CULCON (U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange)

CULCON (U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange) The U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange (CULCON) is a binational advisory panel that serves to elevate and strengthen the vital cultural and educational foundations of the U.S.-Japan relationship. @USCULCONPanel

English: CULCON (US-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange), a binational advisory panel to both governments, serves to focus official and public attention in both the United States and Japan on the vital cultural and educational underpinnings of the binational relationship. 日本語: 日米文化教育交流会議(The United States - Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange : 通称 カルコン CULCON)は日米両国間の学識者を一堂に集めて両国間の文化・教育交流に関する諸問題を討議し、文化・教育分野での交流の増進と相互理解の向上について勧告を行うことを目的とする。

Mission: The US-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange (CULCON) is a binational advisory panel that serves to elevate and strengthen the vital cultural and educational foundations of the US-Japan relationship, and to strengthen connections between US and Japan leadership in those fields. It works to ensure that the best of new ideas for cultural, educational and intellectual activity and exchange are implemented as operational programs.

Operating as usual

05/04/2020

U.S. CULCON and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission Appoint New Members
Dr. Sheila Smith Appointed as Chair

Washington, D.C. May 1, 2020: The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission (JUSFC) and the U.S. CULCON Panel are pleased to announce the appointment of new Chair, Dr. Sheila A. Smith. CULCON and JUSFC have also appointed Dr. Samuel Morse, Professor, Amherst College, and Dr. William Tsutsui, who most recently served as President, Hendrix College, to serve as commissioners and panelists.
Their terms are effective May 1, 2020.
Dr. Smith is Senior Fellow for Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and an adjunct professor in the Asian Studies department of Georgetown University, where she serves on the board of its Journal of Asian Affairs. Since 2013, Dr. Smith has served as Vice Chair of CULCON and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. She led CULCON’s Next Generation Task Force, spearheaded new platforms to build a pipeline of next generation leaders, and advanced Japan Studies and people-to-people exchange.
“Japanese and Americans are working closer than ever to tackle the complexities of the 21st century. Exchanges between students, entrepreneurs, artists, community leaders, local governments and legislators all sustain this vibrant, evolving relationship. While imperative that Japan Studies continues to thrive in the United States, our shared goals are also far-reaching. Our scientists, educators and business leaders continue to collaborate on projects such as getting to Mars, developing the next generation of technology, and curing the world's infectious diseases. Ensuring that U.S. and Japanese citizens have the opportunity to learn from each other and to solve problems together is the invaluable mission of CULCON and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. I look forward to working with fellow panelists and commissioners to help the people of Japan and the United States come together to imagine and build their shared future,” Dr. Smith remarked on her appointment.
Both, JUSFC and CULCON extend their deep appreciation to Mr. Harry Hill, outgoing Chair, for his dedicated service. Mr. Hill said, “It has been an honor and privilege to lead CULCON and JUSFC. As the world shifts, the importance of identifying and fostering the next generation who care about the partnership of our two nations is once again of utmost importance. I offer my sincere gratitude to the current, past and new commissioners, and CULCON panelists who pursue this mandate with passion.” Increasing student mobility between Japan and the United States has been a priority for CULCON. As a result of its work, new opportunities are available for U.S. and Japanese students to study in each other’s country. As a grantmaking agency, JUSFC has been providing critical financial support to academic and non-profit institutions bringing visibility to the important U.S.-Japan relationship and implementing innovative programs that strengthen the bilateral partnership.”
CULCON, a binational advisory committee, meets biannually in alternating years between Japan and the United States. The next CULCON plenary session will take place in Japan in May 2021. The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is a federal grantmaking agency. Annually, the agency awards institutional grants to support Japan Studies, public policy programs and educational and cultural exchange.

“Dr. Smith’s vast experience in public policy, education and people-to-people exchange will be invaluable to the mission-focused work of CULCON and JUSFC. I look forward to working with her to lead CULCON and JUSFC through these unprecedented times,” said Paige Cottingham-Streater, Secretary-General, CULCON and Executive Director of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission.
About the Commissioners/Panelists
Sheila Smith
Dr. Sheila Smith is an expert on Japanese politics and foreign policy, she is the author of Japan Rearmed: The Politics of Military Power, Intimate Rivals: Japanese Domestic Politics and a Rising China and Japan’s New Politics and the U.S.-Japan Alliance. She is a frequent contributor to major media outlets in the United States and Asia. Her distinguished career in U.S.-Japan relations also includes directing a multinational research team in a cross-national study of the domestic politics of the U.S. military presence in Japan, South Korea, and the Philippines at the East-West Center; researching Japan’s foreign policy towards China, as an Abe Fellow; and serving as a visiting researcher at the Japan Institute of International Affairs and the Research Institute for Peace and Security, the University of Tokyo, and the University of the Ryukyus. Dr. Smith earned her MA and Ph.D. from the political science department at Columbia University.

