City of Albuquerque Environmental Health Department

City of Albuquerque Environmental Health Department The mission of the Environmental Health Department is to responsively and professionally serve the p
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It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! Flu can be wild for kids — but a flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk...
12/06/2023

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week! Flu can be wild for kids — but a flu vaccine has been shown to reduce the risk of illness, flu related hospitalization, and death. There’s still time to get your child vaccinated — talk to their health care provider.

ICYMI - our composting pilot project is underway! We're working to divert food scraps in two local kitchens from landfil...
12/06/2023

ICYMI - our composting pilot project is underway! We're working to divert food scraps in two local kitchens from landfills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – Going green is a long term focus for the City of Albuquerque that now includes a pilot project testing food composting. This comes as part of the city’s Climate…

December 4th is  , but most days are Wildlife Conservation Day here at EHD! Our goal is the cooperative coexistence of b...
12/04/2023

December 4th is , but most days are Wildlife Conservation Day here at EHD! Our goal is the cooperative coexistence of both humans and wildlife in our city.

From tiny insects to large mammals, Bernalillo County alone is home to over 850 species, 19 of which are Threatened or Endangered. Even in the heart of Downtown Albuquerque, it is common to see birds, reptiles, insects, and mammals sharing our city as our urban wildlife neighbors-- much to the surprise of many of our human residents!

One of the many services EHD’s Urban Biology Division provides to the city is educational information & situation-specific consultations free of charge to promote cooperative coexistence for humans and wildlife. Learn more: https://ow.ly/IPO450Qfbso

This National Influenza Vaccination Week, there’s still time to get vaccinated against flu’s wildest symptoms. Getting a...
12/04/2023

This National Influenza Vaccination Week, there’s still time to get vaccinated against flu’s wildest symptoms. Getting a flu vaccine each year is the best way to help prevent potentially serious flu illness from roaring through your community. Talk to your health care provider.

Our   is the Scaled Quail!While the Twelve Days of Christmas talks about a partridge in a pear tree, one can argue that ...
12/04/2023

Our is the Scaled Quail!

While the Twelve Days of Christmas talks about a partridge in a pear tree, one can argue that a pear tree isn’t really where you would expect to find one of these ground-dwelling birds anyway. The Duke City is not home to any partridge, but it is home to two types of their very close relatives—quail—and today, we’re talking about the Scaled Quail.

Quail and partridge are ground-dwelling birds with excellent running skills, but neither are known for being the most skilled fliers. We normally associate the idea of quail with the distinctive black ‘top knot’ of feathers on top of their head that bob about as they run, but the Scaled Quail has a bit of a white mohawk called a crest instead. Often called ‘Cottontops’ for this crest, Scaled Quail gets their name from the distinctive scaly pattern of the feathers across their breast and back.

Although not our most commonly spotted quail species, the Scaled Quail is a common arid land bird of the Southwestern US and Northern Mexico. Just like our other quail species, the Gambel’s Quail, Scaled Quail are still fairly frequently spotted running through the open grassland areas of the West Mesa and Foothills. Remember to always enjoy wildlife from a distance!

Health insurance, paid parental leave, retirement, sick leave, vacation, paid holidays... need we go on? Come work for t...
12/04/2023

Health insurance, paid parental leave, retirement, sick leave, vacation, paid holidays... need we go on? Come work for the City you love! Apply today: https://bit.ly/3Nbcpzu

Position Summary Supervise, plan and coordinate a variety of environmental compliance and protection activities and operations within an assigned division of the Environmental Health Department including either air pollution control, consumer protection, environmental services, urban biology or v...

Save the Date: Monday, December 4 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm for a Justice 40 Committee meeting centered around climate action...
11/30/2023

Save the Date: Monday, December 4 from 2:00 to 4:00 pm for a Justice 40 Committee meeting centered around climate action planning and the Climate Pollution Reduction Grant. Hear updates on the grant, learn about proposed projects and their impacts, and provide input that will help guide current and future projects.

Learn more: https://ow.ly/QioL50Qaxhr.

