US Forest Service - Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands

US Forest Service - Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands The National Forest Foundation presents the Cibola National Forest and Grasslands
(16)

The National Forest Foundation, chartered by Congress, engages Americans in community-based and national programs that promote the health and public enjoyment of the 193-million-acre National Forest System, administers private gifts of funds and land for the benefit of the National Forests. http://www.nationalforests.org/

The Forest Service manages a system of 155 national forests, 20 national gr

asslands, and 222 research and experimental forests, as well as other special areas, covering more than 192 million acres of public land. The Forest Service has evolved into a 30,000 employee agency that manages the national forests for a number of multiple uses, including recreation, timber, wilderness, minerals, water, grazing, fish, and wildlife.

Sandia Ranger District toImplement Sulphur Canyon RX Pile BurningStarting as early as December 7ALBUQUERQUE, NM – Dec. 4...
12/04/2023

Sandia Ranger District to
Implement Sulphur Canyon RX Pile Burning
Starting as early as December 7

ALBUQUERQUE, NM – Dec. 4, 2023 – Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands fire crews are preparing to implement prescribed fire as early as December 7 on 10 acres of piles within the previously announced Sulphur unit of the Sandia Piles RX Plan. The pile burn area is located in the Sandia east mountains, north of I-40, west of NM-14 and south of NM-536. See map attached. Smoke may be visible from Albuquerque, Tijeras and Edgewood.

Ignition will depend upon agency administrator approval and conditions within the ranges outlined in the prescribed burn plan. Each prescribed fire is designed to accomplish specific objectives and is managed with firefighter and public safety as the highest priority. Fire managers use prescribed fire to improve forest health, remove hazardous fuels, increase firefighter safety, enhance wildlife habitat, and protect communities and watersheds.

Winter is an optimal time to burn piled slash and woody debris from earlier forest restoration work because snow on the ground keeps the fire from spreading to adjacent vegetation. The Cibola NF & NGs manages all prescribed fires in compliance with New Mexico state air quality and smoke management regulations. However, smoke may settle into drainages and lower elevations at night but is expected to dissipate as daytime temperatures increase.

Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the www.airnow.gov/ Smoke-sensitive individuals and people with respiratory problems or heart disease are encouraged to take precautionary measures. Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) website.
https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html

Implementation announcements and updates on prescribed fire projects will be posted on New Mexico Fire Information https://nmfireinfo.com/ and on the Cibola NF & NGs website, Cibola Facebook and Twitter sites.

For more information on the Sulphur Canyon prescribed fire pile burn, contact the Sandia Ranger District Office: 505-281-3304 or Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office: 505-346-3900
# # #

The Capulin Snow Play Area located on Forest Road 438B, off NM 536 Crest Highway is Open.Before you head out to play, ch...
12/01/2023

The Capulin Snow Play Area located on Forest Road 438B, off NM 536 Crest Highway is Open.

Before you head out to play, check road conditions at nmroads.com/map
and weather forecasts at www.weather.gov

Please help preserve resources by staying off areas that have minimal snow coverage while in the snow play area.

The public is encouraged to purchase their day use passes online at www.recreation.gov/ These digital passes can be used for all developed recreation sites that charge a standard day use fee on the Sandia and Black Kettle Ranger Districts.

The cost at the Capulin Snow Play Area is $3.00 per vehicle for 1 day unless you purchase the Sandia Ranger District Amenity Pass. The fee for 15+ passenger vans and buses is $10 per vehicle. The Sandia Ranger District Annual Amenity Pass is $30.00. It is valid for a full year until the end of the month in which you purchase it. If you have a current America the Beautiful Interagency Annual, Access, Senior, Military or Every Kid Outdoors pass, please display it on your dashboard or hang it on your rearview mirror as directed at purchase.

Slide on approved devices only: Inner Tubes, Plastic Discs & Sleds. No metal or wood allowed.

Sledding is at your own Risk. Pursuant to: 36 CFR 261.54(a), 56, 58, 58(cc)

Additional Rules and Safety are posted on www Cibola National Forest Capulin Snow Play Site. www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/cibola/recreation/wintersports/recarea/?recid=64198&actid=88

If you plan to visit the National Forests and National Grasslands, be prepared for winter weather and know before you go Know Before You Go at: www.fs.usda.gov/visit/know-you-go

Visit the official Cibola NF & NGs www site fs.usda.gov/recmain/cibola/recreation to check the open and closed status of all recreation sites on the Cibola National Forest and Grasslands.

