Atomic Heritage Foundation

Atomic Heritage Foundation Dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the Manhattan Project and the Atomic Age, AHF's goal is to provide the public a better understanding of the past and a basis for addressing scientific, political, and ethical issues of the 21st century.
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Current Projects Preservation -Legislative mobilization for a Manhattan Project National Historical Park -Collaborating with key stakeholders on preservation and restoration efforts in Los Alamos, Hanford, Oak Ridge, Wendover, and other Manhattan Project sites. Interpretation -Collecting new oral histories and adding more from our collection to our "Voices of the Manhattan Project" website, which launched in November 2012 -Developing a series of "Ranger in Your Pocket" tours with video and audio vignettes on: Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Hanford's pioneers, and innovation in the Manhattan Project -Designing a traveling exhibit on the Manhattan Project to be featured in history and science museums nationwide Education -Comprehensive development of Manhattan Project online resources, including lesson plans -Developing and publishing a comprehensive guidebook to the Manhattan Project sites

Mission: The Atomic Heritage Foundation (AHF), founded by Cynthia Kelly in 2002, is a nonprofit organization in Washington, DC, dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the Manhattan Project and the Atomic Age and its legacy. The Foundation's goal is to provide the public not only a better understanding of the past but also a basis for addressing scientific, technical, political, social and ethical issues of the 21st century. AHF works with Congress, the Department of Energy, National Park Service, state and local governments, nonprofit organizations and the former Manhattan Project communities to preserve and interpret historic sites and develop useful and accesible educational materials for veterans, teachers, and the general public.

Operating as usual

Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the ending of WWII.
08/13/2020
National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the ending of WWII.

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Manhattan Project, the Atomic Heritage Foundation has produced a special edition of its anthology, The Manhattan Project: The Birth of the Atomic Bomb in the Words of Its Creators, Eyewitnesses, and Historians. The book is published by Black Dog & Leventhal, a subsidiary of Hachette Book Group, and is available here: https://www.blackdogandleventhal.com/titles/cynthia-c-kelly/the-manhattan-project/9780762471270/

We love #ManhattanProjectMonday!
08/03/2020
National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

We love #ManhattanProjectMonday!

This #ManhattanProjectMonday, we’re highlighting Bob Cook, a nuclear engineer. Cook had a long career with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission & worked as a consultant for the Yakama Nation. His interview describes problems he identified with the Basalt Waste Isolation Project, as well as opinions on the ethics of governmental decision making and risk assessments in relation to the health of Hanford-area residents. #nuclearengineer #nuclearhistory #manhattanproject

Would you like to become a Smithsonian Member?! Now is your chance, and it comes with so many amazing benefits! When you...
05/01/2020

Would you like to become a Smithsonian Member?! Now is your chance, and it comes with so many amazing benefits! When you join the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History at any membership level, you can add-on the Smithsonian Affiliate Membership for only $25 more. These unique and awesome benefits include a one-year subscription to either the Smithsonian Magazine (12 issues) OR the Air & Space Magazine (seven issues), reciprocal admission/discount benefits at other participating Smithsonian Affiliate Organizations, and more! https://www.nuclearmuseum.org/support/membership/

Did you know when you visit the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History you are greeted by the Periodic Table of El...
04/23/2020

Did you know when you visit the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History you are greeted by the Periodic Table of Elements in our lobby area known as Periodic Hall? How about some other cool facts? Did you know all the elements above Uranium in the Periodic Table are man-made and radioactive? Did you know Uranium (atomic number 92) is the heaviest naturally occurring element found on Earth? (the atomic mass shown on the Uranium tile, 238, is for the isotope with the longest half-life, U-238)

Do you enjoy digging deeper into the fascinating history of the early atomic age and Cold War? Become an Atomic History ...
04/14/2020

Do you enjoy digging deeper into the fascinating history of the early atomic age and Cold War? Become an Atomic History Patron of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History, and you will receive exclusive benefits with your membership that allow you to delve into the museum's archives, explore newly acquired artifacts, and learn from our amazing Curatorial department. (PS, you will also get into over 370 museums and science centers nationwide for free!) Check out the benefits today! https://www.nuclearmuseum.org/support/membership/atomic-history-patron-member/

04/11/2020

The Manhattan Project National Historical Park at
Oak Ridge, Tennessee announces a contest to create models of K-25! The mile-long gaseous diffusion plant at Oak Ridge played a critical role in producing enriched uranium for the bomb dropped on August 6, 1945 on Hiroshima. During the Cold War it produced fuel for the new nuclear power industry. See MAPR April 20 e-newsletter for more information.

The collaboration between the Atomic Heritage Foundation and the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History brings you...
04/09/2020

The collaboration between the Atomic Heritage Foundation and the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History brings you a glimpse into some of the largest artifacts held in the collection of this amazing museum! Click here to see the behemoth B-29 Superfortress.

TBT to that time in 2015 where we restored the exterior of our B-29 Superfortress, our most photographed object in our collection. Total restoration cost for this behemoth airplane was $110,000. As a non-profit museum, we successfully raised this large amount of money through fundraising initiatives, and it remains one of only 17 complete aircraft of its kind left in existence. Check out our before and after photos!

