Skubes Skubes is creating the largest digital content library for education using real teachers and focusing on K-12 students. Skubes.com is designed to become the Internet's top educational community/website for children in kindergarten through the 12th grade.

This unique website community will provide educational videos, all featuring accredited teachers and all created to adhere to nationally accepted educational standards. The initial videos, available in English, will cover math, science and language arts. Our goal is to become the primary online source for "all things educational" for students in kindergarten through the 12th grade. Students will h

This unique website community will provide educational videos, all featuring accredited teachers and all created to adhere to nationally accepted educational standards. The initial videos, available in English, will cover math, science and language arts. Our goal is to become the primary online source for "all things educational" for students in kindergarten through the 12th grade. Students will h

Operating as usual

Five Harmful Parenting Styles and How to Correct Them - Growing Leaders
07/10/2021
Five Harmful Parenting Styles and How to Correct Them - Growing Leaders

Five Harmful Parenting Styles and How to Correct Them - Growing Leaders

Growing up, my son loved participating in a community theatre program in Atlanta. He is a true thespian. He loves the drama of a Broadway show. He loves the drama of television or movies. He loves the drama of musical theatre. Unfortunately, he’s seen a little too much drama from the adults in his...

How Emotional Intelligence Increases Students’ Influence - Growing Leaders
01/28/2021
How Emotional Intelligence Increases Students’ Influence - Growing Leaders

How Emotional Intelligence Increases Students’ Influence - Growing Leaders

10shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Chuck was a bully on my high school campus. Back in the day, everyone in our class dreaded encountering him. On a good day, he was merely rude or offensive. On a bad day, he’d be downright abusive or violent. Chuck came from a troubled backgroun...

One Simple Way to Help Teens Mature in the 21st Century - Growing Leaders
12/23/2020
One Simple Way to Help Teens Mature in the 21st Century - Growing Leaders

One Simple Way to Help Teens Mature in the 21st Century - Growing Leaders

0shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn I marvel when I watch a college freshman quarterback play well under the pressure of TV cameras and 90,000 fans watching in person. My goodness, the poor guy is still a teenager. We’ve all seen the opposite, however, where a young athlete crumble...

The Dark Side of Alexa and Siri for Your Kids - Growing Leaders
12/13/2020
The Dark Side of Alexa and Siri for Your Kids - Growing Leaders

The Dark Side of Alexa and Siri for Your Kids - Growing Leaders

59shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn This summer, I witnessed something I never anticipated in a young child. I was visiting a friend’s home who had three young children. They also have Alexa, a smart speaker in their kitchen. His kids are growing up with artificial intelligence ar...

Four Steps to Build Self Discipline and Willpower in Students - Growing Leaders
12/13/2020
Four Steps to Build Self Discipline and Willpower in Students - Growing Leaders

Four Steps to Build Self Discipline and Willpower in Students - Growing Leaders

8shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn One of the most fascinating studies I’ve read in the last decade was conducted by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Angela Duckworth and Martin Seligman. Just over ten years ago they performed a longitudinal study on two groups of adolescen...

https://quillette.com/2019/12/01/when-disruptive-students-are-coddled-the-whole-class-suffers/?fbclid=IwAR2D1yzEmZtVe8we...
12/01/2019
When Disruptive Students Are Coddled, the Whole Class Suffers - Quillette

https://quillette.com/2019/12/01/when-disruptive-students-are-coddled-the-whole-class-suffers/?fbclid=IwAR2D1yzEmZtVe8wewl06OXi4fLeFAt7P-Sz8RC_u1qmzI-4ZEDSZVPReTCE

Last month, NBC Nightly News aired a segment on the latest classroom-management technique to sweep America’s schools: “room clears”: When a child throws a tantrum that could physically endanger his peers, teachers evacuate all of the other students from the classroom until the troublemaker has...

Bored Teachers
10/25/2019

Bored Teachers

Seriously though.

Bored Teachers
10/18/2019

Bored Teachers

🤔

Bored Teachers
10/05/2019

Bored Teachers

All the time.

08/22/2019
Tim Elmore

Tim Elmore

This month, American parents received two life-lessons about mishandling money with their young adult children. The research on what’s trending has become clear. Let me cut straight to the point.

1. Parents Take Responsibility Too Often When We Should Let It Go

The results of a nationwide survey were recently released: “Parents help their kids in a variety of ways, and that includes financial support, even when their children grow older. Nearly half of millennials (46%) get some level of financial help from mom and dad on a monthly basis, according to a new survey released by Money Under 30.”

Did you catch that? Nearly half of these adults can’t do adulthood on their own.

