Hill Rag The Hill Rag is the monthly community newspaper of record for Ward 6. It is published daily online at www.hillrag.com and monthly in print. Find us: Twitter = @HillRagDC Insta + Facebook + Flipboard = @HillRag
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Operating as usual

Feel like moving your feet to some great brass? Get a dose of that true metal 🎺🎷 with the Barclay Brass today at 2 p.m. ...
11/08/2020

Feel like moving your feet to some great brass? Get a dose of that true metal 🎺🎷 with the Barclay Brass today at 2 p.m. at 212 E Capitol for an outdoor, socially-distanced concert of classical music and Oktoberfest music! 🍺

The Barclay Brass presents a wide variety of classical music in a new style for audiences of all ages. Hosted by Paul Leavitt and Lutheran Church of the Reformation, they will also be performing the music of Gustav Holst, Eric Whitacre, Ralph Vaughan Williams and John Williams.

Sunday, November 8, 2020 2:00pm
Lutheran Church of the Reformation
212 East Capitol St.

11/08/2020

The Associated Press declared Joe Biden had won the presidency at 11:25 am Saturday.

Many District residents responded by streaming onto the streets in celebration.

Megan Ganning said she didn’t want to miss the celebration after all of her time and dedication to seeing the Biden-Harris ticket elected on Tuesday.

Gabbing was a Pennsylvania “Biden for President” volunteer.

“I gave my all,” Ganning said. “I put in every hour outside of my work so it means the world to see Pennsylvania go blue and get us to that 270.”
#Election202 #JoeBiden #KamalaHarris #PresidentJoe #VPHarris

Do you have access to a safe and reliable public transportation system? District Department of Transportation is committ...
11/05/2020

Do you have access to a safe and reliable public transportation system? District Department of Transportation is committed to ensuring all voices are heard! Please take the survey TODAY to share your vision of DC transportation at wemovedc.org.

Get out and #votedc 🗳 @vote4dc poll workers said that as of 10:44 a.m, 175 people had cast their votes in-person at the ...
11/03/2020

Get out and #votedc 🗳 @vote4dc poll workers said that as of 10:44 a.m, 175 people had cast their votes in-person at the Eastern Market (225 Seventh St. SE) polling place, most walking right in to vote. Reports indicated little to no wait times at polling places throughout the District.

Voters may vote until 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3 at any one of the DC polls. If you are not yet registered, you can do so the at the polling place the same day that you vote. You can drop off mail-in ballots at ballot boxes until 8 p.m. Ballots mailed via USPS boxes must be postmarked Nov. 3 and received by Nov. 13.

DCBOE has until Nov. 24 to certify results.

For more see story: https://www.hillrag.com/2020/11/03/little-or-no-wait-at-polling-places/: #dcision2020 #election2029 #vote

It's the season of giving, and of Thanksgiving. As the leaves fall and the weather turns colder, Hill residents express ...
11/02/2020

It's the season of giving, and of Thanksgiving. As the leaves fall and the weather turns colder, Hill residents express gratitude for the good things and find ways to share them with others.

Read about the organizations that are helping our neighbors through the pandemic and learn how you can help those community groups stay strong during this time of need.

And as usual, you'll find stories about all of the people, businesses and events around our community inside your November Hill Rag, on stands now!

on the cover:
ROBERT HENRI
Indian Girl in White Blanket, 1917
Not on View
oil on canvas
overall: 81.28 × 66.04 cm (32 × 26 in.)
Corcoran Collection
(Museum Purchase, Gallery Fund)
www.nga.org @National Gallery of Art

The Holiday Season is right around the corner. We are working up something special to connect our readers with the local...
11/01/2020

The Holiday Season is right around the corner. We are working up something special to connect our readers with the local business community. Now more than ever before they need our support! Restaurants, retailers, salons, shops are all a part of the fabric of this neighborhood. They are a huge part of what makes Capitol Hill such a unique place to call home, so let's show them our appreciation and support local this year! Details coming soon, stay-tuned!

The Importance of Giving 🙏 and Giving Thanks: 🦃🦃🦃 It's the season of giving, and of Thanksgiving. 🍂🍂🍂 As the leaves fall...
10/31/2020

The Importance of Giving 🙏 and Giving Thanks: 🦃🦃🦃 It's the season of giving, and of Thanksgiving. 🍂🍂🍂 As the leaves fall and the weather turns colder, Hill residents express gratitude for the good things and find ways to share them with others.