Samuel Morse
Samuel Morse is Howard and Martha Mitchel Professor of the History of Art and Asian Languages and Civilizations at Amherst College. Dr. Morse is a specialist in Japanese Buddhist art, and serves as Consulting Curator for Japanese Art at the Smith College Museum of Art, where he has curated exhibitions on the arts of the Japanese tea ceremony and on contemporary Japanese art. In addition he has organized exhibitions on Kitagawa Utamaro for the Mead Art Museum (2006), on the art of Allen Say the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art (2007) and on Japanese Buddhist art and ritual for the Katonah Museum of Art and Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1996-1997). For six years, he was chair of the Board of Directors for the Clark Center for Japanese Art in Hanford, California. He has been a visiting researcher at the Tokyo National Research Institute of Culture Properties and a visiting professor Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University.

William Tsutsui
William (Bill) Tsutsui is former president and professor of history at Hendrix College. He previously served as dean of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences at Southern Methodist University from 2010 to 2014. Prior to joining SMU, Dr. Tsutsui spent 17 years at the University of Kansas, where he served as Acting Director of KU’s Center for East Asian Studies, Chair of the Department of History, founding Executive Director of the Confucius Institute at the University of Kansas, and Associate Dean for International Studies in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. An award-winning classroom teacher, Dr. Tsutsui is the author or editor of eight books, as well as numerous articles on modern Japanese history. He has received Fulbright, ACLS, and Marshall Fellowships, and was awarded the John Whitney Hall Prize of the Association for Asian Studies in 2000 and the William Rockhill Nelson Prize for Non-Fiction in 2005. He holds degrees from Harvard, Oxford, and Princeton universities.

Our three informative and insightful panelists today at a discussion on alumni engagement:  Nini Forino, Director @Inter...
03/04/2020

Our three informative and insightful panelists today at a discussion on alumni engagement: Nini Forino, Director @InternationalExchangeAlumni, U.S. Department of State; Bahia Simons-Lane, Executive Director, US JETAA; Anne Baker, Vice President, National Peace Corps Association. Convened at IIE

CULCON convened a panel discussion on opportunities and challenges of alumni engagement on March 4, 2020 at IIE offices ...
03/04/2020

CULCON convened a panel discussion on opportunities and challenges of alumni engagement on March 4, 2020 at IIE offices in Washington, DC. Informative presentations by Nini Forino, Director,International Exchange Alumni, U.S. Department of State; Bahia Simons-Lane, Executive Director, US JETAA; Anne Baker, Vice President, National Peace Corps Association. A great representation of the U.S.-Japan community came out to learn about finding, engaging and offering value to their program alumni.

10/21/2019
10/18/2019

CULCON, The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and the U.S.-Japan Bridging Foundation were jointly honored with the Cultural Vistas Global Partnership Award on October 17, 2019 at the Cultural Vistas Gala in New York City.

Established in 2018, the Cultural Vistas Awards Gala recognizes individuals and institutions for their influence and notable contributions toward the advancement of global skills, leadership development, and cross-cultural understanding. This signature event brings together leaders from across the business, education, government, and diplomatic communities for an evening celebrating the diversity of people, ideas, knowledge, and skills shared through international exchange.

The three organizations greatly value their partnership with Cultural Vistas, through, for example, their collaboration on the TeamUp campaign.

Pamela Fields, Deputy Secretary-General, U.S. CULCON Panel, accepted the award on behalf of the three organizations. photos forthcoming! #CVGala Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission US-Japan Bridging Foundation TeamUp Cultural Vistas

Wonderful opportunity!JUSFC Webinar Series: Resilient Rural Communities in the United States and Japan Sept.12The Japan-...
09/09/2019
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: JUSFC Webinar Series: Resilient Rural Communities in the United States and Japan Sept.12. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

Wonderful opportunity!

JUSFC Webinar Series: Resilient Rural Communities in the United States and Japan Sept.12
The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission invites you to attend an online discussion on Resilient Rural Communities in the United States and Japan.