While I agree—sometimes our adult children need our help, I wonder if our help simply kicks the can down the road. When young adults prolong dependence on parents, they delay their ability to shoulder responsibility. For example, the top item kids request financial help with, according to the survey, is cell phone bills. They feel their smartphone is a must. But is it really? While it’s hard to imagine life without a portable device, what if we taught them to distinguish “needs” from “wants”? What if we showed them how to go without other items if they felt they had to keep the phone—like manicures or video games? Or, perhaps even learn to live for a while without the phone? Parents must enable kids to learn resourcefulness.

Millions of today’s young adults are forced to delay professional goals because we’ve failed to teach them how to do without luxuries. We unwittingly taught them that luxuries are necessities: smartphones, eating out, brand name clothes, nice big TVs. You get the idea. And now, their big “life goals” are pushed further away.

Almost 8 in 10 young adults agree they’re being delayed in reaching their life goals by money. While I understand the economy (cost of living vs. earnings) has made life hard for a young professional, I have also witnessed how too many parents prevented their teens or young adults from getting started earlier on working a job or savings. We spared them the hassle as a teen—but perhaps created a hassle later on.

Question: Have you created dependency when you should have created autonomy?

2. Parents Let Go of Responsibility Too Often When We Should Take It On

There is another reality taking place today, however. Parents are finding loopholes in the education system for their high school students and avoiding responsibility.

Parents of teenagers are delegating custody of their kids for a college scholarship.

“Parents are giving up legal guardianship of their children during their junior or senior year in high school to someone else — a friend, aunt, cousin or grandparent. The guardianship status then allows the students to declare themselves financially independent of their families so they can qualify for federal, state and university aid,” a ProPublica Illinois investigation found.

Andy Borst, director of undergraduate admissions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says “It’s a scam.” Why you ask? Borst says, “Wealthy families are manipulating the financial aid process to be eligible for financial aid they would not be otherwise eligible for. They are taking away opportunities from families that really need it.” Truth be told, more than 70,000 eligible students in Illinois alone won’t get this money because it’s been taken.

So, in this case, parents are actually delegating responsibility for their kids when they should be modeling responsibility.

As a parent who’s paid for two college tuitions from private universities, I understand the debt load parents or students can accumulate from higher education. Tuition is too high in our country today. It was not easy for my wife and I to help our kids graduate college. But in avoiding this responsibility through a legal loophole, we actually teach our kids to act like “victims” of the system and evade duties that come with life. We start silently communicating we deserve a special break because the system is bad. Soon, however, the legal loopholes become illegal loopholes. One day, mark my words, our kids will have pushed the limits on taking illegal advantage of subscriptions or stolen property just because they can. They see themselves as victims. They feel it’s less of a crime than what those vendors are committing.

Question: Have you accidentally taught your kids to act like victims and avoid duty?

Let’s commit to long-term thinking.

1. Let’s delegate responsibility to our young adults for their sake, so they can learn what it means to experience self-efficacy and autonomy.
2. Let’s assume responsibility for our young adults for their sake, so they can see what it looks like to act from honor and justice.

The Case for Not Allowing Test Retakes
08/21/2019
The Case for Not Allowing Test Retakes

The Case for Not Allowing Test Retakes

As more educators drop penalties for late work and allow students to redo tests, a high school teacher says that traditional policies are better for the majority of students.

04/23/2019
Tim Elmore

Tim Elmore

The rise in anxiety, depression and panic attacks in our students today should give every one of us pause. It is astoundingly high. Anxiety and depression in high school kids have been on the rise since the early 2000s after several years of plateau. It is a reality that crosses all demographics, urban, suburban and rural; and among adolescents who are college bound and among those who are not. Teens from different ethnicities and genders are all experiencing the issues associated with angst.

The Department of Health and Human Services reports that in 2015, some three million teens, ages 12-17, had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. More than two million report experiencing depression that impairs their daily functioning. Sadly, the Child Mind Institute informed us that one in five teens or young adults struggle with a mental illness or disorder and two thirds of that group are either undiagnosed or untreated. Most just live with it.

Three Big Reasons:

Mental health has become a soaring problem. While some students have biological reasons for anxiety and depression, most do not. Too many of our children are growing up in relatively stable families, but our 21st century culture has given us (without our asking) three huge realities we didn’t see coming. Before we resort to the use of anti-depressants, let’s examine if these may relieve some of the pain of teens and young adults. They are prevalent in almost every state.

1. Sedentary Lifestyles

Every well-read educator and parent knows America’s problem with childhood obesity. What we often fail to consider is that it’s not just a physical problem, it’s a mental and emotional one, too. The human body is wired for movement. Many people only associate exercise with calories, muscles and fat, but there is so much more going on in the body when we move. In fact, there are hundreds of hormones, enzymes, proteins, and chemical reactions happening while the body is physically active. It enables them to be mentally fit and emotionally stable. Consider the correlation below.