🦃 Your November Hill Rag is on newsstands Saturday, Oct. 31 - https://mailchi.mp/hillrag/2020-giving-and-giving-thanks

This is an important election, and City Dogs  wants to make sure that everyone can go vote! "If we can help make voting ...
10/29/2020

This is an important election, and City Dogs wants to make sure that everyone can go vote! "If we can help make voting even slightly easier for people by offering them free pet care that day, it’s the least we can do. Our democracy and our small business community depend on actively engaged citizens,” said owner/operator, Jesse Heier.

Besides supporting Election Day activities,City Dogs is proud to support elementary and secondary schools throughout the DC area, donating daycare and grooming services to dozens of school fundraising auctions. City Dogs is also a major supporter of City Dogs Rescue & City Kitties donating nearly $100K in daycare and boarding each year.

Address

224 7th St SE
Washington D.C., DC
20003

Eastern Market Metro, DC Circulator, Metro Bus routes 30S, 36

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(202) 543-8300

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The DC Public Service Commission needs your help! In 200 words, how would you build a more clean and reliable energy grid? Tomorrow October 28th is the last day to share your ideas.
DISCOVER ME..WITHOUT YOU -- TEEN AUTHORS TALK FATHER ABSENCE: A READING Nov 14, 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM online event https://www.estherproductionsinc.com/events-1/teen-authors-talk-father-absence-a-reading Contributors to the essay collection Discovering Me...Without You: Teen Girls Talk About Father Absence will read their work from the book, which was edited by Jonetta Rose Barras and published by Esther's Books, a division of Esther Productions Inc. Ana Acevedo who wrote the Preface will also discuss the importance of the collection to understanding the impact of father absence. REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. #mothers #parents #students #teens #girls #dmv #online
Esther Productions, Inc. is a Washington, DC-based national nonprofit organization. Founded in 2004, it is dedicated to inspiring and empowering girls and women. It is supported through generous contributions from Kerry S. Pearson LLC, Emmanuel Bailey, Veterans Services Corp, Pepco, an Exelon Corporation, Fort Myer Construction Corporation Charitable Foundation and Esther’s Friends. Special Thanks: Afrika Abney, Arts and Marketing Consultant Esther Productions,Inc presents DISCOVERING ME…WITHOUT YOU Second Annual Personal Essay Contest designed for teens 14 - 17. Can you please share the below flyer with members of your community? Thanks Info: https://www.estherproductionsinc.com/contest #contest #teens #students #dmv #writers
Straight Out of “The 400th” By John Burl Smith I dedicated this post “Straight Out of ‘The 400th’” to my wife Dot, and other black women, who were and are continually on the frontline, as unsung heroines of our love story, which is as older as time itself. Recently there has been lots of buzz regarding Mrs. Michelle Obama’s recent statement, “I’m experiencing “low-grade depression.” Then she followed that with, “The idea that what this country is going through shouldn’t have any effect on us-that we all should just feel OK all the time-that just doesn't feel real to me. So I hope you all are allowing yourselves to feel whatever it is you’re feeling.” It is called empathy. For me her response is consistent with the nurturant role enslaved African women have always filled from slave pens until today. The powerful thing to me is that she felt that urge and openly expressed that matriarchal tendency to relate and comfort the community. While struggling to learn how best to express my thoughts in writing, when telling a story, Dot always admonished, “It has to be a love story!” So this is an “ode to black women and a love story in her honor.” Black women began expressing this concept most profoundly, during the story I learned and tell in my narrative “The 400th” From Slavery to Hip Hop. Believe it or not, I did not set out to structure “The 400th” as I did, but in telling of it, black women and their role, very subtly at first, but conditions kept dictated their survival strategy. The circumstances enslaved Africans endured forced black women to step into the void, whenever one existed. The following passages exemplify black women’s role “Straight out of “The 400th”. First and foremost, in terms of survival for enslaved Africans, black women seemed to have decided back in slavery to throw babies at the problem, until black men came up with a better strategy. Their decision to keep bearing children, in the face of total uncertainty, pain and loss, as well as degradation and exploitation, while beginning forced to nurse masters’ children, at the expense of her child; Black they took on the burden of caring for others. They were the foundation of the next crucial decisions for former enslaved Africans after emancipation, which was to make families and build communities; black women became the center of community survival. Black women were the ones most likely to be able to read and write, so that put them in control of the family’s business. Those families that followed this strategy prospered, but those that did not, didn’t fare as well. This result is reflected by the fact that black women with children survived without men, but men without families, mostly did poorly. Some family structures former slaves developed defy textbook descriptions. Families joined together; sometimes two or three women shared one man. Some arrangements were like confederations, formed based on mutual survival needs and agreements. Just the same, whatever