New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office Communicating the latest information on activities of the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office. Located in Albuquerque, the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office conducts conservation activities throughout New Mexico and adjacent states.

Major activity areas include: endangered species monitoring, endangered species augmentation evaluation, and nonnative species control in the San Juan River Basin; monitoring, rescue, salvage, augmentation coordination, and tagging of endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow in the Middle Rio Grande Basin; fish community monitoring in the Pecos and Canadian River Basins; recovery actions for Gila Trout and other listed aquatic species in the Gila River Basin; technical assistance to Tribes and Pueblos in all aspects of aquatic conservation (recreational fishing, surveying and monitoring, endangered species recovery, development of management plans, habitat restoration); aquatic conservation outreach and education; and restoration and improvement of fish passage and fish habitat. For official information about New Mexico Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office, go to http://www.fws.gov/southwest/fisheries/nmfwco/index.html/. For more about the Fish and Wildlife service, go to www.fws.gov

Mission: Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Operating as usual

Who needs a spa when you can have all-natural mud baths during fish rescue?  Some re-wetting, followed by some re-drying...
08/10/2020

Who needs a spa when you can have all-natural mud baths during fish rescue? Some re-wetting, followed by some re-drying, made for some mucky conditions on the Rio Grande. Fish rescue crews still getting it done for the Rio Grande silvery minnow.
USFWS Fisheries & U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region

#ThrowbackThursday – Back in 2014, our office was participating in the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society’s Youth...
08/06/2020

#ThrowbackThursday – Back in 2014, our office was participating in the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society’s Youth Education Seminar. The seminar was held during their Southwest Regional Conference. Six youth from surrounding Pueblos participated in the field day. Our crew demonstrated various fish sampling techniques using gill nets, hoop nets and electrofishing along with how to collect macroinvertabrates and water quality samples. Sparking the next generation of biologists.

08/05/2020
Pecos Larval Fishes

#WonderWednesday Have you ever come across an egg and wondered what it will be when it hatches? We wonder that, too! Our biologists are working on a larval fish study this summer out on the Pecos River. They wonder what fish are laying eggs during large reservoir releases. The egg and larval stage can be a challenging time to identify a fish to its species. One biologist brought in a few eggs to hatch and raise so they can watch them develop in one of our glass aquariums. This group of young fish swimming around in the video were brought in as eggs at the same time. They are already separating out in the tank; some are staying low in the tank and others are hanging out near the surface of the water. What other differences can you see in these little fish?

Video Credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS (no sound)

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder how fish feel vibrations or movement of prey and predators in the water? Wonder no more. Th...
07/29/2020

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder how fish feel vibrations or movement of prey and predators in the water? Wonder no more. The answer to your question is lateral lines. Lateral lines are sensory organs found in fish and other aquatic invertebrates. Lateral lines are a series of receptors in or just under the skin that line the head and run the length of the body of a fish. In the posted photo the arrow points to the lateral line of four different fish.

Photos and collages credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Kudos to the National Fish Hatcheries this #FishFriday!
07/24/2020
Despite Pandemic, National Fish Hatcheries Get the Job Done

Kudos to the National Fish Hatcheries this #FishFriday!

As the country begins to reopen, responsible outdoor recreation is needed to support our nation’s social and economic recoveries. Fishing is one activity that may be enjoyed alone or with others while keeping a responsible social distance apart. It also supports local businesses such as tackle sho...

Mission: Fish Rescue.  Move target to flowing water.  Reduce risk of loss.Target species: Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (end...
07/22/2020

Mission: Fish Rescue. Move target to flowing water. Reduce risk of loss.

Target species: Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (endangered).

Mission will be mentally and physical challenging. It will include hot days, wet clothes, sand traps, isolated pools, warm water, occasional stench, and non-targets vying for your help.

Mission accepted: Thomas Archdeacon, Tanner Germany, Kacie Coffey, Abe Anderson, and Lyle Thomas worked on the Rio Grande near San Marcial, south of Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. The crew moved swiftly to move their target to flowing stretches of the Rio Grande.

Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios, was out lending a hand to the Pueblo of Santa Ana Department of Natural Resources.  The...
07/21/2020

Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios, was out lending a hand to the Pueblo of Santa Ana Department of Natural Resources.

They made sure she didn't get carried away by some of those deep, fast flows of the Rio Grande. Yes, despite the low flows, there are still a few sections of river that can be a little treacherous. Always a pleasure working with this crew.