September 12, 2019
7:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. EDT

September 13, 2019
8:15 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Japan Time

Register in advance for this webinar: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_FChiWD4eQGGeZh97FU2GGQ


Featuring experts,
Maki Hijikata, Chief Liaison with the Mayor’s Office, Project Execution, Environment, Gender Issues, Toyama City, Japan
David Leckey, Executive Director, Orton Family Foundation
Taylor Stuckert, AICP, Executive Director, Clinton County Regional Planning Commission & Co-Founder, Energize Clinton County

Moderated by Dr. Sheila Smith, Vice Chair, JUSFC; Senior Fellow Japan Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Rural authorities everywhere are enacting pioneering policies and working to improve their citizens’ lives, especially in the United States and in Japan. The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission has launched a series of web-based discussions to engage U.S. and Japanese policy makers, public servants and other relevant experts around the topic of rural resilience. Our goal is to sustain a conversation amongst a network of globally active change makers who share their successes and hurdles as they address the complex pressures on rural communities.

On September 12/13, Dr. Sheila Smith, the Commission’s Vice Chair, and Senior Fellow in Japan Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations will moderate a discussion with experts from the United States and Japan, who will share approaches to considering what rural resilience means for their country. Discussants will talk about current initiatives that might offer ideas and stimulate thought between U.S. and Japanese rural innovators, while exploring the synergies and differences between rural policy in the U.S. and Japanese context.

The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission invites you to attend an online discussion on Resilient Rural Communities in the United States and Japan. Featuring experts, Maki Hijikata, Chief Liaison with the Mayor’s Office, Project Execution, Environment, Gender Issues, Toyama City, Japan David Leckey, Ex...

Kizuna Across Cultures (KAC)
07/29/2019

Kizuna Across Cultures (KAC)

Students wrapped up day 2 in Tokyo with a career panel focused on US-Japan Relations. We were honored to have 4 outstanding speakers on the panel (in alphabetical order): Ms. Ashely Murphey, Global Business Support & Promotion, Sojitz Corporation; Mr. Ken Kuribayashi, Executive Officer, Global Business Support & Promotion, 双日株式会社(Sojitz Corporation); Ms. Misako Ito, Secretary-General of Japan CULCON Board of Directors at the I-House of Japan; and Ms. Risa Kamio, Setagaya City Council Member and Executive Director of Japan Global Education. Not only did the students get to hear about each person's careers as it relates to US-Japan, they also gained a great deal of advice that they can put to use in Washington, DC! Also, a big thanks to Noritaka Takezawa for hosting the group at Ryozan Park!

東京研修の最後のイベントは、「日米関係と私」というテーマでパネルディスカッションを開催しました。スピーカーとしてお越しいただいたのは、Ashley Murphey氏(双日、海外業務担当)、栗林顕氏(双日、海外業務担当、執行役員)、伊藤実佐子氏( 日米文化教育交流会議 日本側事務局長)、神尾りさ氏(世田谷区議会議員)(五十音順)の4名の方々です。それぞれのキャリアと日米関係との関わりについてお話を伺いました!ワシントンDCに旅立つ前夜に頂いた数々のアドバイス、日本人の生徒はワシントンでしっかり活かします。ホストして下さったRyozan Parkの竹沢さん、ありがとうございました!#GlobalClassmatesSummit

https://kacultures.org/english/gc-summit

CULCON-inspired TeamUp collaboration with Sister Cities International #SCIAnnual
07/22/2019

CULCON-inspired TeamUp collaboration with Sister Cities International #SCIAnnual

Arts Japan 2020
06/10/2019

Arts Japan 2020

A newly opened exhibit at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco explores the circular relationship between intricate pictorial tattoos and woodblock prints of tattooed heroes during Japan’s Edo era. The first written records of irezumi, the art of Japanese tattoo (which translates literally to “inserting ink”) are more than two millennia old. But during the Edo period (1603-1868), irezumi became inseparable from the art and manufacturing of Japanese woodblock prints. Both woodblock print artists and tattoo artists adopted the title hori, meaning ‘to carve’. Many of the same tools and ink used in printmaking workshops were also utilized in tattoo shops. Tattoo designs which first appeared in woodblock prints were subsequently adopted by actors in Kabuki theater, as well as laborers and firemen (who decorated themselves in intricate tattoos as a form of spiritual protection). Irezumi were also used for decorative, ceremonial and punitive purposes. Edo-era irezumi designs (and the woodblock prints that catapulted them into popularity) incorporated dragons, animals, samurai, geisha, and Shinto spirit masks. The exhibit at the Asian Art Museum – which originated at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston – features 60 prints by artist Utagawa Kuniyoshi 歌川 国芳 (1797–1861) and his contemporaries, including Kuniyoshi’s influential print series "One Hundred and Eight Heroes of the Popular Water Margin". The Asian Art Museum will also hold a 6/13 panel discussion about Floating World tattoo art and a live tattooing event on 7/13. For details about the exhibit, visit bit.ly/AsianArtTattoo. And learn more about the intertwined history of tattoos and woodblock prints via Hyperallergic, at bit.ly/HyperATattoo