It's the end of  ! Check out these amazing staches that rocked the month & swipe for some surprise participants! 🧔🤩
11/30/2023

It's the end of ! Check out these amazing staches that rocked the month & swipe for some surprise participants! 🧔🤩

Coyotes also call ABQ their home! Coexist with coyotes by:➡️Leashing your dog when walking or hiking➡️Make your yard unw...
11/29/2023

Coyotes also call ABQ their home! Coexist with coyotes by:
➡️Leashing your dog when walking or hiking
➡️Make your yard unwelcoming to coyotes
➡️Don’t use rodenticides around your house, yard, and neighborhood

Learn more at the link in bio

We've got an awesome new opportunity for a Carbon Pollution Reduction Grant Manager in our Sustainability office! Check ...
11/28/2023

We've got an awesome new opportunity for a Carbon Pollution Reduction Grant Manager in our Sustainability office! Check out the full description and apply: https://ow.ly/l6G750QawOU. 🌎🌍

This week’s   is the Long-tailed Weasel! No, that’s not someone’s cat snake; that’s a native weasel! Long-tailed weasels...
11/27/2023

This week’s is the Long-tailed Weasel!

No, that’s not someone’s cat snake; that’s a native weasel! Long-tailed weasels look a lot like domestic ferrets, as they are close cousins in the Mustela genus, but they have a very different temperament. While domestic European Ferrets can make delightful pets, the Long-tailed Weasel is definitely not the kind of furry friend you want to invite into your home.

Native to almost all of North and Central America, their appearance changes depending on where they live. Ones around the Duke City have a brown body with a cream or tan belly and white patches on their face that give them a bit of a panda or raccoon-like appearance. They average around 18” in length, including their bushy tails with a distinctive black tip.

Ferocious predators, Long-tailed Weasels eat other mammals such as mice, ground squirrels and gophers—often taking down prey 2-3x its size without trouble. Their metabolism is so quick that they must eat nearly 40% of their body weight daily. That’s the equivalent of an average (150lb) human eating 60 POUNDS of food a day just to stay alive!

Although rather quick and evasive, they have been spotted around town occasionally—including by the Critter Crew. Your best bets to try to see one of these cute little predators as they hop across the landscape are in relatively undisturbed areas near the bosque, foothills and valleys. Remember to always enjoy wildlife from a distance!

The City is actively looking for our next Environmental Health Supervisor! Will it be you? Check out the listing and app...
11/26/2023

The City is actively looking for our next Environmental Health Supervisor! Will it be you? Check out the listing and apply today! Not for you? We have open positions in multiple departments. View them all at cabq.gov/jobs. https://bit.ly/47UyHxD

Position Summary Supervise, plan and coordinate a variety of environmental compliance and protection activities and operations within an assigned division of the Environmental Health Department including either air pollution control, consumer protection, environmental services, urban biology or v...

What if your work directly contributed to a better quality of life for the City of Albuquerque? Find out how you can mak...
11/24/2023

What if your work directly contributed to a better quality of life for the City of Albuquerque? Find out how you can make an impact – apply today to be our next Senior Environmental Health Scientist (Air Quality Permits Div.)! https://bit.ly/47rJG1H

Position Summary Lead, oversee and participate in the more complex and difficult work involved in the development and implementation of short and long range plans, programs and special projects in the field of municipal environmental health; implement strategies for achieving improved environment...

To make sure food stays safe to eat through the weekend, all perishable items should be refrigerated within two hours of...
11/23/2023

To make sure food stays safe to eat through the weekend, all perishable items should be refrigerated within two hours of when they finished cooking. After two hours, perishable food will be in the Danger Zone (40 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit) too long, which is when bacteria can multiply quickly and cause the food to become unsafe. If foods have been left out for more than two hours, they should be discarded.

Thanksgiving is almost here! 🦃 Stay safe this holiday and protect yourself from foodborne illness. Make sure your turkey...
11/22/2023

Thanksgiving is almost here! 🦃 Stay safe this holiday and protect yourself from foodborne illness. Make sure your turkey reaches an internal temperature of 165 F. Use a food thermometer to measure the internal temperature in three parts: the thickest part of the breast, the innermost part of the wing and the innermost part of the thigh.

