Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project

Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project (MAIP) is dedicated to correcting and preventing the conviction of innocent people in DC, Maryland, and Virginia.
(8)

The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project is a non-profit organization that provides free investigative and legal assistance to people who have been convicted of crimes they did not commit in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The Project was founded in 2000 and has in-house attorneys and an investigator who investigate cases and represent individuals with pro bono lawyers.

The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project is a non-profit organization that provides free investigative and legal assistance to people who have been convicted of crimes they did not commit in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The Project was founded in 2000 and has in-house attorneys and an investigator who investigate cases and represent individuals with pro bono lawyers.

Mission: Our mission is to seek the exoneration and release of persons who have been convicted of crimes that they did not commit in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

Operating as usual

A subcommittee of the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council advanced legislation Tuesday that would expand tr...
11/22/2020
FOIA advisory council subcommittee advances bill on criminal files transparency

A subcommittee of the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council advanced legislation Tuesday that would expand transparency for criminal investigative files and make them subject to the Freedom of Information Act with certain conditions.

House Bill 5090, sponsored by Del. Chris Hurst, D-Blacksburg, would allow people to request all criminal investigative files through the FOIA process. Police departments would be required to release these files unless a judge rules the release would jeopardize an ongoing investigation or cause harm, which would include jeopardizing the privacy of victims. A case would no longer be considered ongoing when it has been adjudicated or evidence would stop being collected.

(The Center Square) – A subcommittee of the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council advanced legislation Tuesday that would expand transparency for criminal investigative files and make them subject to

According to the Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform, at least 39% of local jail inmates in Maryland have a mental heal...
11/20/2020
Mental health treatment a crucial component of criminal justice reform | READER COMMENTARY

According to the Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform, at least 39% of local jail inmates in Maryland have a mental health disorder. Nine out of 10 of those individuals also struggle with a co-occurring substance abuse disorder. For many of these individuals, the statistics show that their prison stays will likely be longer than that of the average incarcerated person, and that once they leave prison they are also more likely to return to the criminal justice system.

Efforts to curb police violence must also address the need to deal more effectively with individuals who have serious mental health problems.

As the holidays approach, you can make an impact while you shop for Black Friday deals. Simply shop at smile.amazon.com/...
11/18/2020
Support Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project by shopping at AmazonSmile.

As the holidays approach, you can make an impact while you shop for Black Friday deals. Simply shop at smile.amazon.com/ch/54-1993334 and AmazonSmile will donate to Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will donate to Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project. Support us every time you shop.

Check out our latest newsletter!
11/16/2020
Where Has The Time Gone?

Check out our latest newsletter!

Latest news and updates from the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project IT'S BEEN AWHILE We know it’s been awhile since you’ve heard from us. We’ve missed you and hope that you and your families are staying h

Virginia lawmakers finalized a sprawling package of criminal justice reform bills this week as they gaveled out of a spe...
11/12/2020
Every criminal justice reform that passed in Virginia after George Floyd’s death - Virginia Mercury

Virginia lawmakers finalized a sprawling package of criminal justice reform bills this week as they gaveled out of a special legislative session that stretched nearly 12 weeks.

Prompted by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the widespread outrage that followed, the hundreds of pages of legislation they adopted reflect years of pent-up demand for change among Democrats, who hold majorities in both chambers of the General Assembly for the first time in more than two decades.

Virginia lawmakers finalized a sprawling package of criminal justice reform bills this week as they gaveled out of a special legislative session that stretched nearly 12 weeks. Prompted by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the widespread outrage that followed, the hundreds of pages of leg...

MAIP is hiring! We are looking for a part-time (20 hours per week) Operations Manager.
11/09/2020
Operations Manager

MAIP is hiring! We are looking for a part-time (20 hours per week) Operations Manager.

Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project is now hiring for the position of Operations Manager in Washington. Apply today.

A happy belated Freedom Anniversary to Troy Burner! Two years ago yesterday, Troy was released on parole after being inc...
11/06/2020

A happy belated Freedom Anniversary to Troy Burner! Two years ago yesterday, Troy was released on parole after being incarcerated nearly 25 years for a crime he did not commit. Earlier this year, Troy was exonerated of all charges.

