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City of Albuquerque Environmental Health Department

City of Albuquerque Environmental Health Department The mission of the Environmental Health Department is to responsively and professionally serve the p

Operating as usual

There is just one week left to provide feedback on energy efficiency programs! The survey only takes a few minutes and w...
10/24/2022

There is just one week left to provide feedback on energy efficiency programs! The survey only takes a few minutes and we greatly appreciate your feedback: https://zcu.io/9dqy

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome th...
10/24/2022

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome they actually are! Demystification leads to understanding—and there are still plenty of spooky supernatural creatures to get your scare on with.

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Common Raven!

Albuquerque is one of the many homes of the Common Raven, but unlike in the poem by Edgar Allen Poe of similar name, they will not be saying ‘nevermore’. These large, all black birds have an overall length of 20-25” and wingspan of approximately 4 feet. They are found worldwide in northern latitudes and throughout most of the western United States.

Ravens and other Corvids are highly intelligent birds, capable of using tools, figuring out logic puzzles, and imitating all sorts of artificial and natural sounds—even human speech and car alarms! They are very social birds, usually living in large groups and can even remember and differentiate between different humans and other animals… and will remember if they are treated badly and can hold a grudge for months. Due to their dark color, many have attributed bad omens and other negative connotations to this totally innocent bird.

Ravens have been spotted all over town, from the foothills to the valley. They are easy to pick out due to their all black color and size. If you see something that looks like crow but bigger, that’s a raven!

Today is !Reptiles are key critters in ecosystems worldwide, including Albuquerque. We see them regularly throughout the...
10/21/2022

Today is !

Reptiles are key critters in ecosystems worldwide, including Albuquerque. We see them regularly throughout the city, usually in the form of Whiptails and Fence Lizards scurrying by on the sidewalks and dirt paths.

Many reptiles (snakes and lizards, most specifically) are mesopredators, meaning that they are a middle portion of a food web that both preys on other animals and is prey for another predator. It’s a tough life, but an important job to have in terms of a healthy ecosystem.

We have 40+ native reptile species slithering, scurrying and lumbering throughout the Duke City on an average day. Next time you’re out and about, keep your eyes open for a reptile!

Calling all youth artists! Show us your favorite Albuquerque critters. Youth ages 18 & under can submit their local crit...
10/20/2022

Calling all youth artists! Show us your favorite Albuquerque critters. Youth ages 18 & under can submit their local critter art to [email protected] for their chance to win a t-shirt. Get inspired and learn more about Albuquerque’s critters at cabq.gov/critters.

Winners art may be used for future promotional items. Critter submissions must contain critters found in our urban wildlife (e.g. road runners, coyotes, rattlesnakes, hummingbirds) and excludes pets.

The Sustainability Office toured the state’s largest composting facility in New Mexico! We learned more about how the Wa...
10/18/2022

The Sustainability Office toured the state’s largest composting facility in New Mexico! We learned more about how the Water Authority repurposes waste to create Class A compost that is utilized for small (backyard) and large (roadside soil stabilization) projects.

10/18/2022

You’ve seen our posts & now we’re launching a youth art contest! 👩🏾‍🎨🧑‍🎨 Youth ages 18 & under can submit their local critter art to [email protected] for their chance to win a t-shirt. Get inspired and learn more about Albuquerque’s critters at cabq.gov/critters.

Winners art may be used for future promotional items. Critter submissions must contain critters found in our urban wildlife (e.g. road runners, coyotes, rattlesnakes, hummingbirds) and excludes pets.

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome th...
10/17/2022

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome they actually are! Demystification leads to understanding—and there are still plenty of spooky supernatural creatures to get your scare on with.

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Pallid Bat! 🦇

4-5” from snout to tail and a wingspan of 14-16”, this oft-maligned night flyer is one of our local pest control experts and one of our biggest local bat species. Pallid bats have yellowish brown to cream colored fur, large, 1” long ears, and a distinct piglike snout. Often found in arid and semi-arid habitats in Western North America, they are found in rocky grassland areas and usually have multiple roosts they hang out in.