When you exercise, your body releases chemicals called endorphins. These endorphins interact with the receptors in your brain that reduce your perception of pain. Endorphins also trigger a positive feeling in the body, similar to that of morphine and are known to combat depression and anxiety.

Epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine help increase blood flow to muscles for delivery of oxygen and glucose and sharpen mental activity. The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) hormone interacts with the central nervous system. By tripling BDNF production with exercise, it’s possible to improve moods, boost cognitive function and improve memory. When kids are sedentary, these hormones are unable to do their work. In short, we are made to move—and we naturally struggle when sedentary.

2. Solitary Lifestyles

Yes, today’s students are connected virtually through their portable devices, but they are actually spending more time alone than past generations of youth. Teens are dating less, going to a mall with friends less and interacting in person less. Generation Z has proven to be more private than their Millennial predecessors. Why is this? The portable device has overtaken the personal conversation. Screen to screen has overtaken face to face. At first, half the social scientists I studied believed this “new normal” would not hinder the social development of kids. Today, however, the data on these seems clear:

1. Emotional intelligence isn’t developed well on a device.
2. Anxiety levels rise with increased interactions on social media.

Psychologist Jean Twenge concludes that the more students spend time in genuine conversations in the presence of people, anxiety levels drop. Research indicates that less than two hours on social media can actually diminish anxiety and depression levels in students. More than two hours causes students to become vulnerable to rising angst and stress levels. Humans are social creatures, who flourish best in face to face connections.

3. Saturated Lifestyles

Teens today consume thousands of messages a day on social media, email, live interactions and other media outlets. Our brains were not meant to digest this much information. Consider this comparison: the average person today consumes as much information reading the Sunday New York Times as a person consumed during an entire year in the 19th century. Further, our children’s lives are full of extracurricular activities today, complete with two practices a week for soccer plus a game, piano lessons and recitals, karate lessons and of course band practice. A one-frame comic put this new normal in perspective. One small girl says to another as they walk off the soccer field: “Wow! You’ve got 15 minutes between soccer practice and violin lessons? What are you going to do with all that free time?”

Our lives are saturated. Kids are overwhelmed. And they are distracted. Once again, our brains are not built to take in all this activity. Dr. Peter Gray, from Boston College says his greatest concern is not merely the volume of activity but the fact that children are not given much “free play time” where they are in control of their time. Far less than past generations. Today’s kid lives a life that’s supervised and prescribed by adults. This lifestyle leaves them unready to make their own decisions and with an “external locus of control.” Too often, it means they assume a posture that believes someone else will take care of them. One of the greatest needs of our kids is margin in their day; for silence and autonomy; for going outside and making up a game with their friends.

In Summary:

Although we are more educated than ever, our lifestyles may be less healthy than past generations. I believe most adults got ambushed by it all. And our kids suffer:

-Sedentary lifestyles leave them overweight.
-Solitary lifestyles leave them over-indulged.
-Saturated lifestyles leave them overwhelmed.

We must get them moving. A good rule of thumb is to match the hours they have in front of a screen with that many hours in physical activity.

We must get them face-to-face with people and off their phones. One good rule is to match the hours they have on a screen with the same hours socializing in-person.

We must offer them free time to play and control their time. One good rule could be to insure they limit social media time to two hours or less daily.

Parents Are Losing Their Kids to Video Games - Growing Leaders
03/27/2019
Parents Are Losing Their Kids to Video Games - Growing Leaders

Parents Are Losing Their Kids to Video Games - Growing Leaders

1shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Today’s blog is from Andrew McPeak. Andrew is a next gen researcher, speaker, and author for Growing Leaders. I recently read a commentary from a parent in the Chicago Tribune that was equally troubling and hilarious. This dad detailed the strang...

Three Parental Acts That Hinder Students From Becoming Leaders - Growing Leaders
03/26/2019
Three Parental Acts That Hinder Students From Becoming Leaders - Growing Leaders

Three Parental Acts That Hinder Students From Becoming Leaders - Growing Leaders

25shares Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn I just finished meeting with a group of university students. My goal was to ask them how they had adapted to college life. I chose this group of students because every one of them served in leadership roles during high school. I wondered if they.....

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Skubes consist of over 1,00o eduational videos, all created and taught by working teachers. Covering 1st thru the 12th grade, the videos can be found on our YouTube channel and the lesson slides used in the videos can be found and acquired on our lesson slide site.

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9KphGILVuZtBKBGO7Z0Mug?view_as=public

Lesson Slides: https://skubes.store

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