New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office

New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office Communicating the latest information on activities of the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office. Located in Albuquerque, the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office conducts conservation activities throughout New Mexico and adjacent states.
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Major activity areas include: endangered species monitoring, endangered species augmentation evaluation, and nonnative species control in the San Juan River Basin; monitoring, rescue, salvage, augmentation coordination, and tagging of endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow in the Middle Rio Grande Basin; fish community monitoring in the Pecos and Canadian River Basins; recovery actions for Gila Trout and other listed aquatic species in the Gila River Basin; technical assistance to Tribes and Pueblos in all aspects of aquatic conservation (recreational fishing, surveying and monitoring, endangered species recovery, development of management plans, habitat restoration); aquatic conservation outreach and education; and restoration and improvement of fish passage and fish habitat. For official information about New Mexico Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office, go to http://www.fws.gov/southwest/fisheries/nmfwco/index.html/. For more about the Fish and Wildlife service, go to www.fws.gov

Mission: Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Operating as usual

12/25/2020
12 Days of Fishmas

12 Day of Fishmas to celebrate our New Mexico Native Fishes! Merry Fishmas from the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office! This video features 12 of our native fish: Colorado pikeminnow, Gila trout, flathead catfish, bluegill, Pecos bluntnose shiner, roundtail chub, Mexican tetra, greenthroat darter, longnose dace, Pecos pupfish, mottled sculpin, and Rio Grande silvery minnow.

Check out interviews of a handful of aquatic macroinvertebrates preparing for winter.
12/24/2020
What Happens to Stream Life When the Temperatures Drop?

Check out interviews of a handful of aquatic macroinvertebrates preparing for winter.

Read about clean water, agriculture, fun activities for nature-loving families, and more topics related to protecting America’s outdoors.

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder what the view would be like while packing into a backcountry stream in the Gila National Fo...
12/23/2020

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder what the view would be like while packing into a backcountry stream in the Gila National Forest on a horse? Check out this view from one of our biologists from 2018. Crews routinely pack in on mules and horses to various streams across Gila National Forest and wilderness.

Photo credit: NMFWCO/USFWS

It all started with a history-making fire in 2012, the Whitewater-Baldy Complex Fire. Our field biologists racking up th...
12/22/2020
Gila Trout Return to Whitewater Creek - New Mexico Wildlife magazine

It all started with a history-making fire in 2012, the Whitewater-Baldy Complex Fire. Our field biologists racking up the miles and blisters alongside NM Game and Fish, U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Forest, and Mora National Fish Hatchery, and numerous volunteers.

A trout stocking took place in Whitewater Creek in early August, but that sounds far too simple for the efforts culminating that day. For starters, the trek into Whitewater Creek is not an easy one. The team hiked for over four hours, with the wind blowing around a steep canyon as they slowly descen...

12/19/2020
Longnose Dace

#FishFriday is brought to you by our gravel loving longnose dace of the Rio Grande. The flathead chub (the silvery ones) decided they wanted in on the fun, too, just to keep you on your fins. Both species prefer fast water but the dace also like the gravel mixed in with it. Put fast water together with gravel and you get the perfect riffle for these dace.

Video credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder what your view would be while standing in the middle of the Pecos River. Well, thanks to ou...
12/16/2020

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder what your view would be while standing in the middle of the Pecos River. Well, thanks to our Bio Tech, Lyle Thomas, here's a great view. Lyle captured this photo during Pecos fish monitoring in October 2020.

Photo credit: Lyle Thomas/USFWS

Sharing a tidbit about wetlands all the way from Philadelphia.  Not only do wetlands act as a sponge, but they are great...
12/15/2020

Sharing a tidbit about wetlands all the way from Philadelphia. Not only do wetlands act as a sponge, but they are great filters cycling nutrients and reducing sediments. P.S. We’ll gladly take the rain!