This United States is still a long way from granting incarcerated people the right to vote, and polls show the idea is u...
11/03/2020
After Years Behind Bars, These Folks Are #FreeToVote

This United States is still a long way from granting incarcerated people the right to vote, and polls show the idea is unpopular. But the thinking on who deserves these rights is starting to change.

Earlier this year, the District of Columbia granted voting rights to people in prison, joining a handful of states that allow incarcerated people to cast ballots from behind bars.

Don't forget to vote today!

Here are their stories.

Ransom Watkins: new driver. Please join us in congratulating Ransom on his new driver's permit!
10/28/2020

Ransom Watkins: new driver. Please join us in congratulating Ransom on his new driver's permit!

“You have two things against you — you’re Black and I have a badge.” That is what a Baltimore detective said to Ransom W...
10/26/2020
Opinion: Creating Accountability When the State Takes Black Lives – Maryland Matters

“You have two things against you — you’re Black and I have a badge.” That is what a Baltimore detective said to Ransom Watkins while interrogating the 16-year-old for a murder he did not commit.

“You have two things against you — you’re Black and I have a badge.” That is what a Baltimore detective said to Ransom Watkins while interrogating the 16-year-old for a murder he did not commit. Ransom and his friends Alfred Chestnut and Andrew Stewart were visiting Harlem Park Junior High o...

A Virginia subcommittee is poring over language specifics for legislation that would make certain police records subject...
10/23/2020
FOIA subcommittee debates language in Virginia investigative records transparency bill

A Virginia subcommittee is poring over language specifics for legislation that would make certain police records subject to Freedom of Information Act requests.

House Bill 5090 would allow open access to criminal investigative files unless a judge rules the release of the files would jeopardize an ongoing investigation or cause other harm, such as privacy concerns about victims. Current state law allows police departments to hold onto these files and grants them significant discretion over what documents are released to the public.

A Virginia subcommittee is poring over language specifics for legislation that would make certain police records subject to Freedom of Information Act requests.

In the interview aired October 14, 2020, Flowers said he survived the ordeal with the unbending support of his family. H...
10/21/2020
‘Keep Your Head Up and Don’t Give Up’ — Exoneree Curtis Flowers Gives an Illuminating First Interview to the In the Dark Podcast

In the interview aired October 14, 2020, Flowers said he survived the ordeal with the unbending support of his family. He drew strength from his mother, who told him: “Keep your head up and don’t give up. We all know it’s a lie. You know it’s a lie. Everyone you know knows it’s a lie. … [D]on’t give up.”

In his first interview since his September 24, 2020 exoneration, former Mississippi death-row prisoner Curtis Flowers (pictured) spoke with In the Dark podcast host and lead reporter Madeleine Baran about his 24-year journey to freedom after having being framed, tried six times, sent to death row…

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, the special prosecutor who led the Breonna Taylor investigation, has been hard...
10/15/2020
The Breonna Taylor case proves that prosecutors have too much power

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, the special prosecutor who led the Breonna Taylor investigation, has been hard-pressed to keep a juror from speaking publicly about the grand jury proceedings. 

On October 8, an attorney for the anonymous juror argued before a judge that all recordings, transcripts, and files be released, and that the juror be allowed to “talk about their service” on the grand jury. In response, Cameron filed a motion to prevent the juror from speaking publicly while he appeals the case.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron didn’t pursue murder charges for the cops who killed Breonna Taylor. Here’s how that happened.

Imagine losing your freedom, locked up behind bars while your pleas of innocence fall on deaf ears. For three Baltimore ...
10/08/2020
Even Though They Are Free, Harlem Park Three Struggle To Adjust To Life After Prison

Imagine losing your freedom, locked up behind bars while your pleas of innocence fall on deaf ears. For three Baltimore men and many others this was a reality.

We continue looking into the lives of the Harlem Park Three Tuesday night, grown men who as teenagers were wrongfully convicted of a murder they did not commit.

After 36 years wrongly imprisoned, the Harlem Park Three are struggling to adjust to life, connect with their family and feel like they lost so much of their life.

You might remember the celebrated release of the Harlem Park Three last year. Now grown men, in 1983 at age 16, they wer...
10/06/2020
In Their Own Words: Exonerated Harlem Park Three Recall Their 1983 Murder Arrests, Say More Innocent People Are 'Wasting Away' In Prison

You might remember the celebrated release of the Harlem Park Three last year. Now grown men, in 1983 at age 16, they were wrongfully convicted of murder.