Pallid bats have a unique hunting style and specialize on ground-living insects such as crickets, scorpions, centipedes, grasshoppers and others, swooping down for a meal and taking it back to its roost to dine. They can even eat up to half of their body weight in one night! Pallid bats have a special mutation that allows them to be immune to the effects of scorpion venom, allowing them to eat as many scorpions as they like. They have also been known to make the occasional snack of cactus nectar and fruits and act as a pollinator for cacti.

These peaceful pest control experts are seen more towards the Foothills and the Petroglyphs here in the Duke City, but will occasionally be spotted near the Rio.

Critter Safety Minute: If you encounter a , NEVER touch it with your bare hands. If you suspect the animal to be sick or injured, call 311 or your local animal control/welfare agency for assistance. If you suspect someone has been scratched or bitten by a bat, immediately contact the New Mexico Department of Health or your local health department for assistance and further instructions.

Join Bernalillo County tomorrow, Saturday October 15th from 10AM-noon to learn more about the world of jujubes and backy...
10/14/2022

Join Bernalillo County tomorrow, Saturday October 15th from 10AM-noon to learn more about the world of jujubes and backyard farming! Experience fall and harvest your own.

Congrats to Atrisco Heritage High School for their groundbreaking battery storage and solar project! We love to celebrat...
10/13/2022

Congrats to Atrisco Heritage High School for their groundbreaking battery storage and solar project! We love to celebrate these sustainability successes across our community.

10/13/2022

- if you have time, chop it up! Smaller pieces are easier to break down. Though you can add larger food scraps to your compost, spending a few more seconds in the preparation process will shorten the time between adding the items and having beautiful finished compost. For more composting tips, visit NMComposters.org.

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome th...
10/11/2022

This , the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome they actually are! Demystification leads to understanding—and there are still plenty of spooky supernatural creatures to get your scare on with.

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Texas Brown Tarantula!

The most common tarantula species spotted in the Duke City, the Texas Brown Tarantula is native to most of the southern United States. Generally dark brown in color, these arachnids can grow to exceed 4” in length and weigh over 3oz, although most you will see will be smaller than that. Females have been known to live for up to 40 years, but it is thought they can live even longer. Males are far more short lived, capable of living up to 10 years but often living less than one year after maturity in the wild.

Despite their appearance, they are docile and not aggressive, only acting in defense when provoked. Like all spiders, they use venom to catch and eat their prey, but the venom of the Texas Brown Tarantula is not toxic to humans. Tarantulas are natural pest control experts that eat ground dwelling bugs like cockroaches, ants and other bugs.

Mostly found in the foothills and mesalands, don’t panic if you come across one of these gentle giants when you’re out for a stroll. Instead, stop and take a look!

The  as seen from the Los Angeles Landfill! Our team maintains the landfill year-round, which becomes the perfect ground...
10/07/2022

The as seen from the Los Angeles Landfill! Our team maintains the landfill year-round, which becomes the perfect grounds to host RVs during the Balloon Fiesta. 🎈

It's that time of year 🔥🌶️ Keep food safety in mind - let your chile cool before freezing. If you freeze chile while it'...
10/07/2022

It's that time of year 🔥🌶️ Keep food safety in mind - let your chile cool before freezing. If you freeze chile while it's still warm bacteria may grow and become dormant during storage.

Today we celebrated ! Smarter energy use means making improvements to use less energy overall.  Albuquerque is paving th...
10/05/2022

Today we celebrated ! Smarter energy use means making improvements to use less energy overall. Albuquerque is paving the way for an energy efficient future which brings both cost savings to taxpayers and community alike, while keeping our carbon footprint low.

Join us tomorrow to celebrate Energy Efficiency Day! Energy efficiency betters our health and creates more equitable com...
10/04/2022

Join us tomorrow to celebrate Energy Efficiency Day! Energy efficiency betters our health and creates more equitable communities.
WHEN: Tomorrow, Oct. 5 at 10:30AM
WHERE: North Domingo Baca Multigenerational Center

 is here and the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awes...
10/03/2022

is here and the Critter Crew is bringing you some of our most misunderstood ‘spooky’ creatures and showing you how awesome they actually are! Demystification leads to understanding—and there are still plenty of spooky supernatural creatures to get your scare on with.