Due to winter storm conditions and forecasted weather advisory thru today and tomorrow in central New Mexico, the Cibola...
11/30/2023

Due to winter storm conditions and forecasted weather advisory thru today and tomorrow in central New Mexico, the Cibola National Forest & National Grassland district offices may have delayed opening or closures.

The public is encouraged to call ahead to the appropriate office to ensure locations are open for visitor information services.

Check forecasts before you head out at www.weather.gov

Check NM Road conditions at www.nmroads.com

Mt. Taylor Ranger District:
1800 Lobo Canyon Rd., Grants, NM 87020
505-287-8833

Magdalena Ranger District:
203 First St., Magdalena, NM 87825
575-854-2281

Mountainair Ranger District:
40 Ranger Station Rd., Mountainair, NM 87036
505-847-2990

Sandia Ranger District:
11776 Hwy. 337, Tijeras, NM 87059
505-281-3304

Black Kettle/McClellan Creek National Grasslands:
18555 Hwy. 47A Suite B, Cheyenne, OK 73628
580-497-2143

Kiowa/Rita Blanca National Grasslands:
714 Main St., Clayton, NM 88415
575-374-9652

Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office:
2113 Osuna Rd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113
505-346-3900

www.fs.usda.gov/cibola

Crews Complete Ignitions on Capilla Prescribed Fire Pile BurningMountainair Ranger DistrictToday, per prescribed burn pl...
11/29/2023

Crews Complete Ignitions on Capilla Prescribed Fire Pile Burning
Mountainair Ranger District

Today, per prescribed burn plan objectives, Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands fire crews completed ignition of 13 acres of pile burning within the Capilla Fuels Reduction and Restoration Project in the Manzano Mountains. Piles were located between Upper and Lower Red Canyon Campgrounds, just west of FSR 253/422. Map attached.

With ignitions complete, onsite resources will continue securing and mopping up all hotspots within the burn perimeter until it is completely out. Residual smoke may be visible in the surrounding areas of Mountainair, Punta de Agua, Manzano, Torreon and the Estancia Valley.

Ignitions are dependent upon agency administrator approval and conditions within the ranges outlined in the prescribed burn plan. Each prescribed fire is designed to accomplish specific objectives and is managed with firefighter and public safety as the highest priority. Fire managers use prescribed fire to improve forest health, remove hazardous fuels, increase firefighter safety, enhance wildlife habitat, and protect communities and watersheds.

Winter is an optimal time to burn piled slash and woody debris from earlier forest restoration work because snow on the ground keeps the fire from spreading to adjacent vegetation.

The Cibola NF & NGs manages all prescribed fires in compliance with New Mexico state air quality and smoke management regulations. However, smoke may settle into drainages and lower elevations at night but is expected to dissipate as daytime temperatures increase. Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the www.airnow.gov/ Smoke-sensitive individuals and people with respiratory problems or heart disease are encouraged to take precautionary measures.

Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) website. https://nmtracking.org/environment/air/FireAndSmoke.html

Cibola National Forest & Grasslands Updates District Fire Danger RatingsThe fire danger rating for the Magdalena, Mount ...
11/28/2023

Cibola National Forest & Grasslands Updates District Fire Danger Ratings

The fire danger rating for the Magdalena, Mount Taylor and Mountainair Ranger Districts on the Cibola National Forest & Grasslands have been lowered following recent rain and snow fall.

Black Kettle Ranger District: HIGH
Kiowa and Rita Blanca Ranger District: HIGH
Magdalena Ranger District: Low (Rating lowered)
Mount Taylor Ranger District: Low (Rating lowered)
Sandia Ranger District: Low
Mountainair Ranger District: Low (Rating lowered)

The Fire Danger Rating is calculated by measuring the dryness of wood, grass and other combustible material, weather conditions and the terrain. The combination of these factors results in one of five fire danger levels: low, moderate, high, very high and extreme.