The Pueblo, with help from the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, has once again completed its summer fish community monitoring. It seems that every year is unique, but this year was especially unusual, both for fish and people. With PPE and social distancing measures in place, the team went into the river properly spaced apart and protected. We caught fish in almost each of the 120 seine hauls. Most were common, like red shiners and white suckers, but some were more rare this year including the Rio Grande silvery minnow. We caught large fish, such as catfish, that we usually catch as small fish and small fish, like small and large mouth bass, that we usually catch as larger fish. We had a very productive monitoring event and couldn’t have done it without the assistance from the folks at New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office.

As Field Biologists we get the pleasure of traveling the state and seeing some beautiful scenery.  Last week, Bobby Dura...
07/20/2020

As Field Biologists we get the pleasure of traveling the state and seeing some beautiful scenery. Last week, Bobby Duran helped New Mexico Department of Game and Fish with Gila Trout surveys in Mineral Creek, Gila National Forest, New Mexico.

The crew set out to see if stockings from 2016 to 2018 were a success. They completed electrofishing surveys to figure out if the stocked Gila Trout were reproducing and moving along the length of Mineral Creek. They sampled lower, middle and upper Mineral Creek and found good numbers of young-of-year, juvenile and adult Gila Trout in all sections.

Check out their field office for the week.

07/17/2020

#FISHFRIDAY Pectoral fin with rounded tip or sickle shaped tip? Scales the same size from head to tail or smaller scales closer to head than tail? Barbel absent or present? Just a few choices that fish biologists run through as we work to identify a fish.

With a quick look, the two species below are commonly mistaken for the other. The endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow and the Flathead Chub. Both fish are native to the Rio Grande. Which one is the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (ovate, uniform scale size, barbel absent)?

USFWS Fisheries

A fun share for today coming from USFWS Fisheries and Habitat.  Fancy science words or not, all these little features co...
07/16/2020

A fun share for today coming from USFWS Fisheries and Habitat. Fancy science words or not, all these little features come together to create some pretty cool fish species. #UnscienceAnAnimal

If you're fishing for fancy flaps this summer, be sure to aim for the dainty boop/catchy hole #unscienceananimal 📷 USFWS/Ryan Hagerty

This week, Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios was totally geeking out at the idea of catching a Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter co...
07/15/2020

This week, Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios was totally geeking out at the idea of catching a Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii). She was able to tag along with Biologists, Kristin Madden (Deputy Chief) and Brian Millsap (National Raptor Coordinator) from our Service's Migratory Birds. They were on the lookout for urban Cooper's Hawks to band for their study. Within 30 minutes, they had an Accipiter in hand.

USFWS Migratory Birds, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region, & USFWS Fisheries

A beautiful find by our Rio Grande Crew while out on Fish Rescue. This Blue Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) is native to th...
07/11/2020

A beautiful find by our Rio Grande Crew while out on Fish Rescue. This Blue Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) is native to the Rio Grande and is displaying a piebald pattern. Piebald is simply an animal with a pattern of two different colors, especially black and white.

USFWS Fisheries & U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region

07/10/2020
Captive Roundnose Minnow (Dionda episcopa)

#FishFriday This Fish Friday comes from our office. We were delighted to find a 2nd generation of Roundnose Minnows. These two little ones were likely hatched just as many in our office were shifting to telework.

This video is of the captive Roundnose Minnow (Dionda episcopa) swimming in our front office aquarium. The adult minnows were collected during a field study in 2015 near Santa Rosa, New Mexico. These fish are native to New Mexico. There is no sound.

Video Credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

#ThrowbackThursday In July 2017, Thomas Archdeacon and the Rio Grande Crew were out rescuing the endangered Rio Grande S...
07/09/2020

#ThrowbackThursday In July 2017, Thomas Archdeacon and the Rio Grande Crew were out rescuing the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow (RGSM). In most years, sections of the Rio Grande dry during irrigation season, which lasts from June through October. The crew rescued RGSM from isolated pools using seines and UTVs. The fish rescue crew located a series of pools about one mile long connected to each other by a thin continuous flow from overbank seepage. Within this isolated section, thousands of RGSM were observed swimming between pools. The crew estimated that 50,000 RGSM were rescued and moved to continuous sections of the Rio Grande. That total is greater than the sum of all other years of RGSM fish rescue combined.

Fish Rescue has become yearly occurrence and the crews are back at it, rescuing any RGSM they come across. It has been 12 years since the Rio Grande flowed continuously, last giving the crew a break in 2008.