Their release was a victory thanks to the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s office and the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project.

In an exclusive interview, the Harlem Park Three share what it was like to be wrongfully convicted and the freed more than 30 years later.

This #WrongfulConvictionDay, sign the pledge to demand police accountability.As we collectively demand change, the Innoc...
10/02/2020
Justice and Accountability

This #WrongfulConvictionDay, sign the pledge to demand police accountability.

As we collectively demand change, the Innocence community also reflects on how the dehumanization of Black and brown people not only translates into police violence, but also into wrongful convictions.

Massive protests across the world ignited this past year with clarion calls for police accountability in the wake of George Floyd's death. As we collectively demand change, the Innocence community also reflects on how the dehumanization of Black and brown people not only translates into police viole...

#WrongfulConvictionDay is this Friday, October 2. It's time we do something about how race plays a part in wrongful conv...
09/30/2020

#WrongfulConvictionDay is this Friday, October 2. It's time we do something about how race plays a part in wrongful convictions.

Maryland legislators and law enforcement officials debated Thursday whether lawmakers should repeal or repair the state’...
09/25/2020
Repair vs. Repeal: Maryland legislators debate future of Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights

Maryland legislators and law enforcement officials debated Thursday whether lawmakers should repeal or repair the state’s Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights, the controversial decades-old document that outlines the due process procedure for investigating and disciplining police misconduct.

The Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee has debated 13 other police reform bills over the past two days, leaving two for the final day of hearings: One would make a number of changes to the Law Enforcement Officers' Bill of Rights and the other would repeal it entirely.

Lawmakers and law enforcement officials butted heads over whether to end sweeping legal protections that some say protect wayward and even criminal police officers from being swiftly disciplined.

Congrats to Charles Jason Lively on his exoneration, and to the West Virginia Innocence Project and MAIP Board member An...
09/23/2020
Lively a free man after 2006 murder conviction overturned in "Doc" Whitley case

Congrats to Charles Jason Lively on his exoneration, and to the West Virginia Innocence Project and MAIP Board member Andrew George on helping right this 15 year wrong!

PRINCETON – After serving about 15 years in prison, a McDowell County man walked into a Mercer County courtroom and emerged from it as a free man after his 2006

As Maryland lawmakers consider policing reforms, local prosecutors are pushing to maintain their authority to prosecute ...
09/19/2020
Maryland prosecutors say they’re best equipped to prosecute police misconduct

As Maryland lawmakers consider policing reforms, local prosecutors are pushing to maintain their authority to prosecute cases of police misconduct.

Elected state’s attorneys told a group of lawmakers Thursday that they are better suited to take problem officers to court — not the attorney general, the state prosecutor or another entity.

As Maryland lawmakers consider policing reforms, local prosecutors are pushing to maintain their authority to prosecute cases of police misconduct.

The Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights (LEOBR) is a state law that controls the disciplinary process of police off...
09/18/2020
Opinion | One step Maryland can take to improve policing

The Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights (LEOBR) is a state law that controls the disciplinary process of police officers. The LEOBR gives police officers special rights that ordinary residents and state employees do not get, and it prevents communities from investigating misconduct that could lead to discipline. The LEOBR thwarts transparency and accountability.

These special rights range from expungement of disciplinary records to limits on what discipline can be imposed for certain infractions. This law started in Maryland in 1972. Since then, it has spread to other states. Maryland’s LEOBR is considered one of the most extreme.

The police are policing themselves and letting themselves off the hook. It’s time to end that.

But despite the boom in implicit bias training, there has been little real-life research into whether it actually change...
09/17/2020
NYPD Study: Implicit Bias Training Changes Minds, Not Necessarily Behavior

But despite the boom in implicit bias training, there has been little real-life research into whether it actually changes what police officers do on the job.

"It's like I'm offering you a pill to fix some disease, and I haven't tested to see whether it actually works," says Joshua Correll, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he studies racial bias. "Expecting that we can take people in and train them to reduce their implicit bias — I don't think it's been supported by the literature."

The NYPD has released the biggest study to date of the effectiveness of implicit bias training. The results suggest the popular training can change attitudes but not necessarily how policing is done.