This week’s not-actually-spooky is the Turkey Vulture!

Often maligned for its looks only a mother could love, these massive birds are actually nature’s cleanup crew! Recognized by their size and bright red bare heads, Turkey Vultures are bald so that their meal of carrion (dead and rotting animals) doesn’t stick to them and keeps them cleaner. Their name means ‘cleansing breeze’, both a nod to their ability to help clean up the landscape and their ability to seemingly float for hours on updrafts without ever flapping their wings.

Turkey Vultures are large birds, tipping the scales at 2-5 lbs and a 4-6’ wingspan. They can float in the air for hours at a time on thermal updrafts and have been reported by airplane pilots at 20,000ft in altitude. The only scavenger bird that cannot kill its own prey, their feet resemble a chicken’s rather than an eagle’s. They prefer freshly deceased animals, generally consuming things that have been dead for less than 48 hours, and can smell a meal from over a mile away. Not only do they eat carrion, they also relieve themselves on their feet to cool off in hot weather—making them not the most pleasant smelling animals in the animal kingdom.

Although a classic spooky creature, Turkey Vultures are not to be feared for anything beyond their smell. Definitely stinky, but not spooky. Turkey Vultures are a summer migrant here in the Duke City and will be leaving us this month to complete their yearly migration to South America and the Caribbean. They have been spotted all around town, but most often in the valley near the Rio. If you don’t see them riding the thermal currents around town this year, start looking for them to return in March of next year!

The month of October is Bat Appreciation Month! 🦇 Often associated with ‘Spooky Season’ in the United States and beyond,...
10/01/2022

The month of October is Bat Appreciation Month! 🦇 Often associated with ‘Spooky Season’ in the United States and beyond, bats are actually key critters in ecosystems worldwide. They work every night to do things such as pest control, pollination, and seed dispersal, especially for some key crops for humans.

🦇 Love your chocolate? Thank bats, who are key to the dispersal of seeds and protection of crop yields.
🦇 Tequila drinker? Bats are the sole pollinators for the blue agave plant.
🦇 All of the bats you will find around Albuquerque are pest control masters—including eating some of the mosquitoes that have been bugging us all summer.

Let’s hear it for the bats! 👏

If you see a sick or injured bat in the City of Albuquerque, do not touch it. Please call 311 for assistance.

Did you miss our community engagement meeting? Not to worry! You can watch the recording and complete the survey, which ...
09/30/2022

Did you miss our community engagement meeting? Not to worry! You can watch the recording and complete the survey, which will be open through the end of October. We appreciate your feedback! https://zcu.io/vcjn

It's almost that magical time of year in ABQ,  officially kicks off tomorrow! Did you know that our Environmental Servic...
09/30/2022

It's almost that magical time of year in ABQ, officially kicks off tomorrow! Did you know that our Environmental Services Division who maintains the Los Angeles Landfill opens the landfill for RV parking? It's the perfect spot to watch our favorite event! 🎈

Reminder! Join us for tomorrow’s energy efficiency meeting (September 28 at 5:00 pm) and help guide the City’s sustainab...
09/27/2022

Reminder! Join us for tomorrow’s energy efficiency meeting (September 28 at 5:00 pm) and help guide the City’s sustainability related programs and initiatives. https://zcu.io/9fKG

It's World Environmental Health Day! Today and every day, our department is dedicated to promoting and protecting the he...
09/26/2022

It's World Environmental Health Day! Today and every day, our department is dedicated to promoting and protecting the health of our environment for a more sustainable future.

This week’s  is the Western Pygmy Blue butterfly!One of the smallest species in the world and the smallest in North Amer...
09/26/2022

This week’s is the Western Pygmy Blue butterfly!

One of the smallest species in the world and the smallest in North America, this desert dweller is native to the Southwestern United States. Western Pygmy Blues are not actually blue, and instead are mostly greyish and copper in color. Western Pygmy Blues can be identified by their wingspan of only ¾” (20mm) and its fringed, white, grey, copper and black wings. Adults feed solely on the nectar of plants, while their larvae prefer to munch on all parts of plants such as saltbush and chenopods—plants we see commonly throughout the city, especially in open space areas.