Rain, rain, go away!💧💧💧 #Didyouknow that wetlands act like a sponge and store up lots of rain and surface water? This stored water will then be slowly released back into the watershed, which is why wetlands are so important in preventing or relieving floods! A one acre wetland, one foot deep, can hold approximately 330,000 gallons of water! 💧💧💧

Photo: Tree outlines are shrouded on a foggy December day.
Lamar Gore/USFWS

#MinnowMonday has us facing off with a Rio Grande silvery minnow.  Even the silvery minnow is ready for this manic Monda...
12/14/2020

#MinnowMonday has us facing off with a Rio Grande silvery minnow. Even the silvery minnow is ready for this manic Monday to pass.

#FishFriday  Meet the western mosquitofish.  This pair are full grown, yes, you read correctly, full grown.  The female ...
12/11/2020

#FishFriday Meet the western mosquitofish. This pair are full grown, yes, you read correctly, full grown. The female can average up to 2 inches long and the male will only reach about 1 inch long. In this species the female not only carries the eggs, but she carries them until they hatch inside her; she is live-bearing. When she releases the young, they are fully developed and ready to go. And don’t let their small size fool you, they can easily be considered carnivores, but likely more omnivorous. They feed on insects, fish fry, and even their own young, topped off with a smidge of algae. They have such a good appetite that they have been introduced around the world to help combat mosquito borne diseases, since they readily feed on mosquito larvae. But luckily for us, we don’t need any introductions, western mosquitofish are native to the Rio Grande.

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Wow...check out the Alligator Snapping Turtle!  The FWCO office in Oklahoma along with Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery...
12/08/2020

Wow...check out the Alligator Snapping Turtle! The FWCO office in Oklahoma along with Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery get the pleasure of working hands on with these impressive turtles.

#mondaymood
Are you wishing you could be tucked in like this big girl this Monday morning?
Alligator Snapping Turtles are notoriously secretive and prefer to be hidden under submerged structure on river bottoms. Unlike Common Snapping Turtles that are often seen traveling between wetlands and crossing roads, Alligator Snapping Turtles typically only leave the water to nest. Factoring in their relatively low abundances throughout the Mississippi River drainage, an encounter with this species could be considered a rare and special experience.

#FishFriday  Did you know fathead minnow males develop breeding tubercles. At the same time, the males turn darker than ...
12/05/2020

#FishFriday Did you know fathead minnow males develop breeding tubercles. At the same time, the males turn darker than the females. Check out this pair of fathead minnow. These little minnows are native to the central and eastern portion of New Mexico in the Rio Grande, Pecos, and Canadian rivers.

West Fork Gila River, U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Forest.  Look at all that great habitat!  Gravel bottom stream...
12/04/2020

West Fork Gila River, U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Forest. Look at all that great habitat! Gravel bottom stream beds provide shelter for fish and other aquatic species like snakes, frogs, and macroinvertebrates. Food is found among this gravel for all the same creatures whether they are feeding upon each other or picking through the aquatic plants growing on and among rocks.

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

12/02/2020
Gila trout from Mora National Fish Hatchery

#WonderWednesday Have you ever wondered what the inside of a hatchery tank would look like? Have you ever wondered what a few hundred Gila trout would look like. Well, today we'll show you both. A visit to Mora National Fish Hatchery brings us this exclusive coverage of the threatened Gila trout in a circular tank. These particular trout are future broodstock and will make their home at Mora for a couple more years.

Video credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Mesmerizing!  Witness chinook salmon hatch, courtesy of Michigan Department of Natural Resources.  Come spring, Gila tro...
11/30/2020
Trout in the Classroom National Network

Mesmerizing! Witness chinook salmon hatch, courtesy of Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Come spring, Gila trout and Rio Grande cutthroat trout will begin their life in a similar fashion.

Grab some 🍿 and watch these little salmon pop right out of their eggs. A hatching time-lapse of 10 hours condensed into

UPDATE: This Gila trout is sporting a PIT tag.  As the trout grows, the tag won't stand out quiet like it does now.#Fish...
11/27/2020

UPDATE: This Gila trout is sporting a PIT tag. As the trout grows, the tag won't stand out quiet like it does now.