We had a blast last week at the Small Business Resource Fair! Helping small businesses navigate permitting processes was...
11/21/2023

We had a blast last week at the Small Business Resource Fair! Helping small businesses navigate permitting processes was a great way to spend the day.

It's the perfect time to visit the new viewing platforms at the Candelaria Nature Preserve! Can you guess what critter m...
11/21/2023

It's the perfect time to visit the new viewing platforms at the Candelaria Nature Preserve! Can you guess what critter made these little tracks? Gather your curiosity and come explore what nature has to offer! Remember to always enjoy wildlife from a distance.

Check out the Sustainability pilot project to divert food waste from Expora's concessions (run by Three Sisters Kitchen)...
11/20/2023

Check out the Sustainability pilot project to divert food waste from Expora's concessions (run by Three Sisters Kitchen) and Senior Affairs CASA Kitchen! Little Green Bucket is transporting scraps to Soilutions to be transformed into high-quality compost, creating a positive impact on our environment. The pilot has already diverted 164 cubic feet of material from the landfill!

In honor of Thanksgiving, this week's   is the Wild Turkey! Likely to be found on many dinner tables this week (well, th...
11/20/2023

In honor of Thanksgiving, this week's is the Wild Turkey!

Likely to be found on many dinner tables this week (well, their domesticated cousins, anyway), this iconic bird has been a piece of North American history for thousands of years. Many indigenous groups of what is now the American Southwest and Mexico hunted them for food and feathers, and multiple indigenous cultures domesticated and kept turkey flocks. Archaeological and genetic data shows that turkeys were originally domesticated in the Southwestern United States over 2000 years ago. Spanish explorers took domesticated turkeys from the Aztecs back to Europe and the Pilgrims then brought some of the descendants of these Aztec turkeys back over to North America when they landed in what became Massachusetts in 1620.

And yes, Wild Turkeys have beards! Turkey ‘beards’ are not made up of hairs like we humans have, but rather a special type of modified feather called a filamentous feather. These ‘beards’ are found at the base of the neck, usually growing from a central tuft. In Wild Turkeys, all toms (males) have these beards while only 10-20% of hens (females) have much shorter, whispy beards in the same location. Scientists are unclear about the function of these feathers, but most agree that they are likely related to mate choice in wild turkeys. Length of the beard can be used to tell the age of a tom—young, one-year-old birds have much shorter beards than their older counterparts.

If you’re looking to spot one of these birds, your best bet is along the Rio and in agricultural fields in the North and South Valleys. Multiple sightings of wild turkey have occurred this week near the Rio and Corrales, so they appear to be favoring the northern part of town at the moment, but they’ve definitely made their yearly return. Remember—always enjoy wildlife from a distance!

Thanksgiving is almost here, but when to start prepping the turkey? The best way to thaw your turkey is in the refrigera...
11/17/2023

Thanksgiving is almost here, but when to start prepping the turkey? The best way to thaw your turkey is in the refrigerator and depending on its size, you may want to start thawing today.

We had the BEST time at USDN's annual conference in NOLA! We got to join The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana in r...
11/14/2023

We had the BEST time at USDN's annual conference in NOLA! We got to join The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana in recycling oyster shells. This amazing partnership collects oyster shells from New Orleans-area restaurants and recycles them to restore reefs that help protect Louisiana's eroding coastline.

This week’s   is the Say’s Stink Bug! The Say’s Stink Bug is the most spotted—but not the only-- Pentatomid bug in the D...
11/13/2023

This week’s is the Say’s Stink Bug!

The Say’s Stink Bug is the most spotted—but not the only-- Pentatomid bug in the Duke City. Named for their five-segmented antennae, (penta = five, tomos = section) stink bugs are generally easy to pick out of a crowd due to their distinctive, shield-like shape. The Say’s Stink Bug is approximately a half inch long when fully grown, brown to green in color with a yellow-white border along its shell and 4 distinctive yellow-white spots in a triangle shape along its back.