#WonderWednesday Tattoos...do you ever wonder what fish would look like with a tattoo?  These aren't as fancy as most ta...
07/08/2020

#WonderWednesday Tattoos...do you ever wonder what fish would look like with a tattoo?

These aren't as fancy as most tattoos, but here are a couple of Red Shiners sporting VIE tags (visible implant elastomer). Pretty close to a tattoo. Fish biologists use VIE to mark fish for studies or to identify hatchery reared fish.

#FishFriday  For today's fish Friday, we head to the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico.  Fish Biologists, Weston and Ang...
07/03/2020

#FishFriday For today's fish Friday, we head to the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico. Fish Biologists, Weston and Angela, were out sampling for larval fish along the Pecos River. Check out some of their catch. These ones are the juveniles and a few adults. The truly larval fish were too tiny to photograph (for our camera).

Rio Grande crew out on the Rio Grande near San Marcial, New Mexico (June 22, 2020). The crew expect to be out on this se...
06/29/2020

Rio Grande crew out on the Rio Grande near San Marcial, New Mexico (June 22, 2020).

The crew expect to be out on this section of the Rio Grande soon for fish rescue of the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow as the river continues to dry.

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Smoke in the air, 100 degree temps, burnt out salt cedar stands, no problem.  Rio Grande crew still getting out and gett...
06/26/2020

Smoke in the air, 100 degree temps, burnt out salt cedar stands, no problem. Rio Grande crew still getting out and getting the job done.

Our crew is constantly learning something new through field studies, field surveys, or coursework. And when it comes to ...
06/25/2020

Our crew is constantly learning something new through field studies, field surveys, or coursework. And when it comes to learning, a great instructor can make all the difference.

A big congratulations goes out to this electrifying National Conservation Training Center Instructor, Dr. Alan Temple! He is this year's recipient of the Fisheries Management Section Award of Excellence from The American Fisheries Society (AFS).

Congratulations to NCTC’s very own Dr. Alan Temple as the recipient of this year’s Fisheries Management Section Award of Excellence from The American Fisheries Society (AFS). Alan received this award for his achievements in training, international consulting in fisheries sampling, and a 31-year career of helping others solve their fisheries management challenges.

“Alan always takes time to discuss new techniques, courses he wants to develop or a technique needing a new approach, Alan is happiest when engaging with his colleagues in hopes of making something better. An optimist at heart, Alan’s sound advice and down-to-earth Kentucky wisdom keep us all grounded and moving in the right direction.”

Credits: Jarrod McPherson/USFWS and Colton Perna/USFWS

@WorksheetWednesday (limited edition)  Color-by-number the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Logo as you learn a little abo...
06/24/2020

@WorksheetWednesday (limited edition) Color-by-number the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Logo as you learn a little about our agency and office.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office is a fisheries field office of the Service located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. We do a variety of activities including threatened and endangered fish monitoring, fish rescue, fish stocking, aquatic invasive species management, Tribal fisheries management assistance, and outreach.

Click on image, select options, download, and enjoy.

The field work continues! Whether it is completing fish rescue for the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow or gathering data for a...
06/19/2020

The field work continues! Whether it is completing fish rescue for the Rio Grande Silvery Minnow or gathering data for a field study, the Rio Grande crew is hard at work out on the Rio Grande, New Mexico.

#RioGrande, #RioGrandeSilveryMinnow, #NativeFish

06/18/2020
National Conservation Training Center

Electrofishing is a common tool used by Fish Biologists and our office. Want to know how it works? Join in on Conservation Connect Live.

Live now...Conservation Connect featuring Electrofishing!

Learn about the technology biologists use to catch fish. Dr. Alan Temple will be discussing the interaction between electricity and fish!

Nature Niños New Mexico (NMWF) & U.S. Forest Service ( Rocky Mountain Research Station) are hosting Conservation Career ...
06/18/2020

Nature Niños New Mexico (NMWF) & U.S. Forest Service ( Rocky Mountain Research Station) are hosting Conservation Career Week on Zoom. Come meet 10 of the coolest conservationist in New Mexico and learn about their captivating careers! Two conservationists will be introduced each day. They'll share about their career path and then allow for questions and answers. ALL AGES WELCOME!

The event will run daily, June 22 - 26, 2020 from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. (MDT).

Our Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios, is part of the line up and will be on June 24th at 9:30 a.m.