#FishFriday Time for a pop quiz! This Gila trout is sporting a tag. This tag will help staff from Mora National Fish Hatchery identify this individual fish. This individual Gila trout, of the Main Diamond lineage, is tagged because it is future broodstock.

What kind of tag is it, PIT or VIE tag? Write your answer in the comments section.

PIT (passive integrated transponder)
VIE (visible implant elastomer)

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Working along side Pueblo of Santa Ana Department of Natural Resources to get the work done.  From fish community monito...
11/24/2020

Working along side Pueblo of Santa Ana Department of Natural Resources to get the work done. From fish community monitoring, delivering endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow, to working with partners, it's just a little of what a FWCO does. We're looking forward to our future endeavors.

The Pueblo had a productive month in November related to the fish community and especially the Rio Grande silvery minnow. During the first week, the Pueblo completed our fall fish survey with help from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs. Special thanks to Angela James with the New Mexico Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office and Chris Kitcheyan with the Bureau of Indian Affairs Southwest Regional Office for their expert ID help.

In the middle of the month, the Pueblo received a shipment of between 50,000 and 70,000 silvery minnows from the Southwestern Native Aquatic Resources Recovery Center. These fish were carefully bucketed down to the river from the delivery truck by U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region staff Thomas Archdeacon and Andy Dean. Special thanks to Ty Terry from the hatchery for making the drive up from Dexter.

Today, we’re following up a little more on last week’s Rio Grande silvery minnow (RGSM) augmentation. The silvery minnow...
11/23/2020

Today, we’re following up a little more on last week’s Rio Grande silvery minnow (RGSM) augmentation. The silvery minnow were hauled, tempered (acclimated to the river’s water temperature), and released into the Rio Grande. The sites stretched across the Rio Grande from Albuquerque to Socorro.

11/21/2020
Rio Grande silvery minnow release

#FishFriday Today, we'll learn about augmentation. Augmentation in the fisheries world means adding to a fish’s wild population, often with hatchery reared fish. The Rio Grande crew have been busy this week with augmentation of the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow. They worked with the Albuquerque BioPark, Southwestern Native Aquatic Resource and Recovery Center, and the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission to get Rio Grande silvery minnow out into the Rio Grande. Check out Albuquerque BioPark crew augmenting the Rio Grande silvery minnow.

Video Credit: Lyle Thomas/USFWS

#WonderWednesday Are you wondering what Lyle is holding in his hand. Lyle has been working on this little contraption, w...
11/18/2020

#WonderWednesday Are you wondering what Lyle is holding in his hand. Lyle has been working on this little contraption, which happens to be the light portion of a light trap. A light trap is just one tool biologists use to collect larval fish during surveys.

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

As field biologists, we love being in the field, no matter what kind of animal we get to work with. Once again, Fish Bio...
11/17/2020

As field biologists, we love being in the field, no matter what kind of animal we get to work with. Once again, Fish Biologists Tanner and Angela found themselves at the pens of the captive facility located in a remote part of Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. Along with staff from Ecological Services Field Office and dedicated volunteers, they provided a helping hand to the Service’s Mexican Wolf Recovery Program. This time around they helped the Wolf Program corral three wolves that had a flight to catch and one wolf that had a blind date waiting for them. It was a great way to spend a Friday night.

As a field office, working in remote terrain can be daunting.  Trust in your own skills and trust in your co-workers is ...
11/16/2020

As a field office, working in remote terrain can be daunting. Trust in your own skills and trust in your co-workers is paramount to getting the job done safely. So when it comes to our First Aid certifications, whether it is socially distancing or via Zoom, we make it a point to keep them current.

Photo image: Fish Biologist, Angela Palacios, practicing CPR before her zoom session to demonstrate skills and knowledge.