But Bradford said that he believes opposition from police unions, who argued the bill was biased, proved to be too power...
09/16/2020
California failed to pass a major police reform bill. Here's what experts say that could mean for the rest of the nation

But Bradford said that he believes opposition from police unions, who argued the bill was biased, proved to be too powerful to overcome and was the reason his bill didn't come to a vote.

"The problem was the union, and we all know the police have major sway, not only here in California but across the country," Bradford told CNN. "And it forces people many times to, you know, move away from what they truly believe in under intense pressure."

Last week, California State Sen. Steven Bradford said he was confident that "the votes were there" for his proposed bill.

After 37 years behind bars, a Florida man was formally cleared Monday of a 1983 rape and murder that DNA evidence proved...
09/15/2020
Robert DuBoise exonerated: DNA evidence clears Tampa man of rape, murder after 37 years

After 37 years behind bars, a Florida man was formally cleared Monday of a 1983 rape and murder that DNA evidence proved he did not commit after a long-ago trial that relied on a sketchy jailhouse informant and faulty bite mark analysis.

Robert DuBoise was formally cleared Monday of the 1983 rape and murder of Barbara Grams in Tampa. DNA evidence cleared him 37 years after a trial that relied on a sketchy jailhouse informant and faulty bite mark analysis. Prosecutors and the Innocence Project worked together to get the exoneration.

In one exchange, Justice Laura Denvir Stith asked Assistant Attorney General Frank Jung, “Are you suggesting … even if w...
09/14/2020
Missouri Attorney General’s Office Pushes To Keep Innocent People In Prison

In one exchange, Justice Laura Denvir Stith asked Assistant Attorney General Frank Jung, “Are you suggesting … even if we find that Mr. Amrine is actually innocent, he should be executed?”

“That is correct, your honor,” Jung said.

Its decades-long commitment to upholding convictions—even those marred by police or prosecutorial misconduct—has left Missourians languishing in prison for years.

On Aug. 15, the date that marked the 10-year anniversary of Smile Generation Serve Day, Dr. Michael Perpich, DDS, and hi...
09/11/2020
Richfield Dentistry provides services for prison exoneree

On Aug. 15, the date that marked the 10-year anniversary of Smile Generation Serve Day, Dr. Michael Perpich, DDS, and his team at Richfield Dentistry provided donated dentistry to Sherman Townsend, an innocent man who was wrongly incarcerated for 10 years.

On Aug. 15, the date that marked the 10-year anniversary of Smile Generation Serve Day, Dr. Michael Perpich, DDS, and his team at Richfield Dentistry provided donated dentistry to Sherman

State legislators, local officials, civil rights advocates and law enforcement personnel have grappled for decades with ...
09/10/2020
Police 'Pretext' Traffic Stops Need to End, Some Lawmakers Say

State legislators, local officials, civil rights advocates and law enforcement personnel have grappled for decades with complaints that traffic stops unfairly target minority motorists. The George Floyd killing in May and demonstrations added pressure for change, and states and localities now are exploring new ways to reduce or eliminate pretextual or pretext stops.

In a pretext stop, an officer pulls over a motorist for a minor traffic or equipment violation and then uses the stop to investigate a more serious crime.

Police stop and search Black motorists more often.

Bite mark analysis has long been considered junk science. But for a far longer period, it was considered good science --...
09/09/2020
Prosecutor Who Used Bite Mark Analysis Even The Analyst Called 'Junk Science' Can Be Sued For Wrongful Jailing Of Innocent Woman

Bite mark analysis has long been considered junk science. But for a far longer period, it was considered good science -- a tool to be used to solve crimes and lock up perps. This case, handled by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, contains an anomaly: the bite mark expert who helped wrongly convict a woman of murder -- taking away eleven years of her life -- actually stated on record that bite mark analysis is junk science.

A lot of stuff that looks like science but hasn't actually been subjected to the rigors of the scientific process has been used by the government to wrongly deprive people of their freedom. As time moves forward, more and more of the forensic...

Address

Washington D.C., DC
20052

General information

The Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project (MAIP) is dedicated to correcting and preventing the conviction of innocent people in DC, Maryland, and Virginia.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project:

Videos

Nearby government services