Fire managers consider several factors when evaluating for fire danger level. Data from Remote Weather Stations (RAWS) located across the forest and grasslands are aggregated together, producing the Energy Release Component (ERC). As live fuels cure and dead fuels dry, the ERC will increase and can be described as a build-up index. Each daily calculation considers the past 7 days in calculating the new number. Fire managers and planners have found that the ERC can be used as a decision tool to prepare for an approaching fire season. This data is evaluated in addition to the number of human-caused fires, red flag and critical fire days.

What are the different levels and what do they mean?

There are 5 different color-coded levels to help the public understand fire potential. The purpose of this is for visitors to understand the current conditions and help mitigate their actions to prevent human-caused wildfires.

Fire Danger Level: LOW - Green
Means that fuels do not ignite easily from small embers, but a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or dry rotten wood. Fires in open, dry grasslands may easily burn a few hours after a rain, but most wood fires will spread slowly, creeping or smoldering. Control of fires is generally easy.

Fire Danger Level: MODERATE - Blue
Means that fires can start from most accidental causes, but the number of fire starts is usually low. If a fire does start in an open, dry grassland, it will burn and spread quickly on windy days. Most wood fires will spread slowly to moderately. Average fire intensity will be moderate except in heavy concentrations of fuel, which may burn hot. Fires are still not likely to become serious and are often easy to control.

Fire Danger Level: HIGH - Yellow
Fires can start easily from most causes, and small fuels (such as grasses and needles) will ignite readily. Unattended campfires and brush fires are likely to escape. Fires will spread easily, with some areas of high-intensity burning on slopes or concentrated fuels. Fires can become serious and difficult to control unless they are put out while they are still small.

Fire Danger Level: VERY HIGH - Orange
Fires will start easily from most causes. The fires will spread rapidly and have a quick increase in intensity, right after ignition. Small fires can quickly become large fires and exhibit extreme fire intensity, such as long-distance spotting and fire whirls. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

Fire Danger Level: EXTREME - Red
Fires of all types start quickly and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious and can spread very quickly with intense burning. Small fires become big fires much faster than at the "Very High" level. Spot fires are probable, with long-distance spotting likely. These fires are very difficult to fight and may become very dangerous and often last for several days or weeks.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola
https://nmfireinfo.com/

Mountainair Ranger District to Implement Capilla Pile BurningStarting as early as November 29Cibola National Forest and ...
11/27/2023

Mountainair Ranger District to Implement Capilla Pile Burning
Starting as early as November 29

Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands fire crews are preparing to proceed with prescribed fire on the previously announced Capilla pile burn on the Mountainair Ranger District as early as Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2023. Fire crews plan to burn approximately 13 acres of piles located between Upper and Lower Red Canyon Campgrounds, just west of FSR 253. Map attached. Smoke may be visible in the surrounding areas of Mountainair, Punta de Agua, Manzano, Torreon and the Estancia Valley.

Ignition will depend upon agency administrator approval and conditions within the ranges outlined in the prescribed burn plan. Each prescribed fire is designed to accomplish specific objectives and is managed with firefighter and public safety as the highest priority. Fire managers use prescribed fire to improve forest health, remove hazardous fuels, increase firefighter safety, enhance wildlife habitat, and protect communities and watersheds.

Winter is an optimal time to burn piled slash and woody debris from earlier forest restoration work because snow on the ground keeps the fire from spreading to adjacent vegetation. The Cibola NF & NGs manages all prescribed fires in compliance with New Mexico state air quality and smoke management regulations. However, smoke may settle into drainages and lower elevations at night but is expected to dissipate as daytime temperatures increase. Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the www.airnow.gov/. Smoke-sensitive individuals and people with respiratory problems or heart disease are encouraged to take precautionary measures. Information on air quality and protecting your health can be found online at the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) website.

Implementation announcements and updates on prescribed fire projects will be posted on New Mexico Fire Information and on the Cibola NF & NGs website, Cibola Facebook and Cibola Twitter sites.

For more information on the Capilla prescribed fire, contact the Mountainair Ranger District Office at 505-847-2990 or Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office: 505-346-3900

Offices Closed to Visitor Services on November 29Visitor services at the Supervisor’s Office and district offices of the...
11/27/2023

Offices Closed to Visitor Services on November 29

Visitor services at the Supervisor’s Office and district offices of the Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands will be closed on Wednesday, November 29, 2023, during an employee training event. In-person and telephone services will be unavailable.

Regular business hours will resume on Thursday, November 30.