Hop on over to www.natureninos.org to register!

06/18/2020
National Conservation Training Center

Electrofishing is a commonly used technique for many Fish biologists, including those at our office. Experience the high-voltage excitement of "Electrofishing" with Dr. Alan Temple - the Johnny Appleseed of fish sampling. The crew from Conservation Connect Live (NCTC) will explore electricity, fish biology and real-world math as they get "amped up" over fisheries science!

This Thursday, June 18th at 1:00 p.m. (EDT) on the NCTC page: https://www.facebook.com/USFWSNCTC/

P.S. That is 11:00 a.m. for New Mexico viewers!

The National Conservation Training Center is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and a leader in environmental sustainability.

06/14/2020
Our Land

A drying river, a fish in trouble, hear their story. Fish Biologist, Thomas Archdeacon (our lead biologist for work on the Rio Grande), speaks with Correspondent, Laura Paskus, during this month’s episode of Our Land: New Mexico's Past, Present, and Future.

USFWS Fisheries & U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region

June 12, 2020 – On this month’s episode of Our Land, we visit the dry bed of the Rio Grande south of Socorro, New Mexico, and also talk with biologist Thomas Archdeacon about why the drying occurs, how it affects endangered fish, and why this year’s recovery of rare silvery minnows was complicated by COVID-19. New Mexico’s largest river has consistently dried in this stretch over the past two decades, and as the region continues warming, that will continue to occur. This year, the mountains that supply the Rio Grande saw near-normal snowpack for most of the winter, and yet drying still began in late May. And, as Archdeacon points out, even in years like 2019 which saw record high runoff, the river dried in the fall.

#ThrowbackThursday Racing Against Fire and Rain Continues...In May 2012, lighting strikes started two wildfires that wou...
06/11/2020

#ThrowbackThursday Racing Against Fire and Rain Continues...

In May 2012, lighting strikes started two wildfires that would ultimately merge and go down in the history books as the largest wildlife in New Mexico history. By July 31st, when the Whitewater Baldy Complex fire was declared out, it had burned 297,845 acres of the Gila National Forest, New Mexico.

In June 2012, when fire crews gave the all clear, multi-agency crews jumped into action. The crews, made up of staff from New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Forest, NM Game and Fish, and Southwestern Native Aquatic Resource and Recovery Center (ARRC), worked quickly to evacuate Spikedace, Loach Minnow, and Gila Chub (now known as Roundtail Chub). Spikedace and Loach Minnow were collected from the West Fork Gila River. Gila Chub were collected from Upper and Lower Turkey Creek. These fish were held at Southwestern Native ARRC as a refuge population for these endangered species.

#NativeFish, #Conservation,

We may think highly of our fish, but that doesn’t mean our feathered friends can’t bring a smile to our face, too.  Shar...
06/10/2020

We may think highly of our fish, but that doesn’t mean our feathered friends can’t bring a smile to our face, too. Sharing a winning caption call from a sister Refuge in Maryland.

"Stop laughing at my hair ...all the salons are closed.” Submitted by Po Ross

Photo credit: Charlie Lister/USFWS

"Stop laughing at my hair ...all the salons are closed!" Congrats to Po Ross for captioning these red-breasted mergansers at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland http://ow.ly/H5zs50A474q. Thanks, all, for adding laughter to our day! (Photo: Charlie Lister/USFWS)

Haven't had the chance to join in on National Fishing & Boating Week, but need to satisfy that urge to do something fish...
06/10/2020
Angler Academy for Kids

Haven't had the chance to join in on National Fishing & Boating Week, but need to satisfy that urge to do something fishy. Check out Angler Academy! Bring the outdoors indoors with these entertaining activities.

#TakeMeFishing, #TheWaterisOpen, #NationalFishingAndBoatingWeek

Fishing games and handcrafts materials your kids can enjoy while learning from home. Check out kids activities ideas here

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3800 Commons Ave NE
Albuquerque, NM
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    Comments

    Let’s do this!!! Please sign and share!!!
    Do you have a picture of the world record Longear Sunfish that was caught on Elephant Butte Lake in 1985 by Patricia Stout? I would like to see it if you do. Thank you.
    Who is responsible for making the stupid decision for having a control burn in the Colin Neblett Wildlife area during a COUNTY WIDE BURN BAN and During 30 mph sustained winds!!! ??? Who ever made this ingenious decision should be sent to JAIL!!!