The Western Pygmy Blue can still be spotted fluttering around town right now, although we are nearing the end of its season in our part of its range. If you miss them this year, never fear—they are common throughout the city and will return next year!

Take action during ! Mark your calendar: Wednesday, September 28 at 5:00 pm is a virtual community engagement meeting. Y...
09/23/2022

Take action during ! Mark your calendar: Wednesday, September 28 at 5:00 pm is a virtual community engagement meeting. You will hear updates and be able to share your perspective and ideas to inform current and future projects. https://zcu.io/NVw3

09/22/2022

Summers are getting hotter and we’re looking into ways to keep our city cool. For this , pledge to plant a tree to do your part to combat climate change!

September is National Food Safety Education Month! Avoid foodborne illnesses with these tips:🍖Cook raw meats thoroughly🥝...
09/21/2022

September is National Food Safety Education Month! Avoid foodborne illnesses with these tips:
🍖Cook raw meats thoroughly
🥝Wash fruits and vegetables
↔️ Keep raw meats away from produce, cooked foods, and foods that are ready to eat
...and more!

09/20/2022

It’s ! Have you seen our latest climate action plan implementation report? Learn more about what the City is doing to combat at cabq.gov/sustainability

This week’s  is the White-tailed Antelope Squirrel!Often mistaken for a Chipmunk, this small rodent is actually a type o...
09/19/2022

This week’s is the White-tailed Antelope Squirrel!

Often mistaken for a Chipmunk, this small rodent is actually a type of ground squirrel. While these cousins do share a small stature, some of the same striping and a propensity for looking cute, they are distinctly different animals. White-tailed Antelope Squirrels tip the scales at a whopping 3-5 oz (85-150g) and 7-9” (19-23cm) length, and a tail approximately 1/3 of that size that curls up along their backs. White-tailed Antelope Squirrels are ominvores who will eat everything from vegetation to small lizards, and are some of the most common prey for snakes, hawks, owls, coyote, fox and other animals that prefer to snack on small rodents.

This small critter can be found throughout the southwestern United States in desert environments ranging from southern Oregon to New Mexico. In Albuquerque they can be spotted almost exclusively on the Westside, especially closer to places like Petroglyph National Monument, Piedras Marcadas Canyon and the West Mesa. Remember to always enjoy wildlife from a distance-- no matter how cute they are!

What do you think about energy efficiency? Join us Wednesday, September 28 at 5:00 pm to hear updates and share your per...
09/16/2022

What do you think about energy efficiency? Join us Wednesday, September 28 at 5:00 pm to hear updates and share your perspective and ideas, to inform current and future projects. https://zcu.io/Gzo9

Need a place to cool off? Beat the heat this summer and stop by one of the City's cooling centers. Each center offers a ...
09/15/2022

Need a place to cool off? Beat the heat this summer and stop by one of the City's cooling centers. Each center offers a place to cool off and get water and sunscreen!

Everyone plays a role in preventing mosquitoes - be sure to check around your yard today for any sources of standing wat...
09/14/2022

Everyone plays a role in preventing mosquitoes - be sure to check around your yard today for any sources of standing water after last night's rain. Mosquitoes can breed in water sources as small as a bottle cap. Learn more about mosquito prevention: https://zcu.io/qpLK

Address

1 Civic Plz NW, Rm 3023
Albuquerque, NM
87102

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

Telephone

+15057682600

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Happening tomorrow! Free COVID-19 and flu shot clinics with ABQ Department of Senior Affairs.

No appointment needed, available for all eligible ages for flu and COVID vaccines. Remember to wear a short sleeved shirt and a mask.

➡️ North Domingo Baca Multi-Gen Center, 9am-12pm
➡️ Highland Senior Center, 1pm-4pm
Ceiling fans typically rotate counterclockwise, pushing air down & producing a slight wind chill effect, allowing you to feel cooler. Turn the ceiling fan reverse switch clockwise in winter, which will produce an updraft & move the warm air that collects near your ceiling down into the rest of the rooms in your business.
Our is the Red-eared Slider!🐢

Named for the red patch on each side of the head where an ear would be, the Red-eared Slider can often be found swimming around or sitting on a log in places like Tingley Beach and the UNM Duckpond. You can also tell them apart from other species of turtles by the yellow stripes on their face, legs and tail. These poikilotherms, aka cold-blooded animals, are dependent on the temperature around them so they can often be seen basking in the sun on warm winter days to boost their metabolism, as they start to brumate (a type of energy conservation) at around 50F.