The Forest apologizes for any inconvenience.

For more information go to the Cibola NF & NGs website https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola
Or
contact the appropriate office prior to the Nov. 29th closure.

Mt. Taylor Ranger District: 1800 Lobo Canyon Rd., Grants, NM 87020 (505-287-8833)

Magdalena Ranger District: 203 First St., Magdalena, NM 87825 (575-854-2281)

Mountainair Ranger District: 40 Ranger Station Rd., Mountainair, NM 87036 (505-847-2990)

Sandia Ranger District: 11776 Hwy. 337, Tijeras, NM 87059 (505-281-3304)

Black Kettle/McClellan Creek National Grasslands: 18555 Hwy. 47A Suite B, Cheyenne, OK 73628
(580-497-2143)

Kiowa/Rita Blanca National Grasslands: 714 Main St., Clayton, NM 88415 (575-374-9652)

Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office:2113 Osuna Rd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87113 (505-346-3900)

Cibola National Forest & Grasslands Updates District Fire Danger RatingsThe fire danger rating for the Mount Taylor & Sa...
11/21/2023

Cibola National Forest & Grasslands Updates District Fire Danger Ratings

The fire danger rating for the Mount Taylor & Sandia Ranger Districts on the Cibola National Forest & Grasslands have been lowered following recent rain activity.

Black Kettle Ranger District: HIGH
Kiowa and Rita Blanca Ranger District: HIGH
Magdalena Ranger District: Moderate
Mount Taylor Ranger District: Moderate (Rating lowered)
Sandia Ranger District: Low (Rating lowered)
Mountainair Ranger District: Moderate

The Fire Danger Rating is calculated by measuring the dryness of wood, grass and other combustible material, weather conditions and the terrain. The combination of these factors results in one of five fire danger levels: low, moderate, high, very high and extreme.

Fire managers consider several factors when evaluating for fire danger level. Data from Remote Weather Stations (RAWS) located across the forest and grasslands are aggregated together, producing the Energy Release Component (ERC). As live fuels cure and dead fuels dry, the ERC will increase and can be described as a build-up index. Each daily calculation considers the past 7 days in calculating the new number. Fire managers and planners have found that the ERC can be used as a decision tool to prepare for an approaching fire season. This data is evaluated in addition to the number of human-caused fires, red flag and critical fire days.

What are the different levels and what do they mean?

There are 5 different color-coded levels to help the public understand fire potential. The purpose of this is for visitors to understand the current conditions and help mitigate their actions to prevent human-caused wildfires.

Fire Danger Level: LOW - Green
Means that fuels do not ignite easily from small embers, but a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or dry rotten wood. Fires in open, dry grasslands may easily burn a few hours after a rain, but most wood fires will spread slowly, creeping or smoldering. Control of fires is generally easy.

Fire Danger Level: MODERATE - Blue
Means that fires can start from most accidental causes, but the number of fire starts is usually low. If a fire does start in an open, dry grassland, it will burn and spread quickly on windy days. Most wood fires will spread slowly to moderately. Average fire intensity will be moderate except in heavy concentrations of fuel, which may burn hot. Fires are still not likely to become serious and are often easy to control.

Fire Danger Level: HIGH - Yellow
Fires can start easily from most causes, and small fuels (such as grasses and needles) will ignite readily. Unattended campfires and brush fires are likely to escape. Fires will spread easily, with some areas of high-intensity burning on slopes or concentrated fuels. Fires can become serious and difficult to control unless they are put out while they are still small.

Fire Danger Level: VERY HIGH - Orange
Fires will start easily from most causes. The fires will spread rapidly and have a quick increase in intensity, right after ignition. Small fires can quickly become large fires and exhibit extreme fire intensity, such as long-distance spotting and fire whirls. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

Fire Danger Level: EXTREME - Red
Fires of all types start quickly and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious and can spread very quickly with intense burning. Small fires become big fires much faster than at the "Very High" level. Spot fires are probable, with long-distance spotting likely. These fires are very difficult to fight and may become very dangerous and often last for several days or weeks.

https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola
https://nmfireinfo.com/

All Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands (NF & NGs) Supervisor and District Offices will be closed on Thurs., ...
11/20/2023

All Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands (NF & NGs) Supervisor and District Offices will be closed on Thurs., Nov. 23rd for the Thanksgiving Day Federal Holiday. Essential services not included.