Photo credit: Demesia James/USFWS Volunteer

#FishFriday Suckers are all around us.  Every major water way in New Mexico has a species of sucker.  Today, we'll check...
11/13/2020

#FishFriday Suckers are all around us. Every major water way in New Mexico has a species of sucker. Today, we'll check out one of the Gila based suckers, the desert sucker.

Illustration credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Fish of threatened (T) and endangered (E) fish species of New Mexico. Close up views of scales and coloring from left to...
11/09/2020

Fish of threatened (T) and endangered (E) fish species of New Mexico. Close up views of scales and coloring from left to right: razorback sucker, Rio Grande silvery minnow (E), spikedace (E), and Pecos bluntnose shiner (T).

As field biologists in Fisheries we are fortunate to travel throughout in New Mexico.  Not only do we get to see fishes ...
11/09/2020

As field biologists in Fisheries we are fortunate to travel throughout in New Mexico. Not only do we get to see fishes that many may not have the chance to see, but sometimes we cross paths with some pretty impressive wildlife. Such as the case with biologists Steve and Weston, who came across this badger on their way to do fish community monitoring on the Pecos River. This carnivore is a member of the weasel family and is often found in open grasslands and meadows. The badger tolerated their presence just long enough for Steve to get a photo from a safe distance.

Photo credit: Stephen Davenport/USFWS

#ThrowbackThursday A decade ago, our staff was helping our sister office, New Mexico Ecological Services Field Office, c...
11/05/2020

#ThrowbackThursday A decade ago, our staff was helping our sister office, New Mexico Ecological Services Field Office, care for wild adult northern leopard frogs and Chiricahua leopard frog tadpoles. Both frogs and tadpoles were held over the fall 2010 season and returned to the wild once they tested negative for Chytrid fungus.

Both frogs are native to New Mexico and the Chiricahua leopard frog is considered threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Just as our fish species, our native frogs are leaping through the dangers of introduced predators and diseases.

Photo image: Chiricahua leopard frog
Photo credit: Jim Rorabaugh/USFWS

#FishFriday brings us a pair of longnose dace rocking their Halloween costumes. Their cryptic coloration gives them an e...
10/31/2020

#FishFriday brings us a pair of longnose dace rocking their Halloween costumes. Their cryptic coloration gives them an edge in the Rio Grande as they blend with the gravel around them. Aren't they the most adorable "ROCKS" you've ever seen? Happy Halloween!

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

#WonderWednesday  Ever wonder what a yolk sac looks like on a trout?  Well wonder no more.  Here are Gila trout showing ...
10/29/2020

#WonderWednesday Ever wonder what a yolk sac looks like on a trout? Well wonder no more. Here are Gila trout showing off their lovely yolk sacs. They are called alevins at this stage of their life. Alevin simply means the stage of life when a salmon or trout has its yolk sac. Salmon and trout do not feed during this stage since they get all of the nutrients from the yolk sac.

Photo image: Gila trout alevins hatched at Mora National Fish Hatchery in 2016.

Photo credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Fish Biologist, Stephen Davenport, headed south earlier this month to help out the crew from Southwestern Native Aquatic...
10/27/2020

Fish Biologist, Stephen Davenport, headed south earlier this month to help out the crew from Southwestern Native Aquatic Resources & Recovery Center (Center). The crew completed annual stocking of Chihuahua Chub raised at the Center. Crews packed in the threatened Chihuahua chub in buckets to the East Fork of the Mimbres River, otherwise known as McKnight Creek.

"Here’s to the fish! The long haul movers and shakers that live fascinating lives just out of sight."Learn a little more...
10/26/2020
Making Way for Fish Migration

"Here’s to the fish! The long haul movers and shakers that live fascinating lives just out of sight."

Learn a little more about our American eel who once migrated to the Rio Grande, but are now extirpated. Once you get to American eel, click on the secondary link to learn about a cool study happening on the east coast that may help the American eel across the world.