In a time of uncertainty and difficulty, we would like to celebrate the heroes who are making a difference during this p...
04/07/2020

In a time of uncertainty and difficulty, we would like to celebrate the heroes who are making a difference during this pandemic by highlighting individuals who impacted the world with their hard work and determination during another unprecedented time in history. Let us introduce you to Rosemary Lane, Head Nurse at Oak Ridge Hospital during the Manhattan Project. Watch her interview and learn about the moment she found out Oak Ridge was helping to manufacture an atomic bomb. https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/rosemary-lanes-interview

An interesting fact from the Curator of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History. Did you know that the most exp...
04/02/2020

An interesting fact from the Curator of the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History. Did you know that the most expensive project of WWII was not the Manhattan Project but the design and building of the B-29 Bomber? The Manhattan Project cost approximately two billion dollars while the B-29 cost approximately three billion dollars. The B-29 was at the time the most advanced bomber in the world. It featured among other advances, a pressurized cabin, remote control machine guns, and ground radar.

Today in History: 13 February, 196060 years ago today, “France tests its first atomic bomb.” Learn more about the French...
02/13/2020
French Nuclear Program

Today in History:
13 February, 1960
60 years ago today, “France tests its first atomic bomb.”
Learn more about the French Nuclear Program on the Atomic Heritage Foundation's page:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/french-nuclear-program
Check out other interesting events in the history of nuclear science here:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/timeline

France became the fourth country to possess nuclear weapons after its first test in 1960. While development was slowed by the impact of World War II, the achievements of early French research were critical for nuclear development worldwide.

02/06/2020
Chain Fountain - Bite Scize - Demo Difficulty 1.2 National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Our partners at the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History are making videos to make science accessible on their NEW YouTube channel. Their series, BITe SCIze show fun demonstrations to do with the whole family, and more series are in the works. They mentioned the Atomic Heritage Foundation in the newest video! If you’re logged in to YouTube, you can see the info card linking to an amazing Fat Man video from the Atomic Heritage Foundation check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DEVc8PasPs
Watch more of their videos here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCqG_DH7jbf3dr2T7tvlV0w

The Mould Effect is ball chain "jumping" from a glass before gravity takes over. It is when science has the look of magic. Very easy, and very safe. Difficul...

Voices of the Manhattan Project:“Bill Ginkel served as the Manager of the Idaho Operations Office for the Atomic Energy ...
02/05/2020
Bill Ginkel's Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project:
“Bill Ginkel served as the Manager of the Idaho Operations Office for the Atomic Energy Commission. In this interview, he describes his experience working at the facility beginning in 1950. He recalls the pioneering work conducted at the laboratory and the occasional methodological divide between the scientists and engineers. He also explains the transformative effects the influx of nuclear scientists had upon the local community and the state, and why the area was referred to as ‘The Site.’”
Listen to the interview here:
https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/bill-ginkels-interview
Listen to more oral histories on the Voices of the Manhattan Project site here:
https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories

Cindy Kelly: All right. We can start with something very simple. Tell us your name and spell it. Bill Ginkel: I’m Bill Ginkel, G-i-n-k-e-l. I came to Idaho in 1950 out of the Manhattan Project and its successor agency. I was actually employed by the Atomic Energy Commission in Oak Ridge in connect...

Dr. Dieter Gruen, a Manhattan Project veteran who worked at Y-12 in Oak Ridge, is invited to the State of the Union as t...
02/03/2020

Dr. Dieter Gruen, a Manhattan Project veteran who worked at Y-12 in Oak Ridge, is invited to the State of the Union as the guest of Congressman Sean Caster of Illinois (IL-06). Rep. Caster nominated Gruen for the Presidential Medal of Freedom on November 15, 2019 in recognition of his lifetime contributions to science and national security and continuing work on climate change. To learn more, see AHF's two oral histories at https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/donald-amess-interview/trackback?title=Dieter+Gruen&tid=All&tid_1=All&tid_2=All.
Hat's off to Dieter!

Today in History: 2 February, 194575 years ago today, “Los Alamos, NM receives its first plutonium from Hanford, WA.”Lea...
02/02/2020
Los Alamos, NM

Today in History:
2 February, 1945
75 years ago today, “Los Alamos, NM receives its first plutonium from Hanford, WA.”
Learn more about Los Alamos on the Atomic Heritage Foundation's page:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/location/los-alamos-nm
Check out other interesting events in the history of nuclear science here:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/timeline

Los Alamos, New Mexico, was the site of Project Y, or the top-secret atomic weapons laboratory directed by J. Robert Oppenheimer. The site was so secret that one mailbox, PO Box 1663, served as the mailing address for the entire town. The mountains allowed the scientists ample opportunity to relax,....