Visitor information services may be limited on Fri. Nov. 24th. We encourage visitors to call ahead at the appropriate ranger district for information on services.

Cibola NF & NGs anticipate a large number of visitors over the holiday weekend. Visitors are encouraged to prepare for your visit this holiday weekend by exploring the many recreation sites and trails on the Cibola National Forest at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/cibola/recreation

We all want to have a great time when visiting National Forests and Grasslands, but do you know how to best prepare for an outdoor adventure? If you plan to visit, check the weather forecast, know before you go https://www.fs.usda.gov/visit/know-before-you-go and Leave No Trace https://lnt.org/

For more information go to the Cibola NF & NGs website
https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola
Or
contact the appropriate ranger district ahead of time.
Magdalena Ranger District Office: 575-854-2281.
Mountainair Ranger District Office: 505-847-2990
Mt. Taylor Ranger District Office: 505-287-8833
Sandia Ranger District Office: 505-281-3304
Black Kettle NGs Ranger District Office: 580-497-2143
Kiowa and Rita Blanca Ranger District Office: 575-374-9652
Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office: 505-346-3900

SPECIAL EVENT NOTICECity of Albuquerque Open Space and Parks and Recreation:2023 Foothills 10 Mile Run - 11.12.23. On Su...
11/08/2023

SPECIAL EVENT NOTICE

City of Albuquerque Open Space and Parks and Recreation:
2023 Foothills 10 Mile Run - 11.12.23.

On Sunday, November 12, 2023 from 7 am to 12 pm, the foot race will be on established trails surrounding the Elena Gallegos Open Space. The race is organized by the City of Albuquerque Parks & Recreation Department. The run will start and finish at Elena Gallegos Open Space. There will be no access to Elena Gallegos Open Space during the race. All participants and spectators are encouraged to park at Albertsons Market located at 12201 Academy Rd NE or County Line & Outpost Ice Arena 9600 Tramway Blvd NE. There will be buses to transport runners and spectators to the race site.

The loop course involves trails maintained by the Open Space Division as well as Forest Service system trails.

For more information: https://www.foothills10milerun.com/

Visitors to the Sandia Ranger District westside foothills may be impacted on Sunday November 12th and are encouraged to explore other recreation sites and trails on the Cibola National Forest at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/cibola/recreation

Offices Close on Friday November 10in Observance of Veterans Day Federal HolidayAll Cibola National Forest and National ...
11/03/2023

Offices Close on Friday November 10
in Observance of Veterans Day Federal Holiday

All Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands (NF & NGs) Supervisor and District Offices will be closed on Friday, November 10, 2023 in observance of Veterans Day Federal Holiday. Essential services not included.

The offices will resume regular business hours on Monday, November 13.

In honor of the men and women who have served in the armed forces, the Forest Service will waive recreation fees at most day-use sites on lands managed by the agency on Veterans Day Saturday, November 11, 2023. The Forest Service participates in fee-free days with other federal agencies to encourage Americans to visit their public lands. Veterans Day is the final fee-free day for 2023. The next fee-free day will be Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 15, 2024.

Cibola NF & NGs anticipate a large number of visitors over the holiday weekend. Visitors are encouraged to prepare for your visit this holiday weekend by exploring the many recreation sites and trails on the Cibola National Forest at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/cibola/recreation

We all want to have a great time when visiting National Forests and Grasslands, but do you know how to best prepare for an outdoor adventure? If you plan to visit, check the weather forecast, know before you go and Leave No Trace.
https://www.weather.gov/
https://www.fs.usda.gov/visit/know-before-you-go
https://lnt.org/

For more information go to the Cibola NF & NGs website https://www.fs.usda.gov/US Forest Service - Cibola National Forest & National Grasslands.
Or contact the appropriate ranger district ahead of time.
Magdalena Ranger District Office: 575-854-2281.
Mountainair Ranger District Office: 505-847-2990
Mt. Taylor Ranger District Office: 505-287-8833
Sandia Ranger District Office: 505-281-3304
Black Kettle NGs Ranger District Office: 580-497-2143
Kiowa and Rita Blanca Ranger District Office: 575-374-9652
Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office: 505-346-3900

# # #
USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

Wildfire Preparedness is Year-Round:  Don’t Fall BehindWith fall weather in the air, temperatures are getting colder, an...
11/03/2023

Wildfire Preparedness is Year-Round:
Don’t Fall Behind

With fall weather in the air, temperatures are getting colder, and nights are getting longer. This also means that trees are shedding their leaves and dropping their needles. As these burnable materials pile up, they become a fuel bed and can become a fire hazard under dry conditions. In the event of a wildfire, leaves and needles are a fuel source for embers and can ignite easily allowing fires to spread to your home.