‘Stink Bug’ is a distinctly American name for the Pentatomids, and people call them stink bugs because of their ability to release various chemicals when threatened, disturbed or even crushed. The smell varies from species to species, ranging from not so bad to very unpleasant. While mostly just food for other critters who don’t mind those defense chemicals, in large numbers they can be considered an agricultural pest.

You can find the Say’s Stink Bug—and other stink bugs—all over the city hanging out in vegetation. Say’s Stink Bugs in particular prefer grasses, so anywhere grasses are found is the best place to spot these critters. Although those smelly chemicals aren’t harmful to people, remember to always observe wildlife from a distance!

We had a blast at the   Annual Conference in New Orleans! Our sustainability team learned so much & developed new ideas ...
11/09/2023

We had a blast at the Annual Conference in New Orleans! Our sustainability team learned so much & developed new ideas to help people & the planet!

The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Air Quality Program is issuing a Health Alert due to blowing dust. Those with respirat...
11/08/2023

The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Air Quality Program is issuing a Health Alert due to blowing dust. Those with respiratory conditions in the City of Albuquerque and Bernalillo County should limit outdoor activity.

Effective: 11:00 PM on 11/8/2023
Expires: 11:00 AM on 11/9/2023

Our   is the Sandhill Crane!Avid Critter Watchers will know that this iconic bird has made its yearly return to the Duke...
11/07/2023

Our is the Sandhill Crane!

Avid Critter Watchers will know that this iconic bird has made its yearly return to the Duke City. Easy to spot with their 3-4 foot heights and bright red patch on their head, these living fossils have been taking to the skies for at least 2.5 million years. If you can’t see them, you often will hear their more than 10 distinctive calls that they use to communicate—and communicate frequently.

Well known for their elaborate courtship dances, these can include leaps, wing stretches and bows. These magnificent birds fly thousands of miles by taking advantage of things like tailwinds and thermals, and even almost as high an altitude as airplanes at 28,000 feet!

Sandhill Cranes can be spotted throughout the city—mainly in the skies flying and making a ruckus. You can also find them browsing agricultural fields in places like the valleys and the Open Space Visitor Center. Hearing them before you see them is not unusual, so keep your eyes and ears open while looking for these winter visitors!

Our colleagues over at CABQ Parks & Recreation will be hosting a FREE event to celebrate the return and cultural significance of these elegant birds this Saturday: https://ow.ly/VOMO50Q5b1k

It's time to Movember! Our Air Quality team is ready to show their   staches with style. Let's see who can rock the best...
11/03/2023

It's time to Movember! Our Air Quality team is ready to show their staches with style. Let's see who can rock the best 'stache this month!

We had a blast at Sierra Club's   event this weekend! 🎉Thanks to everyone who stopped by to learn about the City's susta...
11/01/2023

We had a blast at Sierra Club's event this weekend! 🎉Thanks to everyone who stopped by to learn about the City's sustainability efforts. E-bikes were a huge hit - nothing like a little fresh air & fun.⚡️Did you get to try it out?

This week’s not-actually-spooky   is the Western Black Widow Spider! One of the most misunderstood critters in Albuquerq...
10/30/2023

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Western Black Widow Spider!

One of the most misunderstood critters in Albuquerque is the Western Black Widow Spider. The two things that they are famous for—killing mates and humans— are both false!

Female Western Black Widows are easily identified via their ~1/2”, all-black bodies with fairly large abdomens in contrast to their head and thorax and red ‘hourglass’ shape on their underside. Males are a little bit harder to spot as they are much smaller and are tan with stripes, looking a fair amount like other types of spiders. They are expert pest controllers, eating everything from beetles to wasps and a whole lot of other things in between.

Western Black Widows are a venomous species, and they use that venom to kill their bug prey. Unless you’re a bug caught in their web, they only bite as a last resort when threatened as a defense. While this venom can affect humans and can be very painful and unpleasant, a scientific review was unable to find any human fatalities from Black Widow venom in modern times—only historical reports from long in the past.

Contrary to popular belief, Western Black Widows don’t eat their mates after copulation. Most Western Black Widow males leave the scene after a successful courtship and mate multiple times over their short lifespans. While cannibalism does happen on very rare occasion, they’re far more likely to eat their siblings while they are all young than consume their suitors.