CULCON-inspired campaign TeamUp presented on best practices at NAFSA. #NAFSA2019
05/31/2019

CULCON-inspired campaign TeamUp presented on best practices at NAFSA. #NAFSA2019

Robert Page, advisor to student media and director of digital projects in the Queens Knight School of Communication, presented in a panel on educational programs to strengthen US-Japan relationships at the NAFSA conference for international educators, May 29 in Washington, D.C. The panel was led by the TeamUp program of the Japan-US Friendship Commission and the US-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange (CULCON).

Angie Edwards, director of the Queens Myrta Pulliam Center for International Education, led a roundtable discussion of senior international officers from liberal arts institutions from the US and abroad. Edwards and Page later participated in a workshop on Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) at the American Council on Education headquarters, led by Kansai University of Osaka, Japan. They also were invited to a reception at the Japanese Embassy.

At the conference, Edwards and Page met with Crockett Sewell ‘17, a former intern in the Pulliam Center and now an international admissions counselor at Purdue University.

Another fantastic post from Arts Japan 2020, a product of the CULCON Arts Dialogue Committee, chaired by Anne Nishimura ...
05/23/2019

Another fantastic post from Arts Japan 2020, a product of the CULCON Arts Dialogue Committee, chaired by Anne Nishimura Morse and Hiroyuki Shimatani.

The decorated manhole covers that are found throughout Japan have inspired a festival, a popular book, a growing collectors’ market and media coverage from Atlas Obscura, CBS and elsewhere. From the 1950s to 1980s, the cast plates that covered sewers in Japan used simple geometric patterns, such as the “Tokyo” and “Nagoya” designs. In 1985, civil servant Yasutake Kameda began using intricate manhole designs to drum up enthusiasm for a modernization of the country’s sewer system. There are now 6,000 different manhole cover designs spread around the country. Most municipalities in Japan have customized covers: Osaka’s manhole designs feature its castle; Kobe’s feature its zoo; the main motif in Kyoto is a turtle (a symbol of wisdom and longevity); and Takasaki's covers honor the city’s popular fireworks festival. Trees are the most common design, followed by landscapes and flowers. The ornate manhole covers are carved from aluminum, which is used to make sand molds for casting. The design is often imprinted in the cover, but some covers feature colored resins that are flooded into voids (like how enamel is used to decorate jewelry). Hinode Suido, the largest manhole manufacturer in Japan, produces about 200 covers a day. The affinity for manhole covers taps into a nationwide fondness for hobbies that involve travel (like collecting transit stamps and riding obscure trains). Manhole cover enthusiasts travel to distant areas of the country to photograph covers or collect pencil rubbings of them, known as takuhon. Trading cards featuring manhole designs are also popular collectors’ items, and can command steep prices in online auctions. There’s also a Japan Society of Manhole Covers, and a Manhole Cover Festival (details bit.ly/mhcoverfest). Remo Camerota has documented many of the notable manhole designs in his book DrainSpotting (highlights at bit.ly/drainspot), and photographer S. Morita’s Flickr account (flic.kr/s/aHsj7pxNQi) has many images of colorful and creative manhole covers. Meanwhile, check out articles and videos about Japan’s manhole cover art from CBS (at bit.ly/CBSJapan1) and Atlas Obscura (at bit.ly/AtlasJapanCovers).

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McPherson Square Metro Station, Farragut North Metro

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Monday 09:00 - 17:30
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:30
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:30
Thursday 09:00 - 17:30
Friday 09:00 - 17:30

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(202) 653-9800

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Hi CULCON, What type of discussion are you having? Can I have an example?
Great panel and community discussion on alumni engagement today. Thanks for an insightful, informative program!