This month’s Wildfire Preparedness Is Year-Round Message: Don’t Fall Behind. Maintain preparedness by clearing leaves and debris around your home. Areas to focus on should be:

Rooftops/Gutters
• Typically, the most vulnerable area of a home is the rooftop. Clean around your rooftop and gutters ensuring they are free of leaves, needles, and vegetation.

Deck/Balconies
• Decks and balconies should be cleaned and free of leaves and pine needles.

Landscape/Outlying Structures
• Rake and clear areas surrounding your home and any outlying structures ensuring they are clean and free of debris and leaf litter.

Preparedness year-round helps to keep your home and property safe from wildfire.

For additional preparedness tip visit NFPA - Preparing Homes for Wildfires. https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Fire-causes-and-risks/Wildfire/Preparing-homes-for-wildfire

Partners in the 2023 Wildfire Preparedness Campaign are the Forest Stewards Guild, Fire Adapted NM learning network, New Mexico Forestry Division, New Mexico Coalition of Conservation Districts, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Land Management New Mexico, the Santa Fe National Forest and the Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands.

Bookmark the wildfire preparedness webpage to follow the campaign throughout the year. https://facnm.org/wildfire-preparedness

The Friends of Tijeras Pueblo Monthly Lecture SeriesTwo Related Bridges:On the Pecos River in New Mexico and in Sevilla,...
11/02/2023

The Friends of Tijeras Pueblo Monthly Lecture Series

Two Related Bridges:
On the Pecos River in New Mexico and in Sevilla, Spain
by Richard Flint and Shirley Cushing Flint

Tuesday, November 14, 2023 at 6:30 pm, Sandia Ranger Station, Tijeras

In the summer of 1980, historians and paleographers Richard and Shirley Flint, first became interested in the sixteenth-century Coronado expedition. What triggered that interest was a footnote published by George Parker Winship in 1896. That footnote dealt with the location of a bridge supposedly built by the expedition in 1541 across an unknown river in what is now New Mexico.

The footnote raised many questions in addition to exactly where a bridge might have been built. Was it a genuine bridge? Some scholars suggested that the manuscript documents were actually referring to the fording of a river. If it was a genuine bridge, why was such a structure necessary? It would have been the only bridge built by the expedition over its 4,000-mile roundtrip, which included crossing many rivers. If a bridge was built, what sort of a structure was it? Who designed it? Who built it? Are there surviving remnants of the bridge?

The Flints published provisional answers to some of those questions in a series of articles in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Since then, they have published nine books and scores of journal articles about many aspects of the Coronado expedition and related topics. Now, roughly 40 years later, they update and expand the results of their research about the Coronado expedition’s one-and-only bridge. That information includes the revelation that the expedition included an expert in bridge construction and repair.

The Flints are a collaborative team of independent scholars with major focus on archival research and publication on the early to middle sixteenth century in the U.S. Southwest and Northwest Mexico. Their special interest for 40+ years has been the Coronado entrada of 1539-1542 and related activities. They are widely considered to be the foremost authorities on that subject. They have published nine books and dozens of journal article dealing with the sixteenth-century collision between Indigenous Americans and Europeans. In collaboration with the UNM Libraries, the Flints have produced an extensive online data base of information about participants, organizers, and supporters of that entrada:www.coronado.unm.edu. It is freely available to all for use in research and non-commercial publication.

For more information contact the Sandia Ranger District at 505-281-3304 and visit us online at www.friendsoftijeraspueblo.org

NEW MEXICO & TEXAS BHA RECEIVE USFS PRAIRIE PARTNER AWARDThe New Mexico & Texas Chapters of Backcountry Hunter & Anglers...
11/02/2023

NEW MEXICO & TEXAS BHA RECEIVE USFS PRAIRIE PARTNER AWARD

The New Mexico & Texas Chapters of Backcountry Hunter & Anglers has received the Forest Service’s 2023 Prairie Partner Award!