“Since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, people in the United States and around the world have reacted to the atom...
01/29/2020
Atomic Culture

“Since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, people in the United States and around the world have reacted to the atomic bomb with joy, devastation, hope, fear, and many other emotions. We have used cultural expressions to convey these sentiments, a phenomenon known as atomic culture. Atomic culture has manifested itself in popular culture, such as films, music, and fashion, and in high culture, such as literature, poetry, and theater. Atomic culture is also prevalent in the daily lives of Americans, becoming so ordinary that we don’t even notice the extent to which the bomb has permeated our society.”
Learn more about atomic culture here:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/atomic-culture
Learn about more topics related to atomic history on the Atomic Heritage Foundation site here:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history

Since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, people in the United States and around the world have developed cultural expressions of the atomic bomb.

William J. Broad of the New York Times wrote a story in Science Times today about the fourth spy at the Los Alamos labor...
01/29/2020
Fourth Spy at Los Alamos Knew A-Bomb’s Inner Secrets

William J. Broad of the New York Times wrote a story in Science Times today about the fourth spy at the Los Alamos laboratory. Code named Godsend, the identity of the spy, Oscar Seborer, was uncovered by two historians, Harvey Kiehr and John Earl Haynes this fall.

The latest story is that Seborer provided highly significant information about the inner workings of the bomb. As Broad reported, the information potentially recasts "a mundane espionage case as one of history's most damaging."

Here is the link to read more:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/27/science/manhattan-project-nuclear-spy.html

Historians recently uncovered another Soviet spy in the U.S. atomic bomb program. Fresh disclosures show he worked on the device’s explosive trigger.

Today in History:26 January, 193983 years ago today, “Niels Bohr publicly announces the discovery of fission at an annua...
01/26/2020
Niels Bohr

Today in History:
26 January, 1939
83 years ago today, “Niels Bohr publicly announces the discovery of fission at an annual theoretical physics conference at George Washington University in Washington, DC.”
Learn more about Neils Bohr on the Atomic Heritage Foundation's page:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/profile/niels-bohr
Check out other interesting events in the history of nuclear science here:
https://www.atomicheritage.org/history/timeline

Niels Bohr (1885-1962) was a Danish physicist and winner of the 1922 Nobel Prize in Physics. Bohr began his work on the Manhattan Project after fleeing to Sweden from Denmark because of German occupation in 1943. Originally he was brought to London, working with the British Tube Alloys nuclear weapo...

Construction on the Alexander Guest House at Oak Ridge, TN, 1943. During the Manhattan Project, project leaders includin...
01/23/2020

Construction on the Alexander Guest House at Oak Ridge, TN, 1943. During the Manhattan Project, project leaders including J. Robert Oppenheimer and General Leslie R. Groves stayed at the inn. Today, the building has been restored and is a senior assisted living center with historic artifacts in the lobby.

Photos (left to right) courtesy Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office. #tbt; Oak Ridge Today; and Oak Ridge historian D. Ray Smith.

January 1945: Substantial production of ~0.85% enriched uranium begins at the S-50 Plant at Oak Ridge, TN. 10 of 21 rack...
01/22/2020

January 1945: Substantial production of ~0.85% enriched uranium begins at the S-50 Plant at Oak Ridge, TN. 10 of 21 racks go into operation.

General Groves insisted the S-50 plant be built in just 90 days and be closely patterned after the Navy's pilot plant in Philadelphia. Philip Abelson (below) who designed the thermal diffusion process plant for the Navy and the H.K. Ferguson Company had the plant operating in just 69 days.

For more, see AHF's S-50 videos at https://www.atomicheritage.org/tour-stop/s-50-plant#.XijIP-dKjvc.

Voices of the Manhattan Project:“In this rare interview, J. Robert Oppenheimer talks about the organization of the Manha...
01/22/2020
J. Robert Oppenheimer's Interview

Voices of the Manhattan Project:
“In this rare interview, J. Robert Oppenheimer talks about the organization of the Manhattan Project and some of the scientists that he helped to recruit during the earliest days of the project. Oppenheimer discusses some of the biggest challenges that scientists faced during the project, including developing a sound method for implosion and purifying plutonium, which he declares was the most difficult aspect of the project. He discusses the chronology of the project and his first conversation with General Leslie Groves. Oppenheimer recalls his daily routine at Los Alamos, including taking his son Peter to nursery school.” Listen to the interview here: https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories/j-robert-oppenheimers-interview
Listen to more oral histories on the Voices of the Manhattan Project site here:
https://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org/oral-histories

Stephane Groueff: I want to start from the beginning. My book, I intend to start with the year 1942 because otherwise, there is no limit. A few months before the Manhattan District and decision to go— J. Robert Oppenheimer: The decision was actually made on December 6, to take the thing seriously....

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General information

Visit "Voices of the Manhattan Project," a digital archive of the oral history collections of the Atomic Heritage Foundation and the Los Alamos Historical Society. http://www.manhattanprojectvoices.org Donate to support our work here: https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/AtomicHeritageFoundation Check out our Youtube site, with educational videos on the Manhattan Project and interviews with Manhattan Project veterans: http://www.youtube.com/user/AtomicHeritage Follow us on Twitter @AtomicHeritage! You can subscribe to our monthly e-newsletters, which provide updates of our work and information on the history and legacy of the Manhattan Project, here. http://ow.ly/knqRA

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