structure former slaves came up with, proved to be resilient enough that small groups of families became communities, aiding contrabands survival. Their decision to build communities allowed what they learned, as individuals surviving in slave pens, to become group knowledge, underpinning their common experiences, made all their other experiences part of their communal strategies. Deciding to make families and build communities, rather than dispersing among others or existing as individuals, I believe, was enslaved Africans saving grace. Although keeping the family together was their primary responsibility, black women lead all kinds of civic/social movements and activities. Their most powerful weapon was “Colored Women Clubs, which united them in the efforts to find and care for orphans. Slavery and Civil War produced millions of children who had no idea of who or the whereabouts of their parents. While simultaneously, men formed groups among themselves—ministers, lodges, and fraternal organizations—which championed and established traditions of self-help and communal support, however, women’s groups were far more effective. Identical to white men, but for different reasons, black men were very chauvinistic about leadership. Most of these groups excluded women, and those that admitted women, relegated them to second class status, at best secretaries. Today, I felt compelled to offer this ode to black women to honor their determination, strength, intelligence, resolve and refusal to yield, as Maya Angelou penned so eloquently, “Still I Rise.” I refuse to attend any “pity party” where black women are looked upon as deficient in any respect or there are questions about black women regarding anything, except being overly generous to white women, who know the truth of their prowess, because they stand on black women’s shoulders. But to get their big chance, white women align with white men to get their slice of white privilege. This ode to black women is an appeal for them to stand strong in their tradition, you have nothing which to apologize. You have earned your bona fides, competing against white privilege, so never take a step back against yourself. When you do, you will be conceding ground you have fought tremendous battles to gain. Lives were lost by black women like you to preserve gains for the next generation. Then again because you are so magnanimous, today you stand before the world based on everyone—white men, black men and white women—readily moved up over your backs to stand on your shoulders, denying you your rightful place because you are black women. Today you have earned your rightful place at the highest levels of leadership. But, I have a final question, “If not now, what was it all for?” You, black woman, asked for this, and deservedly so it is before each of you. Each time you stepped, you passed a black man, who was comfortable, hanging out with the white boys in the backroom. On such nights, you were up late, burning the midnight oil, so you could be so incredibly stunning the next morning. “If not now, what was the struggle for?” You would have never made it to where you are if being a pretty party girl was what you dreamed of and pined. Feeding your fire, after being born in darkness without real hope, you reached for that which burned brightest, as your guide toward the light that shines upon you today. Your brilliance is yours by right, not anyone’s stolen joy; you deserve everything that is before. So reach out and possess it, as your prize, for all your battles won. The best needs to show young eyes what a powerful black woman looks like and behave like, by being the example you never had. What will young eyes see if you do not provide such images? “If not this time then when?”
Before you pulled down your editorial calling upon the neighborhood to make white supremacists feel less threatened you asked a couple of questions, which should, in fact, be answered. "Will we demonize the man and harass him online, in a sense, simply affirming such behavior? Or, while maintaining that any harassment is unacceptable, will we reach out to this neighbor, defuse his discomfort and invite him to our table? The answer: 1) He threatened people claiming that he had a gang targetting them with weapons. He committed a crime. He should be arrested. Think of what would have happened if one of the BLM activists had done the same to him,specifically mentioning a gang. 2) Dr. Thomas has shown himself unfit for civilized company. We should refuse to shake his hand, to turn our back on him, refrain from taking our pets to his veteranary practice and do everything we can to inform him that he does not belong in civilized society. This is neither harassment, nor "inviting him to our table." It is the social mores of civilized people. We need to maximize his discomfort at how far from civilized norms he has strayed. If he incapable of self-reflection and remorse, he should be afraid to behave that way in public to preserve what is left of his reputation. He need not be afraid of having his windpipe crushed by a law enforcement officer. If he and his ilk are afraid that they will be unwelcome, then bring on more white fear. BTW. Oliver Wendell Holmes said, "My right to swing my fist ends where your nose begins." The depth of your misunderstanding is remarkable.
Hello Hill Rag Readers! Skills on the Hill Pediatric Therapy is running Summer Virtual Activity Groups for ALL KIDDOS. They are week-long groups that run for 1 hour a day. Cooking, Legos, art, messy concoctions, dance, bootcamp, mouth detectives, get set for kindergarten, printing, messy concoction, origami, jewelry making - definitely something for everyone. Check out the link below for more info. $125 for the week and siblings are discounted!