 4pm
Saturday 11am - 4pm

Telephone

(202) 208-1631

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