Western Black Widows are found everywhere in the city, including near and inside structures like houses, yards, and block walls. They are one of our most common spider species and are well-adapted to life in the urban environment. Just like with any other wild neighbor, remember to enjoy them from a distance!

The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Air Quality Program is issuing a Health Alert due to blowing dust. Those with respirat...
10/29/2023

The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Air Quality Program is issuing a Health Alert due to blowing dust. Those with respiratory conditions in the City of Albuquerque and Bernalillo County should limit outdoor activity.

Effective: 4:10 PM on 10/29/2023
Expires: 4:00 AM on 10/30/2023

Lurking monsters aren't the only thing to look out for this  - keep your spooky treats safe with these food safety tips!...
10/27/2023

Lurking monsters aren't the only thing to look out for this - keep your spooky treats safe with these food safety tips!

Another full house this week learning about the City’s BRAIN! Northern New Mexico College brought together architects to...
10/27/2023

Another full house this week learning about the City’s BRAIN! Northern New Mexico College brought together architects to learn how the City saves taxpayer money by tracking energy usage across Albuquerque in real time.

Together, we can prevent lead exposure! 💪 Learn how to prevent lead poisoning by joining us and CDC , and  for National ...
10/25/2023

Together, we can prevent lead exposure! 💪 Learn how to prevent lead poisoning by joining us and CDC , and for National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week 2023. More info about preventing lead exposure. 🔍 https://ow.ly/mjTS50Q0niY

There is no safe blood lead level in children. Even low levels of lead in blood can hurt a child’s ability to learn, pay attention, and do well in school. The good news is that childhood lead poisoning is preventable. Learn about common sources of lead and steps to reduce your child’s risk of le...

10/24/2023

It’s October 24th, and you know what that means….. It’s the start of Bat Week! 🦇🦇🦇

Timed to coincide with the spookiest of holidays and International Bat Appreciation Month, (October 24th-31st) is an international celebration of the importance of the role of bats in nature. If you’re an avid Critter of the Week reader, you know that even the Critter Crew has a soft spot for these amazing creatures.

Often misunderstood and maligned as scary or aggressive, bats are peaceful, hardworking critters that bring incredible value to ecosystems and crops worldwide. Millions of them work hard every night to do things such as pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal, especially for some key crops for humans. It is estimated that just in the United States alone they provide over $80 billion of value in pest control services for agriculture—just think about how much bigger that number is when you’re talking about the whole world!

Here’s the inside scoop on the bin dig we did of CASA Kitchen’s compost! We’re excited to see how much material has been...
10/24/2023

Here’s the inside scoop on the bin dig we did of CASA Kitchen’s compost! We’re excited to see how much material has been diverted from landfills and instead will be recycled by nature ♻️

This  , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome t...
10/23/2023

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome they actually are! Demystification leads to understanding—and there are still plenty of spooky supernatural creatures to get your scare on with.

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Hoary Bat!

One of the Duke City’s most commonly spotted bats, the Hoary Bat is another of our expert pest controllers, preferring to dine on moths and mosquitoes. Hoary means grayish-white, and the Hoary Bat takes its name from its grayish-white fur mixed in throughout its body. They are one of the most widespread bat species in the world, native to most of North America and taking a yearly migratory trip to as far south as Guatemala.

On the larger side of our local bat species, the Hoary Bat weighs in at an average of 1 ounce in weight and 5” in length. They are typically solitary animals, seen only with others during mating season, and can fly up to 13 MPH during their yearly migration.

Your best bet to find one of these night fliers is while they nap from a tree branch during the day. They can be spotted throughout the city, but most often in places with lots of trees and not as much disturbance such as the bosque. Just look for a tan, black and grayish-white puffball a bit bigger than a golf ball hanging from a tree branch or clinging to a tree trunk!

Critter Safety Minute: If you see a sick or injured bat in the City of Albuquerque, do not touch it. Please call 311 for assistance.

Address

1 Civic Plz NW, Rm 3023
Albuquerque, NM
87102

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

Telephone

+15057682600

Website

https://linktr.ee/cabqehd

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