Red-eared Sliders are native to the Southeastern US and invasive here in New Mexico, and are now considered one of the worst invasive species worldwide. They arrived here in the pet trade, and have taken over our waterways because of irresponsible owners who released their animals when they did not want them anymore. Please do not dump unwanted animals! Contact CABQ Animal Welfare or a specialty rescue group instead.
Making holiday cookies?🍪 Fully bake your dough and batter before eating for a safe and happy holiday!
Last minute gift wrapping? Choice a sustainable option and use items you already have to wrap gifts this year! We used our favorite balloon fiesta calendar 🎈📆




When it comes to climate change, water and energy are intimately connected. Using more water directly impacts energy usage as water utilities are some of the biggest users of electricity. Using more energy means that traditional sources of energy such as coal and gas are using more water. Watering the appropriate amount for the season is important.
Learn more: https://www.505outside.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/WBTS-_all4_Final_OL_for-PRINT_7_5-x-6.pdf
‘Tis the season to keep sustainability in mind! 🎁🎄 You can wrap gifts with items you already have at home instead of using wrapping paper. What other unique gift wrapping ideas have you used?
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Keep the heat in by sealing leaky doors and windows. There are many ways to seal up leaks:
➡️ Install door sweeps and weatherstripping such as foam tape to close up gaps beneath doors and throughout window frames.
➡️ Use caulk to close up small air leaks in the exterior of your building.
➡️ Use spray insulation to seal larger air leaks in building.

Learn more:https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/guide_to_air_sealing.pdf
Need a sustainable gift idea? Buy tickets to a local event or gift baked goods (bonus points if you thrift a casserole dish to gift it in!) ♻️

This week’s is the Mule Deer!🦌🎅🏼🎄

Some people will talk excitedly about the arrival of Santa and his reindeer this week, but reindeer aren’t a normal inhabitant of Albuquerque. We do, however, have Rudolph’s cousin close to home—the Mule Deer! Mule deer and Reindeer are both in the Subfamily Capreolinae, or the New World Deer. While reindeer are strictly cold weather, sub-arctic and boreal animals, the Mule Deer makes western North America home, including here in Albuquerque. Easily identified by their large, mule-like ears, adults stand around 3’ tall at the shoulder. They are speedy animals, who can move at up to 45 mph for short bursts of time.

While Mule Deer mostly inhabit the Sandias, they will occasionally take a stroll down to town, especially in the Foothills and NE Heights. Most people are surprised to see deer in the city, but they often come through in search of a snack out of people’s gardens or off their fruit trees, given that they are selective eaters—meaning that they eat plants and plant parts that are more likely to have more nutrients in them. Remember, always enjoy wildlife from a distance. 😊

Taking easy & affordable steps like replacing air filters and having regular tune ups of heating & cooling systems will not only save your business energy, but also provide cleaner air and uncover any problems that could be expensive or dangerous, potentially impacting your employees’ health. Set up a schedule to regularly replace filters (approximately every 3 months) and contact your HVAC rep annually for an inspection.
Shoutout to the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls group who raised $900 to pay for the trees they planted in City View Park! 🌲🌳🌱

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Other Government Organizations in Albuquerque (show all)

Albuquerque Public Art Bernalillo County Sheriff's Office City of Albuquerque - Office of Equity & Inclusion New Mexico Commission for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Metropolitan Courthouse New Mexico Developmental Disabilities Council Bernalillo County Parks, Recreation and Open Space ABQ Department of Senior Affairs Office of Black Community Engagement City of Albuquerque Parks and Recreation New Mexico EPSCoR NMSU Bernalillo County 4-H NM Alliance for Retired Americans Condado de Bernalillo (Nuevo Mexico) Marine Corps League "Jerry Murphy" Detachment 381