This award is for external partners that have demonstrated resource stewardship, a willingness to provide funding and other resources to Grassland projects and have produced innovative practices and results.

Hunters and non-hunters have worked alongside USFS Biologist Kristen Warren and her staff to modify/verify 88.4 miles of fenceline, replace barbed wire with smooth wire on 2.2 miles of water exclosure fence, and improve habitat permeability for 29,376 ac or 45.91 sq. mi of this highly valuable shortgrass prairie ecosystem.

Congratulations BHA!

To read more on this partnership and award go to: https://www.backcountryhunters.org/new_mexico_texas_bha_receive_usfs_prairie_partner_award

The fire danger rating for the Mt Taylor Ranger District on the Cibola National Forest & Grasslands has been updated to ...
11/02/2023

The fire danger rating for the Mt Taylor Ranger District on the Cibola National Forest & Grasslands has been updated to HIGH.

This increase only applies to the Mt Taylor Ranger District. All other districts on the Cibola NF & NGs remain at moderate at this time.

The Fire Danger Rating is calculated by measuring the dryness of wood, grass and other combustible material, weather conditions and the terrain. The combination of these factors results in one of five fire danger levels: low, moderate, high, very high and extreme.

Fire managers consider several factors when elevating the fire danger level. Data from Remote Weather Stations (RAWS) located across the forest and grasslands are aggregated together, producing the Energy Release Component (ERC). As live fuels cure and dead fuels dry, the ERC will increase and can be described as a build-up index. Each daily calculation considers the past 7 days in calculating the new number. Fire managers and planners have found that the ERC can be used as a decision tool to prepare for an approaching fire season. This data is evaluated in addition to the number of human-caused fires, red flag and critical fire days.

Current district fire danger rating:
Black Kettle Ranger District: Moderate
Kiowa and Rita Blanca Ranger District: Moderate
Magdalena Ranger District: Moderate
Mount Taylor Ranger District: HIGH (Rating Update)
Sandia Ranger District: Moderate
Mountainair Ranger District: Moderate

What are the different levels and what do they mean?
There are 5 different color-coded levels to help the public understand fire potential. The purpose of this is for visitors to understand the current conditions and help mitigate their actions to prevent human-caused wildfires.

Fire Danger Level: LOW - Green
Means that fuels do not ignite easily from small embers, but a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or dry rotten wood. Fires in open, dry grasslands may easily burn a few hours after a rain, but most wood fires will spread slowly, creeping or smoldering. Control of fires is generally easy.

Fire Danger Level: MODERATE - Blue
Means that fires can start from most accidental causes, but the number of fire starts is usually low. If a fire does start in an open, dry grassland, it will burn and spread quickly on windy days. Most wood fires will spread slowly to moderately. Average fire intensity will be moderate except in heavy concentrations of fuel, which may burn hot. Fires are still not likely to become serious and are often easy to control.

Fire Danger Level: HIGH - Yellow
Fires can start easily from most causes, and small fuels (such as grasses and needles) will ignite readily. Unattended campfires and brush fires are likely to escape. Fires will spread easily, with some areas of high-intensity burning on slopes or concentrated fuels. Fires can become serious and difficult to control unless they are put out while they are still small.

Fire Danger Level: VERY HIGH - Orange
Fires will start easily from most causes. The fires will spread rapidly and have a quick increase in intensity, right after ignition. Small fires can quickly become large fires and exhibit extreme fire intensity, such as long-distance spotting and fire whirls. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

Fire Danger Level: EXTREME - Red
Fires of all types start quickly and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious and can spread very quickly with intense burning. Small fires become big fires much faster than at the "Very High" level. Spot fires are probable, with long-distance spotting likely. These fires are very difficult to fight and may become very dangerous and often last for several days or weeks.

All Cibola NF & NGs fire information will be posted on the Cibola NF & NGs website, New Mexico Fire Information website, and the Cibola NF & NGs Facebook & Twitter pages.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/cibola
https://nmfireinfo.com/

Address

2113 Osuna Road NE
Albuquerque, NM
87113

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 4:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 4:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 4:30pm
Thursday 8am - 4:30pm
Friday 8am - 4:30pm

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(505) 346-3900

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