Here’s to the fish! The long haul movers and shakers that live fascinating lives just out of sight.

It's World Fish Migration Day.  Fish migrate to fulfill the same basic needs we all have – for food, to find a mate, see...
10/24/2020
Did you know? Fish Migrate Too!

It's World Fish Migration Day. Fish migrate to fulfill the same basic needs we all have – for food, to find a mate, seeking a safe place to raise their young, and to escape the extremes of changing seasons. Check out this video animating the journey of migrating fish.

Did you know fish migrate just like birds? Migratory fish play an important role in nature. Think about the ways we can work to keep rivers open so fish can ...

Tomorrow is #WorldFishMigrationDay. So for this #FishFriday, we'll introduce you to two fish that once migrated along th...
10/23/2020

Tomorrow is #WorldFishMigrationDay. So for this #FishFriday, we'll introduce you to two fish that once migrated along the Rio Grande. Meet the shovelnose sturgeon and the American eel. Unfortunately, these two species are now extirpated from the Rio Grande.

Help us congratulate Fish Biologists, Angela Palacios (USFWS) and Dustin Myers (U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Fore...
10/20/2020

Help us congratulate Fish Biologists, Angela Palacios (USFWS) and Dustin Myers (U.S. Forest Service - Gila National Forest). Today, the U.S. Forest Service held the 2019 National Rise to the Future Awards for Fisheries, Hydrology, Air, Soil Science, and Wildlife. Angela and Dustin received the 2019 Public Awareness Award for their work with the Gila based Native Fish in the Classroom program.

“Angela Palacios and Dustin Myers of the Gila National Forest are this year's recipients of the Public Awareness Award. The Native Fish in the Classroom Program (NFIC) is an environmental education program in which students learn about natural resource conservation through a hands-on approach of raising fish in the classroom and subsequently releasing the native fish into their native habitat. This amazing program has been very successful in the Albuquerque area for eight years. The program continues to expand and has been going and growing for three years on the Gila National Forest. The NFIC program on the Gila National Forest is especially unique since it focuses on federally listed Gila trout and their habitats in rural schools within the native range of the species. The NFIC Project provides children an opportunity to learn the value of aquatic ecosystems by developing personal connections to native fish. Gila National Forest in cooperation with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service oversee the NFIC program for schools in the local Silver City, Quemado and Cobre School Districts, and Forest staff provide technical assistance through classroom presentations and activities.” U.S. Forest Service – Washington Office

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Southwest Region & USFWS Fisheries

#FishFriday  Can you name a fish (native to New Mexico) that could survive in the salty waters of a sinkhole?  How about...
10/16/2020

#FishFriday Can you name a fish (native to New Mexico) that could survive in the salty waters of a sinkhole? How about a Pecos Pupfish? These little pupfish can handle salty water ranging from 3 to 50 ppt (parts per thousand). Wondering if that is a lot? The Pacific Ocean averages about 35 ppt.

Photo image: Pecos pupfish. A small, thick-bodied fish with large, dark blotches along its head and sides being held in a small viewing tank.

Photo Credit: Angela Palacios/USFWS

Address

3800 Commons Ave NE
Albuquerque, NM
87109

General information

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Opening Hours

Monday 07:00 - 16:30
Tuesday 07:00 - 16:30
Wednesday 07:00 - 16:30
Thursday 07:00 - 16:30
Friday 07:00 - 16:30

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(505) 342-9900

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Comments

Let’s do this!!! Please sign and share!!!
Do you have a picture of the world record Longear Sunfish that was caught on Elephant Butte Lake in 1985 by Patricia Stout? I would like to see it if you do. Thank you.
Who is responsible for making the stupid decision for having a control burn in the Colin Neblett Wildlife area during a COUNTY WIDE BURN BAN and During 30 mph sustained winds!!! ??? Who ever made this ingenious decision should be sent to JAIL!!!